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Forum topic by Cliff posted 06-26-2016 10:46 PM 727 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cliff

896 posts in 1184 days


06-26-2016 10:46 PM

As a Novice Wood Worker I am always aware of the need to tread warily when attempting to operate a Power Tool I have not had experience with…..... THE ROUTER….....I have a healthy fear of the hand held Router, but feel more comfortable with a Table Mounted Router. No doubt with time and experience the hand held Router will not be as intimidating. I believe the fear is generated by the small Bit that hopefully wont come loose while spinning at high speed. This fear is also helped along by the high pitched scream from the Router that would wake the dead. ( I have ear muffs )

I have watched heaps of youtube and some are very good and clearly explain the correct presentation of stock being fed into the Router Bit and the orientation of the cutting as the bit makes contact with the wood. So I am slowly getting a handle on it. But for safety sake ” Steady as it goes”

With Wood Work I try to be as quite as possible out of consideration to my neighbours. Therefore a Cabinet for my KREG ROUTER TABLE seemed a good idea as hopefully it would muffle the screaming of the router. So to test it out I turned the Router on and walked around the entire yard listening. I even stood right on the dividing fence line on the side of the house where the Router is and to my great joy…...The Router Scream was well within the range of very reasonable lower noise level. So I am a Happy Chappy!!!!

I can see that as I progress along my Wood Working Hobby Pathway, the Router will be another very useful tool. If there are an Tips on general safety or operating skills that Fellow Lumber Jocks may suggest i would be very interested and most appreciative. Thank you.

Cliff

I have taken a few pictures you may wish to have a look at of my attempt at making a cabinet for my Kreg Router Table.

Kind regards and Happy Wood Working to all Lumber Jocks.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.


22 replies so far

View Druid's profile

Druid

1296 posts in 2255 days


#1 posted 06-26-2016 11:28 PM

For starters, I would say that your “Safe and Considerate” approach is excellent. When the time comes that you are looking at doing any free-hand routing, a solid work support with secure clamping for the workpiece will be essential, and I would suggest gathering a quantity of off-cuts to practice on. Definitely start your practice with smaller router bits, and shallower cuts so that you can gain the experience of how your router will react to the workload. If you have a variable speed router, pay attention to the recommended speed range that the manufacturer recommends for the particular bit. Keep in mind that several progressively deeper passes will give you a better finish, and a safer way to work, than one heavy pass.
If you have the opportunity to watch a friend, or visit a local cabinet making business, and see how they work, you should be able to pick up some first hand information and tips.
Best of luck, and I’ll be interested in seeing your projects.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#2 posted 06-26-2016 11:56 PM

Cliff, nice enclosure, curious if you’ll add another box around the router for under the table dust collection?

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#3 posted 06-26-2016 11:59 PM

Hi Cliff
you’re taking a good approach take your time and do things safely.Routers are one of the most versatile tools in the shop,I have a lot of them. Since I teach woodworking hear are some of the mistakes new woodworkers and even forgetful experienced woodworkers make,routing in the wrong direction of course in most cases you route from left to right on handheld routers and with router table right to left.Make sure you have a secure grip on routers when plugging them in just in case the switch is in the one position , Don’t install your router bits all the way to the bottom of your collect.Install the router bit push all the way down and pull it back up approximately and 1/8”. Make sure you have tightened your collet and height adjustment before routing,Don’t try hand routing with too large of router bits, when making deeper cuts use several passes to cut to full depth,when using a straight edge make sure it is securely clamped down,

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Bob Collins's profile

Bob Collins

2315 posts in 3144 days


#4 posted 06-27-2016 12:16 AM

Cliff, some great information from Jim and Druid on using routers. Have found that securely clamping the work piece when using a hand held router is essential. Just do some practice and I look forward to seeing your work.
Nice cabinet you made for the Keg.

