LumberJocks

Select pine + Everbilt Screws + 18V = some burned screw heads..why?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by 4Zoe posted 07-10-2016 09:52 PM 645 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View 4Zoe's profile

4Zoe

5 posts in 149 days


07-10-2016 09:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: screws select pine

Hi,
So this has to be a super basic question brought up a bunch..
Simply working on 1×2’s, the wood is Clayton/radiata. Screws per guy in youtube are #8, the ones I picked up are flat-head, zinc.
Is that the problem, zinc?
I’m making stretcher bars for painting canvases and spent a lot of time on them beveling etc. now have 3 screws sticking out a bit too far and don’t know what to do with them.
I saw on another post advice for a larger piece but not this sort of thing.
Please advise what to use to avoid this happening and what to do with the problem screws, really only sticking out by the head.
Thanks in advance, and feel free to advise if different forum would be better.


10 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

15665 posts in 2469 days


#1 posted 07-10-2016 09:58 PM

Try running a countersink bit then driving the screw and slow down the speed on the drill. Remove and replace those proud screw after countersinking.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4027 posts in 1814 days


#2 posted 07-10-2016 10:10 PM

Counter sink or counter bore, lubricate the screws w/ beeswax or bar soap.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View 4Zoe's profile

4Zoe

5 posts in 149 days


#3 posted 07-11-2016 10:45 AM

Thanks for your responses, looked also and found youtube vids with various methods.
Think probably the drill speed had something to do with it as I just upgraded to it.
Haven’t been able to get the stripped screws out yet and may have to start all over again – royal pain.
One method which would be good except my frame pieces wouldn’t support it I think was turning with a screwdriver and hitting with a hammer to jolt turn them out.

Also I don’t know if select pine when put at right angles to eachother goes against the grain and makes it much tougher. Lubricating the screws would probably help and I’ll try it, but seems like a lot of extra work on getting screws through what’s supposed to be a softer wood. And will look at countersinking too.
Guess it could be either doing that or going with premium screws, first will try slowing drill.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

15665 posts in 2469 days


#4 posted 07-11-2016 01:27 PM

If you need to screw things together at right angles look into pocket holes. Much much easier. A small kreg pocket hole jig would run ya about $20.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2192 posts in 944 days


#5 posted 07-11-2016 01:38 PM

You need to use a drill/counter sink bit, preferably tapered, even in a soft wood like pine. No need for wax in soft wood with steel screws.

I like these.

Also, a cordless drill on low speed is best. If you’re using an electric drill, they are not the best for driving screws because in soft wood when the screw bottoms out it will strip in a heartbeat. In hard wood it just tries to break your wrist ;-)

To get the stripped screws out, remove the board and you can push down on the screw while screwing backwards when the threads engage it will come right out.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

694 posts in 850 days


#6 posted 07-11-2016 03:36 PM

Pilot holes and counter sink bit will make your life much easier. If using a drill to drive them make sure you set the clutch so it slips to avoid damaging screw or wood. It is also best if your drill is variable speed so you can go slower. You can do the final drive by hand if necessary. Also, I try to use square or Torx drive screws whenever possible, Phillips head if they are are not available and never slotted unless aesthetics calls for it (avoid using a drill to drive slotted screws).

If your screw heads are damaged and you can’t drive them in or remove them, you can try cutting a slot with a dremel and use a slotted screwdriver to remove. Or go get yourself a damaged screw extractor bit set. These work by drilling a small hole in the head of the screw and then the extractor bit will grab inside the hole to remove the screw using your drill (variable speed drill is is best).

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View 4Zoe's profile

4Zoe

5 posts in 149 days


#7 posted 07-11-2016 03:57 PM

Hi, thanks so much for all the helpful responses!
Will relay my experience in case useful at some point.
I actually went to a Home Depot this am, the tool-guy went over it all with me. Recommended a vise grip – the $9 Husky one to extract the screws – worked like a charm TG!
Turned out likely the bit I was using was too narrow as well as the force of the drill.
Showed me how impact drills are better but said with mine just swipe some soap down the screw, said the ones I had would be fine though personally he uses sheet-metal screws for wood.
Have now removed and replaced the ones I had. So far so good.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4451 posts in 3423 days


#8 posted 07-11-2016 04:02 PM

Don’t use soap on a screw. It will lead to corrosion. I use a toilet bowl wax ring. Super cheap, lasts forever, won’t degrade the screw.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View 4Zoe's profile

4Zoe

5 posts in 149 days


#9 posted 07-11-2016 04:36 PM

Ok great thanks good to know!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

694 posts in 850 days


#10 posted 07-11-2016 06:38 PM

Personally, I don’t like impact drivers. I’ve damaged more screws and work pieces with them than anything else. As long as you drill a pilot hole and your drill has a clutch or is at least variable speed, the drill will usually work just fine. In my opinion, impact drivers are best for construction grade work, not for cabinetry or other finer wood working.

My 2 cents.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com