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Best Cornhole Plans for Woodworkers?

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Forum topic by nogeel posted 07-05-2016 05:05 AM 983 views 2 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nogeel

68 posts in 533 days


07-05-2016 05:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cornhole design question tip

Most plans for cornhole seem to be aimed at non-woodworkers wanting to make the simplest cheapest cornhole boards possible using may pocket hole jig 2×4 and plywood. I was curious what folks have done when they have a complete shop. What material make sense to spend extra money? My current thought is potentially box joints and a rabbet to inset the plywood top.

I was just curious how nice and how far folks have gone to make them?

-- Jeff, Tennessee


16 replies so far

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1193 days


#1 posted 07-05-2016 01:09 PM

My advise would be to keep your guard up and be prepared to use fisticuffs you think you might be on the receiving end…. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Redoak49

1951 posts in 1452 days


#2 posted 07-05-2016 01:39 PM

I used 2×4 but found good ones that I planned little on each side and ripped square. I used butt joints and deck screws for joints. The plywood used was Aruaco ply which is a very good plywood with good surface and almost no voids. I also used a primer and very good exterior paint.

I would not use a rabbit joint as it will leave a seam for the bags to catch on. Could you use box joints or dovetails or something like that….yes…but why. Mine is just butt joints but they fit well and it looks good.

But like everything else in woodworking, make it the way you want. The goal is to have a game to play unless you want to make a piece to show off your skills.

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ste6168

250 posts in 635 days


#3 posted 07-05-2016 01:51 PM

I have built sets with maple frames, planed to 3/4” and 1/2” maple veneered ply. However, no special joints or anything. TBIII glue and kreg jig together, and I also build my sets to be “nesting.” One frame is inset about 3/4” so that the boards fit inside on another. There is nothing really crazy about my sets, except they are nesting and slightly nicer materials. I have built about 5/6 sets in the past several years. I would care if I never built another.

If I ever have enough spare time though, I would love to build a truly nice set, similar to the Colter Atelier boards. They are beautiful, but come at a cost.

http://www.colteratelier.com/


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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1636 days


#4 posted 07-05-2016 02:10 PM

You are making it. I would make it from whatever I wanted and use whatever joinery I wanted. I really like the one ste168 has shown.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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GR8HUNTER

1135 posts in 176 days


#5 posted 07-05-2016 02:16 PM



I have built sets with maple frames, planed to 3/4” and 1/2” maple veneered ply. However, no special joints or anything. TBIII glue and kreg jig together, and I also build my sets to be “nesting.” One frame is inset about 3/4” so that the boards fit inside on another. There is nothing really crazy about my sets, except they are nesting and slightly nicer materials. I have built about 5/6 sets in the past several years. I would care if I never built another.

If I ever have enough spare time though, I would love to build a truly nice set, similar to the Colter Atelier boards. They are beautiful, but come at a cost.

http://www.colteratelier.com/


- ste6168

is that a bubble level inlaid into it ?

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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ste6168

250 posts in 635 days


#6 posted 07-05-2016 05:39 PM


I have built sets with maple frames, planed to 3/4” and 1/2” maple veneered ply. However, no special joints or anything. TBIII glue and kreg jig together, and I also build my sets to be “nesting.” One frame is inset about 3/4” so that the boards fit inside on another. There is nothing really crazy about my sets, except they are nesting and slightly nicer materials. I have built about 5/6 sets in the past several years. I would care if I never built another.

If I ever have enough spare time though, I would love to build a truly nice set, similar to the Colter Atelier boards. They are beautiful, but come at a cost.

http://www.colteratelier.com/


- ste6168

is that a bubble level inlaid into it ?

- GR8HUNTER

You are correct. Their sets sell for like 3k. Check out their website. Pretty wild, honestly. I personally would be scared to play cornhole on them, would just want to look at them.

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muleskinner

881 posts in 1900 days


#7 posted 07-05-2016 05:52 PM

Hmmm … $2750 with tax for me. Free shipping, so there is that.

Truly, some people DO have too much money.

-- Visualize whirled peas

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Tideline77

58 posts in 235 days


#8 posted 07-05-2016 11:34 PM

What method is used to make the circle ?
Would you laminate a square piece from small stock and then cut the circle out ?

If yes ?

What method to cut a perfect circle ? Inside and outside ?
A band saw with a narrow blade ?
Then sanded inside and out side the circle ?

If you don’t mind a rookie question ?

View emilime75's profile

emilime75

4 posts in 153 days


#9 posted 07-06-2016 12:45 AM

Hey, folks, new guy here and this is my first post.

Just thought I’d share the last project I’ve completed which is a set of corn hole boards. Built from Amber Plyboo, aluminum inserts, sprayed with clear lacquer in satin. I planned on doing more with the aluminum, but I ran into difficulties and out of time. These were a house warming present for good friends.


What method is used to make the circle ?

If you don t mind a rookie question ?

- Tideline77

Tideline, I find it best to cut circles using a router with a straight bit and a circle jig. I use the Jasper.

View nogeel's profile

nogeel

68 posts in 533 days


#10 posted 07-06-2016 01:35 AM

Are these guys using solid wood? How are they keeping the joints in the frame and panel tight without any expansion?

http://www.colteratelier.com/

-- Jeff, Tennessee

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Tideline77

58 posts in 235 days


#11 posted 07-06-2016 02:05 AM

Looks great Emilime75

Thanks for the info also

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Rick M

7913 posts in 1843 days


#12 posted 07-06-2016 03:15 AM

Don’t skimp on the top. Too thin and it will be a trampoline, the bean bags will bounce right off.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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nogeel

68 posts in 533 days


#13 posted 07-06-2016 05:06 AM

I ended up watching the video on their site and answered my own question. They used plywood and made a book and slip matched veneer on the top and the bottom.

The interesting thing about their video is it made me think of a cornhole board as nothing more than a table with two legs and a hole it it. The video on how they make the boards is worth a watch. Still can’t imagine paying $2,400 for cornhole boards, but it is well made.

-- Jeff, Tennessee

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nogeel

68 posts in 533 days


#14 posted 07-06-2016 06:05 AM

The PlyBoo looks awesome BTW.

-- Jeff, Tennessee

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nogeel

68 posts in 533 days


#15 posted 07-08-2016 03:36 AM

Any tips on cutting a circular inlay for around the hole?

-- Jeff, Tennessee

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