LumberJocks

Filling Cracks

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by DBordello posted 07-12-2016 05:33 PM 396 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 686 days


07-12-2016 05:33 PM

Hello,

I am currently working with some walnut that I acquired locally that gave me the honor of warping, and cracking. i Have done the best I can, but I still have some pieces with some decent cracks in them:

I am not worried about the cracks structurally, but I wouldn’t mind cleaning them up a bit aesthetically. I plan to finish with BLO and Arm-R-Seal.

My first thought is to mix epoxy with saw dust and sand flat. Any tips for this procedure, such as the ratio? Other ideas?


11 replies so far

View FLBert's profile

FLBert

21 posts in 197 days


#1 posted 07-12-2016 05:42 PM

I would try either saw dust or maybe some dye mixed with the epoxy. The sawdust would need to be pretty fine stuff I would think. Not sure about ratios, but it looks like it won’t take much so maybe experiment with a small amount on a piece of scrap to see if the color looks right to you before putting it in the crack.

-- Bert, Lake City, FL

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#2 posted 07-12-2016 06:00 PM

There is no one ‘ratio’ and just about anything can be mixed in with epoxy to give it color… sawdust, crushed up colored chalk, powdered and liquid painting pigments, metal shavings, stone dust or even stone chips, shredded fabric material (which is what West System #403 microfiber filler is), etc… Use your imagination. You just don’t want to make it too thick so it won’t flow into the crack. If you decide to use one of those syringe type epoxy things found at the BORG, keep in mind that most have quite a lot of filler in them already, unless you get the clear stuff.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

206 posts in 921 days


#3 posted 07-12-2016 08:56 PM

Well, you can embrace the checks and fill with something colorful. Or you can take a piece of scrap walnut, oil it with the BLO, and power sand the wet oil with a pad sander and 100grit. This will make a saw dust slurry that you can fill the checks with. You have to do it at the same time you oil the rest. When the oil cures, its as hard as the wood and won’t come out?
Test it on some scrap to see how it looks. Its not perfect, but the few time I’ve used it worked out well.
Also, I have alwys used danish oil, not pure BLO.

-- John

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 686 days


#4 posted 07-12-2016 08:56 PM

John,

Excellent idea. I will give that shot.

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

206 posts in 921 days


#5 posted 07-12-2016 09:57 PM

Also, make sure to clean your pad sander berfore the oil dries. It will clog the small dust collection holes.
I had to replace the pad on my makita sander the first time I did this. Live and learn. Lol.

-- John

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2173 posts in 1484 days


#6 posted 07-12-2016 10:02 PM

I prefer sanding dust in my epoxy. If you use walnut dust, the finish—whether oil or some kind of film—will darken considerably compared to the walnut. But I think it would look good. I do this frequently, sometimes for structural reasons, sometimes aesthetic.

The epoxy will run down into the crack like honey through holey hot buttered toast.. If the crack goes through, tape the backside so the epoxy doesn’t run out. Also, try to overfill the hole. It isn’t that the epoxy shrinks, but rather that it will settle into every nook and cranny, and can leave your repair sunken if you don’t top up. When cured (it doesn’t “dry”), sand flush.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2559 posts in 1716 days


#7 posted 07-12-2016 10:59 PM

DBordello, I mix epoxy with a drop of black TransTint dye and overfill the void as scissors mentioned. Here are a couple pix of a work in progress.

I apologize for the glare.

-- Art

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1108 posts in 2403 days


#8 posted 07-13-2016 12:21 AM

I have several items I turned that cracked. I used a bit of plumber’s putty on the end and filled them with clear epoxy. When I show them to people, all they see is the item and not the 1/4” wide gap filled with clear epoxy.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#9 posted 07-13-2016 01:05 AM

You can also use bondo and use color pencils to connect the dark and light grains and make it virtually invisible.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Snowbeast's profile

Snowbeast

61 posts in 797 days


#10 posted 07-13-2016 11:05 AM

Overfill the crack with fine walnut sanding dust and then soak it with thin CA glue. When it’s cured, simply sand it flush with the surrounding surface.

This will look very similar to what Art showed but not quite as pronounced.

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 686 days


#11 posted 07-13-2016 04:38 PM



Overfill the crack with fine walnut sanding dust and then soak it with thin CA glue. When it s cured, simply sand it flush with the surrounding surface.

This will look very similar to what Art showed but not quite as pronounced.

- Snowbeast

I like this idea. I will give that a shot.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com