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Accidentally dyed floor purple! Help!

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Forum topic by Cathie posted 07-04-2016 12:42 PM 1685 views 2 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cathie

13 posts in 157 days


07-04-2016 12:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: vinegar steel wool hardwood flooring purple iron acetate help

Hi y’all, I’m new to this site and forums in general. I’ve accidentally dyed my whole floor purple, I had it sanded professionally then I applied a steel wool and vinegar stain to the wood hoping for a light grey. I didn’t test patch, I didn’t water down, I should have, we all make mistakes, what’s done is done, any ideas on how to fix it? It’s Tassie oak or Vic ash (Australian hardwood). I would still like the result to be not too dark, am thinking of going over it with a mix polyurethane tinted with Jarrah and golden oak because those tones would help counteract the purple.. I was hoping for some kind of (hopefully natural) water based solution.. Any ideas? Thanks in advance – Cathie


37 replies so far

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waho6o9

7175 posts in 2042 days


#1 posted 07-04-2016 12:50 PM

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CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3336 days


#2 posted 07-04-2016 01:07 PM

What you have is an iron stain, oxcylic acid AKA deck brighter should kill it and get you back to raw wood, http://www.walmart.com/search/?query=wood%20bleach%20oxalic&typeahead=wood%20bleach

you will probably need to do a light sand with some 180 or 220 after it dries to remove some raised fiber, but its quick and easy, just give it a good hand sanding with the grain .

When your done bleaching wipe it down with a solution of 1 tablespoon of baking soda to 1 qt of water to neutralize the bleach .

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4034 posts in 1816 days


#3 posted 07-04-2016 01:21 PM

Experiment on scraps until you get the look you want. Then do the floor.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#4 posted 07-04-2016 01:25 PM

Cathie
You lucked out with the first answer from Charles Neil, he is a finishing expert of many years experience and has taught classes and written books on the subject of finishing.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Cathie

13 posts in 157 days


#5 posted 07-04-2016 02:05 PM

Thanks guys, Charles, I shall have a look round to see if I can find a simular product available in australia. Your input is much appreciated gentlmen. Thank you!

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Cathie

13 posts in 157 days


#6 posted 07-04-2016 02:09 PM

Charles, are you able to please tell me if this product would suffice? https://www.bunnings.com.au/intergrain-4l-reviva-timber-cleaner_p1563243
It’s available at my local hardware store.

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CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3336 days


#7 posted 07-04-2016 02:19 PM

Cathie,

Looks like it should do the trick,

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

93 posts in 1178 days


#8 posted 07-04-2016 02:44 PM

Paint the walls a complimentary color, or get a gold couch and rent to an LSU fan. Just make sure you get a deposit.

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2325 days


#9 posted 07-04-2016 03:36 PM



Paint the walls a complimentary color, or get a gold couch and rent to an LSU fan. Just make sure you get a deposit.

- Sawdust2012


Probably not too many LSU fans in Australia.

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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BigTreeBC

8 posts in 170 days


#10 posted 07-04-2016 04:06 PM

I’ve played around a bit with the steel wool and vinegar solution and the colour you get seems to depend partly on how long you let it sit ( how much metal you dissolve into the solution) and what the wood wants to do. As mentioned it’s all about testing on scrap first to see what the colour comes out as.

I’ve stained directly over the mix before with good results but you can’t go lighter.

I don’t mind the current look.

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CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3336 days


#11 posted 07-04-2016 05:08 PM

Keep us posted, will be out of the loop for a week or so, but then we can talk about achieving “grey” or is it Gray.

In either case its hard to achieve, a photo of what your looking to achieve would help alot .

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#12 posted 07-04-2016 05:32 PM



Keep us posted, will be out of the loop for a week or so, but then we can talk about achieving “grey” or is it Gray.

In either case its hard to achieve, a photo of what your looking to achieve would help alot .

- CharlesNeil


I looked up “grey and Gray…....They have the same definition.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2409 days


#13 posted 07-04-2016 07:47 PM

Protect your lungs when sanding. Oxalic acid is nasty stuff.


What you have is an iron stain, oxcylic acid AKA deck brighter should kill it and get you back to raw wood, http://www.walmart.com/search/?query=wood%20bleach%20oxalic&typeahead=wood%20bleach

you will probably need to do a light sand with some 180 or 220 after it dries to remove some raised fiber, but its quick and easy, just give it a good hand sanding with the grain .

When your done bleaching wipe it down with a solution of 1 tablespoon of baking soda to 1 qt of water to neutralize the bleach .

- CharlesNeil


View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2440 posts in 1874 days


#14 posted 07-04-2016 08:43 PM

Purple is good!

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View splatman's profile

splatman

562 posts in 864 days


#15 posted 07-04-2016 10:55 PM

Just call it Purpleheart. :D

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