LumberJocks

favorite time savers

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by treesner posted 07-12-2016 06:32 AM 880 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View treesner's profile

treesner

167 posts in 429 days


07-12-2016 06:32 AM

Curious what things you guys started doing that saved you a lot of time/frustration later?

The simple one that got me thinking about this:
After a glue up I now unscrew the clamps all the way (not just loose enough to take off). Now when clamping a glue up i never run out of threads (avoiding having to unscrew all the way/push closer/re-tighten).


26 replies so far

View Tabletop's profile

Tabletop

77 posts in 212 days


#1 posted 07-12-2016 11:21 AM

1. Document everything. I have a list of notes on each customer. If I need to reproduce anything, I don’t have to figure it out all over again

2. When making raised panel doors, always make extra parts.

3. Know when to step away. When I get tired I tend to make mistakes and accidents happen.

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2724 posts in 2897 days


#2 posted 07-12-2016 11:26 AM

I agree with Tabletop about documentation. In my case, I have a 3 ring binder with instructions on making everything from a simple cutting board to an intricate box. I detail the entire build, most importantly the order in which to make each part. You’d be surprised at how many times you can do a glue-up that should have been done before sanding or how many times you can attach something and then have to take it apart. This binder is my “go to” tool for any projects.

I also clean my shop every day at the end of my day.

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View treesner's profile

treesner

167 posts in 429 days


#3 posted 07-12-2016 03:42 PM



I agree with Tabletop about documentation. In my case, I have a 3 ring binder with instructions on making everything from a simple cutting board to an intricate box. I detail the entire build, most importantly the order in which to make each part. You d be surprised at how many times you can do a glue-up that should have been done before sanding or how many times you can attach something and then have to take it apart. This binder is my “go to” tool for any projects.

I also clean my shop every day at the end of my day.

- ellen35

Would love to see photos of an example project.
Are you writing like ‘1) cut bottom to 25”x15” 2) cut side to..”
or drawing photos of measurements and more general steps?

I’ve been keeping a small notebook where i’m semi tracking the process, like if it’s something out of plywood i figure out the most efficient way to cut out all the pieces and draw that and if the joinery involves many steps i write down the cut list, how i found the measurement and how i set up the table saw in hopes of not having to think so hard about the best way to do it next time

View jbay's profile

jbay

816 posts in 364 days


#4 posted 07-12-2016 03:54 PM

Sand as many pieces parts as possible before assembly.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


#5 posted 07-12-2016 04:14 PM

Took the advice of a seasoned woodworker to try to keep some time to clean up the shop at the end of the day (sweep, vacuum, put up clamps, etc). Of course, this does depend on the the state of ongoing projects. Much better to start the next day (or next weekend as this is my hobby) with less of a mess than the shop tends to turn into while working. Let’s me get rolling much more smoothly.

View jbay's profile

jbay

816 posts in 364 days


#6 posted 07-12-2016 04:21 PM



Took the advice of a seasoned woodworker to try to keep some time to clean up the shop at the end of the day (sweep, vacuum, put up clamps, etc). Of course, this does depend on the the state of ongoing projects. Much better to start the next day (or next weekend as this is my hobby) with less of a mess than the shop tends to turn into while working. Let s me get rolling much more smoothly.

- BB1

Not disagreeing with you at all, it’s nice to come into a clean shop.
(just for conversation)
When I had a shop with employees, I had them clean in the morning. It gave the guys a chance to wake up and get moving and also let them stay on a roll working at the end of the day instead of stopping early to clean.
I believe I got better production this way. It’s hard to walk in and start going gung ho!

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


#7 posted 07-12-2016 04:32 PM


Took the advice of a seasoned woodworker to try to keep some time to clean up the shop at the end of the day (sweep, vacuum, put up clamps, etc). Of course, this does depend on the the state of ongoing projects. Much better to start the next day (or next weekend as this is my hobby) with less of a mess than the shop tends to turn into while working. Let s me get rolling much more smoothly.

