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Diablo blade with Sawstop

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Forum topic by Plain posted 07-08-2016 09:13 PM 511 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Plain

157 posts in 166 days


07-08-2016 09:13 PM

Thin kerf Diablo blades come with something called Permashield coat, i do know what it is but my guess it is just teflon. Maybe I did not look hard but I could not find anything in the saw manual regarding these blades. My guess is the teflon coat could interfere with passing electric current from the blade to the arbor, but if so it should be printed in large letters on the top of the saw. So I guess it is safe.


5 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#1 posted 07-08-2016 09:39 PM

Sawstop machines have a lot of limitations for blade choice. They specifically state in their FAQ that Steel blades or dado stacks with a coating can inhibit the safety mechanisms ability to function properly. Blades with a non-conductive hub or teeth (such as a diamond blade) should not be used. Or blades with a depth limiting shoulder. Or thin kerf blades less than 3/32” in width (which that Diablo blade appears to be). Or any blades that are thicker than 3/16”. Or a wobble dado or dado stack with solid interior chippers. Or a moulding head cutter. Or anything other than a 10” blade or 8” dado stack up to 13/16” wide – so using 7.25” blades are out as well.

Your best bet is to ask Sawstop directly…

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Plain

157 posts in 166 days


#2 posted 07-08-2016 10:17 PM

The guys at SawStop says no problemo, half of their customers use this blade.
Just if someone needs this info.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

759 posts in 1463 days


#3 posted 07-08-2016 11:06 PM

What SS says about those blades is that they may not stop as effectively. The thin kerf blades don’t have the strength to survive it is my guess. Smaller blades, though I’ve never really had the need to use them, is kind of a big question mark in my mind. The main problem is that the smaller blades can’t get close enough to the brake mechanism. They could make more money by making more breaks that fit different sized blades…but I suppose there could be another engineering reason they don’t.

You can always test a coated blade by putting it on the arbor, turning the main power on the saw (not starting the motor..just turning on the power), and touching it. If the red light goes crazy, it will work.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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clin

514 posts in 464 days


#4 posted 07-08-2016 11:14 PM



What SS says about those blades is that they may not stop as effectively. The thin kerf blades don t have the strength to survive it is my guess. Smaller blades, though I ve never really had the need to use them, is kind of a big question mark in my mind. The main problem is that the smaller blades can t get close enough to the brake mechanism. They could make more money by making more breaks that fit different sized blades…but I suppose there could be another engineering reason they don t.

You can always test a coated blade by putting it on the arbor, turning the main power on the saw (not starting the motor..just turning on the power), and touching it. If the red light goes crazy, it will work.

Brian

- bbasiaga

SawStops have an adjustment to set the distance from the brake to the blade. So you can account for variations from the standard 10” diameter blade or 8” dado blades. The adjustment is somewhere in the range of 1/16 – 1/8” so 2X that for the diameter.

I mostly use Freud blades and find these run a little smaller, but I can adjust the brake distance as needed.

I think if you had a blade large or smaller by 1/4”, you’d start to run into problems, but dang, if someone can’t make a 10” blade within a tolerance of +/-1/4”, I don’t think I’d want their blade anyway.

-- Clin

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Plain

157 posts in 166 days


#5 posted 07-08-2016 11:43 PM


What SS says about those blades is that they may not stop as effectively. The thin kerf blades don t have the strength to survive it is my guess. Smaller blades, though I ve never really had the need to use them, is kind of a big question mark in my mind. The main problem is that the smaller blades can t get close enough to the brake mechanism. They could make more money by making more breaks that fit different sized blades…but I suppose there could be another engineering reason they don t.

You can always test a coated blade by putting it on the arbor, turning the main power on the saw (not starting the motor..just turning on the power), and touching it. If the red light goes crazy, it will work.

Brian

- bbasiaga

Not absolutely true.

1. The kerf of the mentioned blade is in the Sawstop recommended specs.
2. Testing the blade yourself is the worst possible approach. If the blade surface is not conductive it still can work during the test as the blade can touch the arbor shaft. Then once in a while you might get some dust speck on the shaft and since the arbor hole in the blade has some rather large tolerance it might happen that the blade does not have contact with the arbor shaft, only with the flange via the coated surface. In that case you are screwed by the arbor screw.

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