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Newbie NEEDS a Plane

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Forum topic by tubaforewilly posted 07-14-2016 03:56 PM 669 views 1 time favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tubaforewilly

11 posts in 150 days


07-14-2016 03:56 PM

Hey folks,

I need a plane. I want to start working with handtools more primarily due to sound. I live in a tight neighborhood and my shop is directly below my 3 year old daughters bed room. I enjoy watching “The English Woodworker” channel on youtube and he suggests that a “first plane” should be a jack plane. I’d like to get one as my birthday is next month. Can any of you glorious lumber jocks sell me one? I can’t afford an LN or Veritas so I’m beating the bushes for a ready to work Stanley #5 ish.

-- I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. No man comes to the Father except through Me. John 14:6


33 replies so far

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2326 days


#1 posted 07-14-2016 04:11 PM

I’d suggest contacting LumberJock Don W who rehabs and sells old tools, especially hand planes. He has a web site Time Tested Tools and everything I’ve seen leads me to believe he will be able to give you a good deal on a good tool.

Good Luck!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1471 posts in 2105 days


#2 posted 07-14-2016 04:17 PM

I keep telling myself I need to sell some of the too many that I’ve bought, but it’s hard to part with any of them, and they won’t bring much money. I’m sure I have 5 number 5’s, not counting the ones I don’t count.

-Paul

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#3 posted 07-14-2016 04:35 PM

I have a #5 for sale. The one at the bottom. Type 11 I believe. 65$ plus shipping. PM if interested.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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tubaforewilly

11 posts in 150 days


#4 posted 07-14-2016 05:23 PM

It would appear that I cannot send a PM just yet. TheFrige: Does that #5 cut well? It looks nice!

-- I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. No man comes to the Father except through Me. John 14:6

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#5 posted 07-14-2016 06:43 PM

Just as good as any other. Til it needs sharpening. Which is something else you might want to look into.

Edit: I can get some better pics when I get home.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Ocelot

1471 posts in 2105 days


#6 posted 07-14-2016 09:12 PM

Mine’s not as nice looking as TheFridge’s plane, but I might be willing to part with the one in the center below.

It’s a type 12. The horn (tip) of the tote (rear handle) is broken, which has no effect on usage. I’d let it go for $50 plus shipping.

Here’s the back end of it as received before light “restoration”. I don’t think I have a photo from that angle after I cleaned it up.

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Ocelot

1471 posts in 2105 days


#7 posted 07-14-2016 09:14 PM

I warn you no matter which plane you buy, it won’t be the last! The addiction will grip you. ;-)

Since I don’t really want to sell it, I recommend you buy TheFridge’s plane instead. I forgot to note that this one also had a broken adjusting yoke when I received it, which I replaced with one from a Fulton plane which seems to fit perfectly and work fine (as a lot a planes were copies of Stanley).

View RD87's profile

RD87

16 posts in 269 days


#8 posted 07-18-2016 01:38 AM

I was in your shoes not too long ago, and I can very confidently suggest that you contact Aidan1211 on this site. I have bought a few user condition tools from him and they are well priced and have always worked well. He also doesn’t mind spending some time explaining how to use them and helping you decide which ones would best suit what you want to do.

On another note, if you are looking for a good resource on all things hand tools, look up Paul Sellers. He has a bunch of YouTube videos and a solid blog that shows you how to use hand tools and how to restore them. He also has a great system for hand sharpening pretty much any tool (i.e. No jigs). I never thought I would be able to sharpen plane irons by hand, but if you put in just a little practice time using his method, you can get great results.

Good luck.

Rob

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#9 posted 07-18-2016 12:03 PM

Two pieces of advice:

1. Stay away from Ebay.

2. Start looking into what sharpening system you will go with – before you even get the plane.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2244 days


#10 posted 07-18-2016 12:18 PM

To be honest, go to HD or any other box store and get a $5 – $10.00 block plane. Learn to sharpen it.

Why?

Teaches you what you need to know, especially when you drop it and it breaks. These tools are heavy, and require care. Once you think it is sharp, that is a good start. After you push it across a piece of oak and it either tears it up and gouges the crap out of it or you are working up a sweat after two times, then you either put it on the shelf and buy a power plane or you actually learn how to sharpen the fool thing (best option) to the point where it glides through the wood. This is when your love for these tools takes hold.

This is when you take your new skill set and sharpen all of your toys (oops) tools.

My 2 cents.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Bill White's profile (online now)

Bill White

4457 posts in 3427 days


#11 posted 07-18-2016 02:03 PM

+1 on Aidan 1211. Great guy, and he’ll treat ya well.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#12 posted 07-18-2016 02:56 PM


To be honest, go to HD or any other box store and get a $5 – $10.00 block plane. Learn to sharpen it.

Why?

Teaches you what you need to know, especially when you drop it and it breaks. These tools are heavy, and require care. Once you think it is sharp, that is a good start. After you push it across a piece of oak and it either tears it up and gouges the crap out of it or you are working up a sweat after two times, then you either put it on the shelf and buy a power plane or you actually learn how to sharpen the fool thing (best option) to the point where it glides through the wood. This is when your love for these tools takes hold.

This is when you take your new skill set and sharpen all of your toys (oops) tools.

My 2 cents.

- dbray45

Have to totally disagree with this^^. First, the poster doesn’t seem to have a basic understanding of tuning or using a plane. Second, a power plane will never take the place of a hand plane.

Third, IMO you need to start out with a quality tool, not a box store POJ.
Poor quality tools only frustrate the newbie because you don’t know if its the tool or you. I struggled with cheap hand tools and thought I was a low skill person until I finally obtained a decent plane and learned to tune and sharpen it. My ww’ing immediately rose to a new level.

I think a #4 is the best plane to start out with. Check this out I think it is a good option for.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2244 days


#13 posted 07-18-2016 07:21 PM

Please disagree, I’m good with it but why?

I have a few box store planes and the only thing thing about them that was not great (after tuning) are the quality of the blades – they do not stay sharp. You can tune any plane and have it work very well for you. If the blade is crap, get a couple of spares. Then – get a good plane.

That being said, even LN and LV planes out of the box need touching up when you get them.

When you are just learning how to use and care for these and you run a good plane across a nail or drop it on the floor, only to have it shatter, spending $10 – $15 gets a whole lot more cost effective. It also gives you a tool that you can use at a neighbor’s house, the kid’s house, and anywhere a piece of wood that you are unsure of.

And yes, I know some folks that went out and bought a power plane and were even more frustrated – until I taught them how to sharpen their hand planes.

If you want a really nice plane – flea markets are great – get a couple of rusty ones and clean them up. Once you do this, they will be your “go to” planes.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2244 days


#14 posted 07-18-2016 07:28 PM

Wood working is not an instant gratification thing – at least to me. It is all about what I make – and sometimes the expensive tools are a distraction more than the cure.

On another note –
1.) Working fast while using really sharp tools gets dangerous.
2.) Working with dull tools is far more dangerous than #1.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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Ocelot

1471 posts in 2105 days


#15 posted 07-18-2016 07:38 PM

Sharpness is the most important attribute of a plane.

I have a blue English Stanley no 4 that I bought at Walmart in the 80’s that planes very nicely. Nobody on eBay would even bid on a thing like that.

I’ve bought many (more than 20) planes on ebay and have received only one dud. A person with a little understanding and patience can make most old Stanley planes work very nicely.

A plane is just a blade and some parts to help move it over the wood in a controlled manner.

-Paul

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