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How should I store/prep slivers

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Forum topic by Kristoffer posted 05-01-2010 04:59 AM 983 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kristoffer

675 posts in 2680 days


05-01-2010 04:59 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question trick maple milling rustic

A friend of mine gave me a few maple (what we call) “slivers” today. Basically, they are what you get when you take a trunk and cut (cross grain) 2 to 3 inch slabs. I’m hesitant to call them slabs because I’ve always known slabs to be long pieces that have been cut with the grain. They are basically like this one http://lumberjocks.com/projects/24784 , but about twenty-something inches wide and 2 to 3 inches thick. If you’d like pics, just say so and I’ll get ‘em posted a.s.a.p.

Anyway, I’m sure they’re going to split no matter what I do, but maybe I’m wrong or maybe there is something that I can do to minimize splitting. They’re still pretty green and I was wondering what I could do to speed up drying time or prevent/minimize splitting. Any tips will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Kristoffer

-- Cheers and God Bless


8 replies so far

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

452 posts in 2469 days


#1 posted 05-01-2010 05:38 AM

I think “rounds” is the term. The only slivers I get are with the grain.

I think you need to replace the moisture in the cells with “PEG” or polyethelene glycol to keep it from checking like crazy.

Google it.

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

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Kristoffer

675 posts in 2680 days


#2 posted 05-01-2010 05:59 AM

“Rounds”!!!!!!!!!!! Now that I think about it, that’s what I remember calling them in Texas. THANK YOU!!!! It was driving me nuts. But, for some reason, I still feel like I’d have to explain what I was talking about so everybody would know what I was talking about.

So, should I slowly replace the moisture with the polyblahblahblah, or do I just coat the rounds with it? Or….. Do I just look it up like a smart guy?

Thank you, Mike.

-- Cheers and God Bless

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patron

13537 posts in 2805 days


#3 posted 05-01-2010 06:10 AM

kristofer ,
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=1178&filter=anchor sea

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Kristoffer

675 posts in 2680 days


#4 posted 05-01-2010 06:13 AM

I must have taken a wrong turn somewhere, ‘cause….... Well, I googled polyethelene glycol and this is what I found…....

“USES: This medication is used to treat occasional constipation. It works by holding water in the stool to soften the stool and increases the number of bowel movements. It is known as an osmotic-type laxative.”

Did I use the wrong google)

-- Cheers and God Bless

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Kristoffer

675 posts in 2680 days


#5 posted 05-01-2010 06:36 AM

Thanks again, Michael and thanks David. I came across PEG on a Rockler site.

It says:
“Use to stabilize green wood to keep it from cracking, splitting and shrinking. Wood treated with Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is ready for carving , shaping or machining.”

Now, does this mean that…. If I coat it, it’s good to store it ‘til I can work with and it will be good as long as I seal it soon after I finish working it?

Still being new to woodworking, this is what gets me going. Any idiot can cut a miter, maybe even make a mortise and tenon joint, but if you don’t know these things…... Well, you’re just another schmuck like me. And that’s why I’m here, I’ve gotta become a higher grade of dunce:-) when it comes to our trade. Maybe I’ll be a woodworker someday.

-- Cheers and God Bless

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patron

13537 posts in 2805 days


#6 posted 05-01-2010 10:40 AM

you coat the end grain ,
and let it sit ,
( in the shade ) ,
until it is dry ,
then work it .

maybe years .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1440 posts in 2928 days


#7 posted 05-01-2010 12:46 PM

PEG is used for lots of things… like stool softeners. it does a lot of things depending on the size of the molecule.

anyway, my understanding was always that you really had to let that stuff soak in and penetrate. you’re not just trying to control checking on the end of a long board… your whole piece is “end”. but that should also make it penetrate easily. anyway, good luck :-)

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2798 days


#8 posted 05-01-2010 06:53 PM

I once cut a Sycamore in 5” thick “slivers”. The next day or maybe the day after that they were all cracked to pieces. I hope you don’t have the same experience Kristoffer.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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