- BB1

Not disagreeing with you at all, it s nice to come into a clean shop.
(just for conversation)
When I had a shop with employees, I had them clean in the morning. It gave the guys a chance to wake up and get moving and also let them stay on a roll working at the end of the day instead of stopping early to clean.
I believe I got better production this way. It s hard to walk in and start going gung ho!

- jbay

I’m a “hit the floor running” person so this work for me. Something about everything being back where items belong that makes me feel better when I walk back in the door. Being a hobby woodworker who isn’t able to be in the shop daily is also different than the situation you described. Unless I can get something done in the evening, my sessions are focused on weekends or vacation days.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3686 posts in 1730 days


#8 posted 07-12-2016 04:37 PM

I agree with the sentiment about a clean shop. Another thing is keeping tools organized. Nothing frustrates me more than having to search a tool for a 20-30 minutes.

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 917 days


#9 posted 07-12-2016 04:47 PM

Use the right tool even if you have to go buy it. Nothing wastes more time than trying to get a job done without the ‘correct’ tool(s).

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 203 days


#10 posted 07-12-2016 05:02 PM

In a production environment I like the idea of cleaning in the morning. I wouldn’t have thought about that but as a hobby woodworker I like walking in, sitting at my bench and planning out my day nice and slow so I know what I have going on. This is supposed to be relaxing for me. If I walk in to a mess I would already be behind and anxiety filled.

I clean at the end. I even fill my evap cooler in the summer so it’s ready to go when I walk out the next day or weekend. In AZ I wouldn’t even get to walk out without that.

Love the idea of this thread. Can’t wait to see more tips.

If I were to offer a suggestion, add a sharpening regiment to the cleanup time. If you used a tool run it over a stone a few times at the end of a day. Takes less than a minute and when you get back to work you can start with fresh blades. I started this because I would forget which blades need sharpened and which I hadn’t used when I setup for timed sharpening.

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 203 days


#11 posted 07-12-2016 05:04 PM



Use the right tool even if you have to go buy it. Nothing wastes more time than trying to get a job done without the correct tool(s).

M

- MadMark

I like this too. Woodworking is supposed to be relaxing, nothing less relaxing than not using the right tool for the job and simply getting by for less desirable results.

View treesner's profile

treesner

167 posts in 429 days


#12 posted 07-15-2016 11:08 PM

shop apron, not to keep the clothes clean but so I always have a tape, pencil, square, screwdriver, eye protection, ear plugs at all times.

Keeps things really organized since as soon as i use it, it goes right back to its spot in the apron

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

829 posts in 687 days


#13 posted 07-16-2016 02:05 PM

Sanding/finishing are the jobs for me that take the longest and I despise the most.
Pre-sand as much as possible while parts are flat and can be ganged together for efficiency with a ROS (and avoid rounding over corners). Typically any post-assembly sanding is done with a sanding sponge, fine grit.

Pre finishing is also a big help if the final finish coat will require sanding or steel wool. This makes it easy to do edges and corners that may be hard to reach after assembly. It also helps avoiding cross-grain sanding.
For making the most of a day, I try to get the finish applied at the end of a ‘shift’. That way I won’t be stirring up dust and the parts will be ready for the next step in the morning.

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1466 posts in 2708 days


#14 posted 07-16-2016 02:22 PM

I like this thread. Good ideas.
I clean at the end, since I don’t know when I can get into the shop again, cleaning at the end allows tools to be cleaned and put away so they are ready for the next time.
A time saver?, hmmm, I would say that my biggest time saver in the shop is not getting a chance to get into the shop in the first place. :-(

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1911 days


#15 posted 07-16-2016 03:03 PM

I fill the glue bottle, all my pencils sharpened ,fill glass jars with dowels of different sizes ,marking knives are all attached to magnets on the wall(never in the drawer),hammers,measuring tapes,on a small bench always there ready to go.
The end of each day I make sure all the tools are put away so next time I’m in my shop I don’t have to remember where I “temporarily” had put them.
Clean up is always a quicky ,there’s always sawdust on the floor but not on the assembly table.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com