LumberJocks

New/old Arkansas stone question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by Bill White posted 07-06-2016 03:06 PM 409 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


07-06-2016 03:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Just received my Arkansas stone from Aiden 1112. Considering the age and the miles, it is in pretty good shape for the shape that it is in. Lots of oil and dirt on the box, some glaze on the stone, but no real issues, and the price was RIGHT. Have ya checked on the prices out there for Ark. stones?
Now to the question?
What’s the best way to flatten this puppy? Its not bad at all, but my OCD side wants it dead flat.
I do not have diamond plates.
TIA.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us


9 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

692 posts in 1264 days


#1 posted 07-06-2016 03:37 PM

If you figure out how to flatten your stone let us know asap.I tryd a diamond plate on mine and it dulled the diamonds and hardly wore the stone.

View screwikea's profile

screwikea

19 posts in 1406 days


#2 posted 07-06-2016 05:25 PM

The trick is finding something harder than your stone and as flat as you want. If I had it all to do over, I’d buy a DMT lapping plate, but, frankly, I’ve got a couple of really old stones that I can’t flatten. At all. If I want to use them I have to use them exactly how a guy 70 years ago would have – live with the fact that it’s dished and have a curved profile on the blade. I, like you, want flat stuff, though.

I’ve generally had pretty good luck with pavers used for landscaping or cinder blocks. Some people say they use their garage floors, but I’ve had zero luck with that since the concrete in a garage floor is surfaced without a lot of raised grit to it. I’ve got a paver I used specifically for flattening certain stuff.

If you aren’t getting the results that you want there, I’d get a coarse piece of nice belt sander paper and stick it to MDF or glass (like the scary sharp method) and try that. But… if that stone is hard enough don’t count on it working.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#3 posted 07-06-2016 06:33 PM

In the process of using a granite plate and wet/dry paper w/ lube.
Will let ya know.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Slemi's profile

Slemi

103 posts in 1007 days


#4 posted 07-06-2016 07:28 PM

Maybe go to your local tombstone maker and ask if the can grind/polish it?

View TMGStudioFurniture's profile

TMGStudioFurniture

55 posts in 285 days


#5 posted 07-07-2016 12:47 AM

I never really understood the appeal of those stones, especially now that there are diamond stones available cheaply.

Diamond stones cut pretty much everything, they always stay flat, and they don’t cost much anymore either. They come in most any grit you want, or at least realistically need, for woodworking tools.

You can get perfect, dead flat, diamond stones on ebay for under $20. Or, you can tear your hair out trying to resurrect that old Arkansas stone.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/TMGStudioFurniture

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#6 posted 07-07-2016 01:45 PM

WHAT HAIR??? That ship sailed long ago. :)
The 180 wet/dry paper is doing the job. Using it with mineral spirits. I would have started with 120, but not available locally. Slow for sure, but getting the job done. A bit more today and I’m finished.
I have diamond paddles, ceramic stones, a Makita wet sharpener, but the old man who lives inside me just wanted a decent oil stone. The smoother I get with this one, the lighter the color becomes. Now it is about a coffee with lots of cream. This is gonna be a good worker stone.
Thanks Robert. Some work, but a value to me.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 292 days


#7 posted 07-07-2016 05:14 PM

Some of the guys out there have been doing certain things for a very long time and have gotten VERY good at that specific approach and it simply works for them. There is a butt for every seat so to speak. I however do agree that diamond stones are less headache and quite a beautiful thing to use, however they do eventually wear out, (I sharpen ALOT of irons and pretty darn frequently and do go through stones a little quicker than your average bear) the biggest advantage to a stone like Bill has is it will definitely outlast the diamond stones I use everyday. That being said its highly unlikely I’d change my current approach because its how I do things and would have a hard time telling someone with the talent and experience that Mr. White has to change his ways just because I do it differently. We all learn something from each other hence the point in the LJ community.


I never really understood the appeal of those stones, especially now that there are diamond stones available cheaply.

Diamond stones cut pretty much everything, they always stay flat, and they don t cost much anymore either. They come in most any grit you want, or at least realistically need, for woodworking tools.

You can get perfect, dead flat, diamond stones on ebay for under $20. Or, you can tear your hair out trying to resurrect that old Arkansas stone.

- TMGStudioFurniture

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#8 posted 07-07-2016 05:32 PM

OOPS! I meant to post Aiden 1211. Brain is in neutral?
MISTER White???? I got a promotion?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1787 posts in 604 days


#9 posted 07-07-2016 07:29 PM



WHAT HAIR??? That ship sailed long ago. :)
The 180 wet/dry paper is doing the job. Using it with mineral spirits. I would have started with 120, but not available locally. Slow for sure, but getting the job done. A bit more today and I m finished.
I have diamond paddles, ceramic stones, a Makita wet sharpener, but the old man who lives inside me just wanted a decent oil stone. The smoother I get with this one, the lighter the color becomes. Now it is about a coffee with lots of cream. This is gonna be a good worker stone.
Thanks Robert. Some work, but a value to me.
Bill

- Bill White

I recently flattened my hard black AS by the same method but used 120 grit AlOx to flatten then smoothed it up with some wet/dry paper. The 120 took it down FAST.

FWIW, I use diamond plates for sharpening but I find a hard black gives a finer edge than my super-fine ez-lap stone.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com