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Forum topic by rmeir posted 07-02-2016 02:06 PM 808 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rmeir

6 posts in 1740 days


07-02-2016 02:06 PM

hi i have been making bowls out of very hard maple,. I am using a makita 5/8 hammer drill and framag bits and what happens is that the bit begins spinning in the chuck and even at best, at a slow speed wont cut thru the wood. the bit is not brand new but i would call it reasonable sharp. I am thining the drill doesnt have the powewr to handle a big fostner. I have tried to read up on it and it seems like the makitas have a low torque and that creates the problem, a brand like dewalt has more torque and i might add a better chuck to hold onto the drill bit better. any suggestions as to strenght of drill etc.? also when i thighten the chuck i tighen all three of the little holes not just one


17 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#1 posted 07-02-2016 02:11 PM

Tighten all the holes won’t make a difference. Pretty sure the dewalt will have a 5/8 chuck as well. The dewalt has more torque but it won’t help if the bit will slip in its chuck too.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8261 posts in 2895 days


#2 posted 07-02-2016 02:21 PM

I’m betting your bit has a round shank. A hexagonal shank would likely solve your problem.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#3 posted 07-02-2016 02:39 PM



I m betting your bit has a round shank. A hexagonal shank would likely solve your problem.

- Gene Howe

Yep

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Slemi's profile

Slemi

103 posts in 1008 days


#4 posted 07-02-2016 02:43 PM


I m betting your bit has a round shank. A hexagonal shank would likely solve your problem.

- Gene Howe

Yep

- TheFridge


You can just file it on three sides. Just a little and it will solve your problem.

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runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1492 days


#5 posted 07-03-2016 12:06 AM

The strongest (with most torque) drills have triple reduction gearing, usually with a 1/2” or 5/8” chuck. The most powerful ones can actually hurt you if the bit should hang up. The old Milwaukee Hole Hawgs were known as wrist busters. Newer models have a clutch for low speed/high torque drilling. Dewalt comes to mind also, and I have an old B&D Timberwolf with the same features. This is from the old days, when B&D actually made industrial grade tools, not the cheap crap that company makes now.

I agree that grinding or filing 3 facets or the drill shank will prevent spinning. It is a bit challenging to get them spaced exactly right, and have them all ground evenly. Maybe somebody can weigh in on that?

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Rick M

7934 posts in 1847 days


#6 posted 07-03-2016 05:17 AM

That explains the drill bits I find that are ground on 3 sides and all of them wobble. Yeah, unless you are machinist, don’t even try it.

OP, it seems like you will be spending as much as a coring system would cost.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1187 days


#7 posted 07-03-2016 01:20 PM

The Milwaukee 2404-1 is a 1 1/4” drill, one of if not the most powerful hand drills you can buy. It doesn’t use a three jaw chuck, it uses a #3 morse taper as no one would be able to adequately tighten a three jaw chuck by hand. Adapters are available to allow the use of a three jaw chuck. What it sounds like you really need is a hex shank on the bit you’re trying to turn.

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woodbutcherbynight

2457 posts in 1876 days


#8 posted 07-04-2016 08:59 PM

A DRILL PRESS as well as shank end bits. This will allow you to control the feed rate better and raise up and clear the bit as it slowly goes through the wood. Think of it as good excuse to upgrade.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View BigTreeBC's profile

BigTreeBC

8 posts in 171 days


#9 posted 07-04-2016 09:06 PM

How big of a bit are you using?

Have you tried starting with a smaller pilot hole and working your way up? A smaller bit will meet less resistance and reduce the chance of it spinning in the jaws.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 691 days


#10 posted 07-04-2016 09:53 PM



How big of a bit are you using?

Have you tried starting with a smaller pilot hole and working your way up? A smaller bit will meet less resistance and reduce the chance of it spinning in the jaws.

- BigTreeBC

Wouldn’t that be dangerous with a Forstner? Without the center point able to set in before the cut, the bit could kickout pretty easy.

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3557 posts in 2028 days


#11 posted 07-04-2016 10:23 PM

Why don’t you use a Jacobs Chuck on the lathe tailstock and drill the hole?

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View BigTreeBC's profile

BigTreeBC

8 posts in 171 days


#12 posted 07-05-2016 05:12 PM

Good point, some how I missed the forstner bit part. I think I saw framag and thought framing thinking regular brad point.

I usually take forstner bits to the drill press though, especially for bigger holes, it saves your wrists a lot of punishment.

Drill power should be sufficient on any hand held though, the problem is that with hand helds its difficult to precisely control your feed speed to cut at a rate the drill can handle. Power just lets you do it faster.

Push to hard/to fast and something will have to give, as it’s the bit slipping in the chuck, there’s your problem, not the drill power.

How big of a bit are you using?

Have you tried starting with a smaller pilot hole and working your way up? A smaller bit will meet less resistance and reduce the chance of it spinning in the jaws.

- BigTreeBC

Wouldn t that be dangerous with a Forstner? Without the center point able to set in before the cut, the bit could kickout pretty easy.

- AZWoody


View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1471 posts in 2105 days


#13 posted 07-05-2016 08:58 PM

I have a Bosch corded drill with 1/2” chuck which I bought to mix mortar. I would chuck up the mortar mixing paddle which was about 24” long. If I didn’t hold the 5 gallon bucket firmly between my feet, it would spin the bucket with the mortar mixing paddle – half full of thinset. I can’t imagine it stalling with a forstner bit.

I think I paid $99 for it at one of the big box stores 15 years ago.

-Paul

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josephf

125 posts in 1563 days


#14 posted 07-06-2016 04:11 AM

had a chuck just fail on me . keeps loosening up now .maybe they just wear out . you might look for a used milwaukee hole hog .they have two speed transmission ,made for heavy loads . just seems like finding another heavy corded drill should be easy with all this cordless stuff on the market corded ones gather dust .

View Plain's profile

Plain

157 posts in 165 days


#15 posted 07-06-2016 04:44 AM

Take one of those rotary hammers with SDS+ chuck. I have Bosch and it drills into concrete maybe 50 times faster than a hammer drill. You also need a proper bit

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00VGECCAU/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1THAZDOWP300U

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