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Contractor Vs Hybrid Table Saw Are These One In The Same?

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Forum topic by Blackie_ posted 07-06-2016 01:33 PM 1733 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackie_

4530 posts in 1972 days


07-06-2016 01:33 PM

I am curious if there’s a difference between these two saws or are they both pretty much the same just depending on how someone wants to refer to it as?

I’ve been thinking of replacing my current saw at some point which is referred to as a hybrid but when I look at other manufactures they seem to refer to theirs as contractor saws.

For example the Powermatic Model 64B-30

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs


22 replies so far

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Blackie_

4530 posts in 1972 days


#1 posted 07-06-2016 01:38 PM

Seems as though I asked too soon, I found this during my search.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/33473

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1810 days


#2 posted 07-06-2016 02:03 PM

The PM 64B is a contractor saw, the PM 1000 is a hybrid, and the PM 2000 is a cabinet saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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hokiejz

5 posts in 167 days


#3 posted 07-06-2016 02:13 PM

Little authority here, but been shopping a lot over the past year. I’d kind-of call that PM64b a contractor-style hybrid saw or maybe a hybrid-style contractor saw. It does have some non-contractor-saw features:
-inboard motor
-”table”-mounted trunnions
-cast iron table
-chromed-out handwheels
But is missing one big thing usually seen in hybrid saws: longer cabinet with some kind of dust collection.

Someone will no doubt correct me if I’m wrong, but:
Contractor saws historically have outboard motors hanging off the back, lesser quality materials, table-mounted trunnions, less accurate fence, less capable dust collection. But they’re much lighter and more transportable, and “accurate enough for construction”.
Cabinet saws have more powerful, inboard motors, usually very heavy, quality materials, cabinet-mounted trunnions, sturdy accurate fence, and fully enclosed cabinet with interior baffles and dust collection.
Hybrid saws are in between.

The manufacturers have blurred the lines. You have to look at the features you want, rather than the category label now.

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Blackie_

4530 posts in 1972 days


#4 posted 07-06-2016 02:33 PM

This is my current saw Hitachi c1 c10fl which is classified as a hybrid, to me it resembles a contractor saw hence the reason I asked this question. It has an in-house motor, cast iron table, belt driven and has a 2” dust port. Yet it’s on casters.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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Plain

157 posts in 158 days


#5 posted 07-06-2016 06:17 PM

Hybrid is a contractor saw trunnions and motor put in a cabinet.

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#6 posted 07-06-2016 06:45 PM

contractor saw has table mounted trunnions
motor hangs off the back
generally has open back and open legs for a stand
Not really set up for dust collection
most have cast iron tables
usually a smaller table with bolt on extensions
fence may or may not be as accurate as cabinet saw
quality of materials is generally good or better.
contractors saw were originally designed for transport to jobsites, were lighter than a cabinet saw over time they have become heavier and have been replaced by jobsite saws on the job.
they generally come with 1 or 1.5 horse motors

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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knotscott

7206 posts in 2835 days


#7 posted 07-06-2016 08:47 PM

I think it’s important to note that there are really no well defined and agreed upon definitions of saw types. Some feel that the a full enclosure equates to a cabinet saw, some feel that the trunnion mounting define the type, some look to the motor location for guidance. Since the clever engineers and marketers are now producing saws with cabinet mounted trunnions that are lighter duty with a different mounting system than industrial cabinet saws (ie: pm2000, unisaw, ICS, G1023, etc), even that identifier now has loopholes and can need further investigation before drawing conclusions. It makes sense that any saw that combines traits of a contractor saw and a cabinet saw are hybrids, but its worth noting that their are entry level, mid level, and high end hybrid saws. We all seem to have our own definitions, but in the end, it’s the manufacturers….most often the market departments, who call their saws whatever they want.

http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/32154

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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knotscott

7206 posts in 2835 days


#8 posted 07-06-2016 10:56 PM

Edit to post #7 above:

As an example of lower grade cabinet mounted trunnions, the pic below easily says those proverbial 1000 words!

The trunnions above do make the alignment process easier, but they’re really no more robust than typical table mounted trunnions found on the old style contractor saws, and should never be confused with the beefy cabinet mounted trunnions found on something like the PM2000, Unisaw, G1023, Jet Xacta, SS ICS, etc.:

Some of the better hybrid saws do offer a decent compromise in the “new look cabinet mounted trunnions”, sporting some beefier components (Laguna Fusion, PM1000, Jet Proshop, G0771, etc), but are still a far cry from the massive industrial cabinet trunnions shown above: (If any of you G0771 owners ever take the top off, please snap a pic and post…I suspect they’re similar to the Fusions, but have yet to see a good pic)

The Fusion, PM1000, G0771, and Baileigh even throw a full enclosure into the mix, so it could be reasonably argued that they are cabinet saws, but my take is that they’re still not made on par with the heavier duty industrial saws. My advice is to look beyond just the listed features.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Edwardnorton

181 posts in 1386 days


#9 posted 07-06-2016 10:59 PM

Despite what manufactures call their models of table saws, a “true” contractor table saw is one that is easily portable. Hence the description it is portable so contractors (like myself-30+ years) can move them from job to job when needed. Not much help on the comparison of the saws you asked about but a clarification none the less.

-- EdwardNorton

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Blackie_

4530 posts in 1972 days


#10 posted 07-07-2016 12:59 AM

Thanks for that link Knotscot. Very helpful.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#11 posted 07-07-2016 01:06 AM

Despite what manufactures call their models of table saws, a “true” contractor table saw is one that is easily portable. Hence the description it is portable so contractors (like myself-30+ years) can move them from job to job when needed. Not much help on the comparison of the saws you asked about but a clarification none the less.
- Edwardnorton

I would consider those as portable jobsite saws. A contractor saw is one step up from them and gets rid of the universal motors, aluminium tops and plastic housings.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Tooch

1344 posts in 1335 days


#12 posted 07-07-2016 01:16 AM

Randy, have you checked out the saw stop model? I think they now have the option to include a sliding table, something i thought went by the wayside a few years back

-- "Well, the world needs ditch-diggers too..." - Judge Smails

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Blackie_

4530 posts in 1972 days


#13 posted 07-07-2016 01:18 AM

I can See how portable job site and contractor can be misleading.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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Tooch

1344 posts in 1335 days


#14 posted 07-07-2016 01:22 AM

Check that last.post. they offer a portable jobsite saw for around $1300, a contractor saw for around $1500, but the sliding table seems to only be an attachment for cabinet saws. Again, I would do some more research on it if you are even he slightest bit interested

-- "Well, the world needs ditch-diggers too..." - Judge Smails

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Blackie_

4530 posts in 1972 days


#15 posted 07-07-2016 01:25 AM

Tooch if and when that time comes I’m weighing between powermatic and the SS, I’ll have to see what type and compare the inner gearing for blade tilt things like that.

My current hatchi CL10 has plastic blade tilt gears, They are dirty and making it difficult to turn I plan on taking a panel off and seeing if I can clean and lube them. Depending on how that goes….

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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