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Cabinet saw alignment help / ?'s S.City,G.Int others w/miter slot seams

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Forum topic by athomas5009 posted 07-01-2016 10:10 PM 259 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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athomas5009

293 posts in 1079 days


07-01-2016 10:10 PM

Hi all I’m looking for a little assistance with aligning my cabinet saw properly. I have a Gen. Int. 50-240 GT, it is set up similar if not exactly like other brands that have the wing seams in the miter slot. I’ve had this saw for a year now and have never got it setup as accurately as I’d like. Close but there was always something I’d deal with.

Well I recently had to replace the bearings which was easy and eliminated some minor runout that was present. But at the same time having to removing the main slab threw off the factory aligned blade/miter slot alignment. Which is further complicated by only having partial miter slots to align the blade with.

From all my research these saws must have the blade miter slot aligned before the wings are added which prevent the use of a dial indicator. So I used a good combo sq that measured to 64”. I know I got close enough for many but I like my slots to be in the .002 range which usually requires gauges.

After blade alignment with an adj sq I leveled the wings within .001 then adjusted the miter slots to be consistent widths. This brings me to the point where I was imanging there would be a way to fine tune the blade/slot alignment with a dial indicator. But just my luck the only guidance given by both Steel City & Gen Int. is that this adjustment is unecessary and has been precision aligned at the factory. Talk about a kick in the d!ck, what if a repair is required that involves removing the entire top. I found this comical and searched the web for posts that might help but no dice so far.

So I’ve decided to stop here and pray for a solution from a fellow LJer. I could just attach the fence and deal with it but then I’ll I stain from fixing it until it’s totally necessary. Not to mention I’m just about through with wrenching and lifting these heavy a$$ slabs of granite lmao.

Please save me!!!!

Thanks
Andrew

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.


4 replies so far

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athomas5009

293 posts in 1079 days


#1 posted 07-01-2016 10:13 PM

Btw the directions that came with these saw are totally useless. I’ve heard of bad ones but these beat out some HF manuals.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

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bbasiaga

754 posts in 1456 days


#2 posted 07-01-2016 10:28 PM

Are the trunions mounted to the table, or to the cabinet? If they are mounted to the cabinet, then there are probably some set screws or mounts on the table you can loosen or tighten as appropriate to move the table. That’s how it is on my Saw Stop.

You measure the distance from the miter slot to one tooth on the blade. Check it with the tooth at the front of the saw, and then rotate the blade so the same tooth is at the back. If the distance is different more than about .002-.003”, you have to move the table. On my saw, there are two bolts I’d loosen one on the left side of the table, one on the right, and then two set screws. I’d back out one and push in the other to shift the table with respect to the blade. Repeat measuring until its where you want it.

If your saw has the trunion mounted to the table, the idea is the same, but you have to crawl underneath it and loosen the mount points underneath the table top. Adjust it and repeat your measurements.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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mrg

659 posts in 2461 days


#3 posted 07-02-2016 12:46 PM

Assuming everything is cut parallel, you could measure the edge of the throat plate opening to blade. Make sure blade is straight. Then check from miter edge to blade if aligned then your miter slots would be parallel at the same distance. Everything would be machined off the same reference point at the factory.

-- mrg

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athomas5009

293 posts in 1079 days


#4 posted 07-03-2016 03:02 PM

I finally got it back together and running last night. I just decided to put it back together and got lucky with the combo square alignment method. Once it was back together I checked it with the dial indicator .002 was close enough for me. These granite top saw can be finicky to align and set up. I can see how they never really caught on. I think the design might have worked better if it was 3/4” thicker and the slots were just milled into the slab.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

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