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Forum topic by Brian Gulotta posted 07-07-2016 08:06 PM 395 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brian Gulotta

51 posts in 419 days


07-07-2016 08:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane iron moving

I have picked up and restored a Stanley #4 smoothing plane. There is some chipping at the bottom of one of the legs on the frog. I’ve noticed after making a pass or two the iron shifts up on the side where this damage is. Could this be related to this chipping or could it just be due to a lever cap screw that needs to be tightened?


8 replies so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13715 posts in 2080 days


#1 posted 07-07-2016 08:29 PM

I’d not think a chipped frog would translate into a shifting cutter/cap iron. If the cutter assy is right, it should make plenty of contact across the surface of the frog. A tighter cap screw is an easy-to-try solution. Give it a quarter turn and see what happens. Repeat or back off as necessary.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Brian Gulotta

51 posts in 419 days


#2 posted 07-07-2016 09:49 PM

Thanks Smitty. I’ll give it a whirl.

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 201 days


#3 posted 07-07-2016 11:56 PM

Let us know how it works out. I love troubleshooting this stuff. Flat frog? Flat blade? flat surface for the frog to sit on? Lots of things so please report back, it could help others in the future.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3112 posts in 1423 days


#4 posted 07-08-2016 12:16 AM

Most likely Smitty’s solution will solve it. Especially if the frog doesn’t rock at all when you try. If tightening the cap screw doesn’t work get some prussian blue and mark either the frog or base carefully and then press them together to see if there is a good mating surface. If not, you can either file them carefully or use valve grinding compound to get them to seat better together. I’ve only ever tried filling and it worked really well, but is a bit tricky.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

754 posts in 1457 days


#5 posted 07-08-2016 01:04 AM

I’m actually dealing with this same problem on a #7 I recently picked up. The frog is solid in the base, and when I dye mark the face of the frog that mates with the iron – then run the frog across sandpaper on a flat reference surface, it has a large, very flat section from the bottom about 1/2 to 2/3 up. When I put the iron in and wiggle it about, there are only two tiny spots where it contacts. This means my iron is warped. I did have to do a lot of flattening to get it sharp, but it is appears to be far enough out up its length to be causing a problem. I’m going to tighten the screw and see what happens. But I think a new iron may be in my future.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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Brian Gulotta

51 posts in 419 days


#6 posted 07-08-2016 01:38 AM

Thanks for all your ideas. I’m going to take a closer look at the plane tomorrow to see if I can’t diagnose the problem. I’ll let you know what I find.

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Brian Gulotta

51 posts in 419 days


#7 posted 07-09-2016 01:50 AM

So I took the plane apart and tested all surfaces with prussian blue and everything looked good. So I put everything back together and haven’t noticed any issues. Perhaps it was just the cap iron screw or maybe the frog wasn’t seated properly.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13715 posts in 2080 days


#8 posted 07-09-2016 12:56 PM

Hey, good news!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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