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warped stiles

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Forum topic by StiltzWi posted 07-10-2016 12:03 PM 367 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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StiltzWi

34 posts in 246 days


07-10-2016 12:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak planer jointer router tablesaw joining milling

I bought some 8/4 red oak plain sawn (because of price) milled it with joiner to get two sides flat and square then ran it through a thickness planer on the other side to get it to 1 3/8” by 4.75” then noticed that they both warped along the face. the bottom rail is 9” locking rail 7.75” and top rail is 4.75” if I glue these up using M&T joints will that straighten them out? The lumber has been sitting in my basement for two weeks getting acclimated. I know there is moisture down there but it is a walkout so it’s not too bad. I might try and plane on both sides next time to see if that helps?


10 replies so far

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bbasiaga

757 posts in 1461 days


#1 posted 07-10-2016 12:39 PM

Did they cup or twist? If you lay it out on a flat surface, how hard is it to flatten by hand? By that I mean how hard to you have to push down on it to get it to flatten out?

The risk of trying to attach it to the legs and pull it straight that way is that it will spring the system and the legs wont stay in a plane. Then your table will wobble. If your joints are loose enough that you can get them back apart, and tight enough that they’ll stay together without glue, you could always try it.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#2 posted 07-10-2016 02:43 PM

Sorry to hear that dude. I’ve been there. I’m going to say something that you won’t want to hear. I did as you did a long time ago and tried numerous things to remedy the situation. thought I had it licked and after the piece was done it still warped and I had to remake an entire door.

Cut your loses now. Buy QS for rails and stiles. I have found that if you have to buy flat sawn buy wide boards and more than likely you will have QS edges and can take that materail from the left and right side.

End the end you will save your self a lot of heart ache to just do it right and learn! QS for R&S .

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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StiltzWi

34 posts in 246 days


#3 posted 07-10-2016 09:56 PM

I am waiting for some stock guides to come in I have them clamped together with a wedge in between. I can always hope! might finish cutting this door and see what the dry fit looks like. If I don’t like it I will have to do something, I have 9 to11 doors to build, hope the rest of this stock does not warp like these did yesterday. Would hate to think I have 250BF of 8/4 red oak that I can’t use for these doors.

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chrisstef

15673 posts in 2472 days


#4 posted 07-10-2016 10:10 PM

Your last line …. Plane both sides of the board for sure. If you dont youre only exposing one side of the board to moisture. It’ll bow on ya every time if you dont.

Mill it once. Let it sit a few days and then mill it again to your final dimensions.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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StiltzWi

34 posts in 246 days


#5 posted 07-10-2016 11:07 PM

That’s the plan for the rest of the doors. Might also just use the wood that’s milled down already for mullions and rails.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#6 posted 07-10-2016 11:10 PM

What was the moisture content when you started ?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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StiltzWi

34 posts in 246 days


#7 posted 07-10-2016 11:12 PM

That I don’t know for sure as I bought it 2 weeks ago from a hardwood supplier, I know it was all kiln dried.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#8 posted 07-10-2016 11:20 PM

That could be the problem ,the’res kiln dried and then there’s kiln dried or like others have said if you plan it you do a light skim plan on both sides.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#9 posted 07-10-2016 11:20 PM



Your last line …. Plane both sides of the board for sure. If you dont youre only exposing one side of the board to moisture. It ll bow on ya every time if you dont.

Mill it once. Let it sit a few days and then mill it again to your final dimensions.

- chrisstef

Yep. Critical when using rough wood. Surface it and let it do what it does. Then do final dimensioning.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#10 posted 07-11-2016 02:38 PM

I think your problem started with the milling. You have to mill in increments taking nor more than 1/8” off both sides equally. Sticker and let sit in climate controlled area or plastic bags for 3-4 days, then repeat the process. I generally leave my stock about 1/32 over sized and hand plane just before assembling.

Even with that, you can have a board that won’t behave due to internal stresses, not moisture.
Either way, keeping them clamped will not help.

In these cases, a great option to use is splining. Look for it in the Charles Neil video series on the pie safe build. It has saved my butt more than once!

Basically you extend the inside groove where the panel goes very deep to within 1/8 of the edge, then fill with wood and use a stiff setting glue like epoxy or TBIII. Then clamp down to flat surface.

Works every time!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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