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Lubing Plastic Gears In The Tablesaw.

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Forum topic by Blackie_ posted 07-14-2016 10:40 AM 847 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1973 days


07-14-2016 10:40 AM

I’d like others help on what I should use for lubing the plastic gears in my tablesaw for miter cut arbor tilt. I’ve had my hitachi c10fl table saw for several years now and the plastic gears for rotating the blade have never been lubed since I’ve had brand new from Lowes thus it’s now a struggle to tilt the blade.

Thanks

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs


34 replies so far

View CharleyL's profile

CharleyL

196 posts in 2825 days


#1 posted 07-14-2016 10:56 AM

Well, I’ve not used it on plastic gears, but Johnson’s Paste Wax has always been my choice for lubricating my table saws. I apply it with an old tooth brush. The surface of it dries so sawdust doesn’t stick to it, but it stays in place
and lubricates like heavy petroleum grease. It’s also the only thing that I use on my tape tops to reduce friction and also prevent rust. It would seem that it should work on your plastic gears too. I only use a Teflon base dry lubricant on bearing points of the shafts, etc. where the paste wax doesn’t flow into. Gears and ways always get the paste wax.

Charley

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1450 days


#2 posted 07-14-2016 11:35 AM

I use paste wax as well on just about all surfaces for friction reduction. Same as above for the table saw. I disassembled my lathe, degreased it, and slathered it in paste wax.

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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1973 days


#3 posted 07-14-2016 11:39 AM

I’ve heard white lithium grease, but I have concerns of it attracting clogging with sawdust. Paste wax I use on table top as well, I never thought about using it on the gears.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Mrkixx's profile

Mrkixx

62 posts in 1440 days


#4 posted 07-14-2016 11:58 AM

I would like to say to use some sort of silicone spray, but with my experience silicone spray doesn’t seam to last that long under high friction, one thing too, is no matter what lube you use in will still hold onto the saw dust. silicone spray not so much though. ( plastic gears) why ? On earth would and do they put them in power tools is beyond me. But the other thing I think you should do is maybe call a power tool service center and maybe ask them what they would do or not do in dealing with plastic gears in such a tool. Try calling Hitachi, it might be a common situation.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17125 posts in 2566 days


#5 posted 07-14-2016 12:00 PM

Hi Randy. I use silicon spray on the slides and the gears.

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4531 posts in 1973 days


#6 posted 07-14-2016 12:30 PM

It’s a learning process Mrkixx, now if and when the time comes that I swap the saw out for a new saw, I’ll be sure to take a look inside to see how it ticks.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View bosum3919's profile

bosum3919

338 posts in 1080 days


#7 posted 07-14-2016 12:57 PM

Randy, while I don’t have plastic gears, I do use white lithium grease and I don’t have a lot of problems with it attracting sawdust I just hit it with the air hose ever so often and it cleans right up.

-- Bob

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Plain

157 posts in 159 days


#8 posted 07-14-2016 01:31 PM

If they are made from teflon (most probably) dont worry. It is selflubricating material and in low frequency scenarios like this do not require extra lubrication.

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

2169 posts in 1728 days


#9 posted 07-14-2016 01:41 PM

Blackie, plastic gears are often self-lubricating if kept clean. Your problem might not be the gears themselves, but the other points in the crank chain. You probably have bearings and guides that could use oiling and perhaps trunnions that could use cleaning and lubing. Any parts that move during the process of adjusting the angle may be the source or sources of the added friction.

I built this jig and have seldom angled my blade recently.

-- Big Al in IN

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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1973 days


#10 posted 07-14-2016 02:02 PM

Oh perhaps I just need to look at the bigger picture? Alan I remember that jig and have it saved to my favs but I just want the full function of my tablesaw as I should. :)

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View  woodshaver (Tony)  's profile

woodshaver (Tony)

4002 posts in 2814 days


#11 posted 07-14-2016 02:08 PM

You got me thinking Randy. I did a little search on lubing plastic and found this dry spray lube. It may not be what your looking for but I know if it’s wet lube that’s not good; just make the dust built up and causes more binding.
Reading the description It seems to be just what you need to use on plastic.

-- Tony C UAW, St Augustine FL, My high school shop teacher said "You can do it"... Now I can't stop!

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

419 posts in 1006 days


#12 posted 07-14-2016 02:32 PM



If they are made from teflon (most probably) dont worry. It is selflubricating material and in low frequency scenarios like this do not require extra lubrication.

- Plain

I agree, chances are if they’re plastic gears they’re made of either Teflon or delrin. Both of those materials are self lubricating.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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Plain

157 posts in 159 days


#13 posted 07-14-2016 03:56 PM


( plastic gears) why ? On earth would and do they put them in power tools is beyond me.
- Mrkixx

Maybe because they do not rust, do not need lubrication, do not attract dust. do no chip out like metal, work smoother, easier to make (cheaper), quieter.

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7698 posts in 2303 days


#14 posted 07-14-2016 06:34 PM

Randy,

I recently experienced a problem with gears and I was getting a rumbling noise from my grizzly cabinet saw. Thought the worst . “I’m going to have to replace bearings.” Grizzly even provides a video for this task. While I use to do maintenance on my craftsman once a year I seem to have slipped in that dept. I didn’t have to remove the table which is a beast for one whoosie guy. I had wood chips that had fallen in hard to reach places and my dust collector seems to have less suction. combination of the two produced really hard turning of the wheels to adjust height and angle. Once I had thoroughly cleaned the saw and lubed with silicon spray it was its old self again. Thank the Wood Sprites ! Got to do more regular maintenance. Inside and out. Paste wax??? Only been using it on saw blades and small hand tools to prevent rust, and to wax the table saw top.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

7698 posts in 2303 days


#15 posted 07-14-2016 06:39 PM

Do you have a compressor?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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