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Forum topic by AudibleVelvet posted 07-12-2016 09:51 PM 652 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AudibleVelvet

15 posts in 146 days


07-12-2016 09:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman bandsaw 12 bandsaw

I found a Craftsman 12” bandsaw. They seem to be a dime a dozen and this one’s for $75. Tilt head, 1 1/8 hp, 80 inch blade. Fellow says it works. Should I go for it?


24 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#1 posted 07-12-2016 10:02 PM

Not sure which one you are looking at… but you might want to check out this video over at woodgears about fixing a tilting head C-man bandsaw:

Bandsaw repair fail

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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splatman

557 posts in 858 days


#2 posted 07-12-2016 10:04 PM

If it’s anything like the one in this video, definitely not worth $75.

View AudibleVelvet's profile

AudibleVelvet

15 posts in 146 days


#3 posted 07-12-2016 10:14 PM

I’m a bit daunted now. It’s similar, but looks a decade or two older.

Anyone have suggestions for an inexpensive one? I’m in Philadelphia.

View AudibleVelvet's profile

AudibleVelvet

15 posts in 146 days


#4 posted 07-12-2016 11:00 PM

I’m also seeing a craftsman from around 1940. Is this likely to be a better machine?

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runswithscissors

2173 posts in 1484 days


#5 posted 07-13-2016 01:22 AM

The tilting head has a lot of advantages. For one thing, you don’t have to fight gravity when beveling heavy timbers as you would with a tilted table. Really big ones were used by shipwrights to cut large planks and timbers. The sawyer would call out bevels to an assistant, who would gradually tilt the head to the desired bevel. But those were serious saws.

Unfortunately, Sears took a good idea and botched it by making a piece of junk. I looked one over carefully when they were selling them, and was disgusted at the crude, mismatched castings and flimsy construction overall.

Splatman’s video suggestion is worth a watch. Makes you cringe to see what he does to that saw, though.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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AudibleVelvet

15 posts in 146 days


#6 posted 07-13-2016 01:41 AM

Thanks for talking me down. My head is spinning from all the cheap options. Unfortunately, I have to stick with the cheap options and hope to find a gem.

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AudibleVelvet

15 posts in 146 days


#7 posted 07-13-2016 03:11 AM

I’ve been going about this all wrong. So how about I ask what is a good, safe and inexpensive means to rip up to say, at least 8/4 hardwood stock? If I get that far, I’m good. I know my questions lead to more questions coming back, please bear with me.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7902 posts in 1839 days


#8 posted 07-13-2016 07:22 AM

I looked at one once and it shook like Charlie Sheen in the Betty Ford clinic.

As for ripping, decent bandsaw or tablesaw will do it. I prefer the TS route but others prefer the BS route. If you go bandsaw, you’ll need a jointer (hand or electric) to clean up the edges.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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MustacheMike

172 posts in 1548 days


#9 posted 07-13-2016 09:18 AM

The tilt head 12” was either loved or hated. It was made for about 4 years and could be wrought with problems. Mostly pulley keyway and belt problems. Under sears weird hp rating system many were disappointed with its power and it was very difficult to work on. Parts from sears or aftermarket companies are non existent. But there are a ton of them around for parts.

-- You can trust Mike -" because I will never pull your stash!" See my show weekly at Stumpynubs.com

View toolie's profile

toolie

2022 posts in 2088 days


#10 posted 07-13-2016 11:37 AM



If it s anything like the one in this video, definitely not worth $75.

- splatman

So that’s what happens when a tool pisses off Mathias .

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1906 days


#11 posted 07-13-2016 12:11 PM



Thanks for talking me down. My head is spinning from all the cheap options. Unfortunately, I have to stick with the cheap options and hope to find a gem.

- AudibleVelvet


You are not alone I can assure you, based on the posts and the threads I have been reading, many of us hobby woodworkers rely on or have been relying on cheaper options to keep the dream of owning a woodworking shop alive, and to add to that, to have a very small shop to work with .

As far as a good but inexpensive bandsaw goes, any clone of the old Rockwell/ Delta bandsaw will work, if it is made in Taiwan, it is better , around here we can find one for $120 to $150 ,which is a good but inexpensive alternative to a 14” Laguna lol.
I consider myself blessed to have a small garage (converted to a woodworking shop),with cracked concrete floor every where,but I thank god that it is at least insulated. 90% of my tools are used which I found on local classified (Kijiji)/CL or bought from places like your Harbor Freight (Princess Auto here),my point is you’ll get to where you want to be eventually ,have patience.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#12 posted 07-13-2016 01:48 PM



I ve been going about this all wrong. So how about I ask what is a good, safe and inexpensive means to rip up to say, at least 8/4 hardwood stock? If I get that far, I m good. I know my questions lead to more questions coming back, please bear with me.

- AudibleVelvet

I’ve used a circular saw with a straight edge guide and it works find.

Hard to advise without knowing what, if any, machines you DO have. ;-)

A bandsaw would be best, but you’ll probably end up frustrated using the cheaper type of machine you’re looking at.

I do NOT recommend ripping unjointed rough stock on a table saw.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View jonlruss's profile

jonlruss

97 posts in 573 days


#13 posted 07-13-2016 01:53 PM

I have to agree with Ken: be patient. I had to be talked down from a couple of hunks of junk myself. When I finally did luck out I found a Craftsman 14” that’s about 15 years old for $75. Needed a good cleaning and a few parts, but nothing major. It might not be a Delta or a Rikon but it’s not a Harbor Freight or equivalent either. The junkier models I’d been looking at were of that ilk and needed at least as much work and people were wanting more for them, so there are deals out there.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

1130 posts in 172 days


#14 posted 07-13-2016 02:33 PM

http://allentown.craigslist.org/tls/5673759799.html

that’s one like I have a great saw its been for me …..... probably be able to get it for $100.00

here another one :

http://allentown.craigslist.org/tls/5671577743.html

I would stay far away from 3 wheel ones

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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bandit571

14527 posts in 2142 days


#15 posted 07-13-2016 03:28 PM

I have been using a very different Craftsman 12” bandsaw…it does not tilt…except for the table.

And I have been resawing 4×4s with it.
Model No. 113.243311…..uses an 80” blade.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

showing 1 through 15 of 24 replies

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