-- Bob C, Australia. I love sharing as long as it is not my tools

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17118 posts in 2565 days


#5 posted 06-27-2016 02:18 AM

Hi Cliff. Nice cabinet. I could not see if it has a quick lift in it. I see Kreg has one exactly like woodpecker but they put no adjustment holes in it for leveling the table.

As for using the router by hand, Be sure to tighten the router bit real well and don’t leave it sticking out real far Put it in almost, but not quite, as far as it will go. Then clamp the piece down or use a rubber mat to hold it in place when you run the router around it. Don’t try to take all the depth at once…. go about a third of the way down, put the router down flat against the surface then move the router bit ( with a pilot bearing on it) into the work and keep it moving around the piece or it will burn the wood where it is sitting for any length of time. Use a scrap piece to test your cut before making the final depth of cut.

I don’t use huge bits by hand so what I do most of the time with the hand router is climb cut around the piece to prevent tear out. Using a forward cut, I have had oak tear out ahead of the cut and if it goes in too far on the early cuts and does not clean up with the final cut, I can screw up the piece.

I think what you should do is find a local woodworker who is at home with the hand router and spend some time with him/her to get comfortable with it. It is a great asset in the shop.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View doubleDD's profile (online now)

doubleDD

5213 posts in 1503 days


#6 posted 06-27-2016 02:57 AM

Great advise above Cliff. Smaller bites was a winner in my learning curve. In no time you will be buzzing around the whole board. Great job on the enclosure. You should hook up a vac or dust collector to suck up most of the dust.
Good luck.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Cliff 's profile

Cliff

896 posts in 1184 days


#7 posted 06-27-2016 04:11 AM

John. Great Advice. Thank you. I am really glad now that I posted this on the Forum, you have offered me exactly the right safety procedures to follow. The Router I have is a very old MAKITA, around 40 years old. My Brother bought it at a flood sale donkeys years ago and it was still in the box unopened when he gave it to me recently…..amazingly it roared into life without a hitch after being cooped up in its box all those years. It does not have variable speeds and just hangs from the router mount and manual adjustment is required. I am seriously considering buying a KREG ROUTER LIFT and buying another router that is compatible to the KREG….I will check with Big Brother first, but I am sure he wont be offended.

Regards,

Cliff.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.

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Cliff

896 posts in 1184 days


#8 posted 06-27-2016 04:23 AM

ChefHDAN. Thank you for commenting. Yes a good idea regarding another box for dust collection, I had thought of it but was not sure if I had the wood working ability to construct something like that…..but now having completed the present cabinet I feel confident to make alterations to it. Matter of fact I saw on youtube a woodworker who made a very nice cabinet just as you have described, so at a latter date may even rebuild a completely new cabinet.

Regards,

Cliff.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.

View Cliff 's profile

Cliff

896 posts in 1184 days


#9 posted 06-27-2016 04:40 AM

G’day Bob. How are you going? I agree, there is some great info from the L Js.

Good Tip from you Bob regarding securely clamping the work piece. I will remember that. I’m glad that you like the cabinet. I think I’ll stick with table routing for awhile until I get more used to it.

Regards,

Cliff.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.

View devann's profile

devann

2200 posts in 2152 days


#10 posted 06-27-2016 08:25 AM

+1 on the advice for multiple passes with some router bits for some applications. I’ve found this to be really important when using larger straight cut bits, when making deep grooves/ dados. I’ve tried being too aggressive with my depth setting and rate of speed making the cut. Found out that by the time I got to the end of my board I had exceeded my maximum desired finish depth of cut. Meaning the bit was literally being pulled out of the chuck as I proceeded further with the cut.

Another tip, NEVER alter the bearings that come with your router bit. I tried that once with a slot cutter. It came out of the chuck at a high rate of speed almost immediately after I started the cut. It hit me in the knee, hurt pretty good. I didn’t require a trip to the doctor but I did limp for a couple days. I was lucky. It was a hand held operation I was attempting. I had properly installed the bit in the chuck.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View Cliff 's profile

Cliff

896 posts in 1184 days


#11 posted 06-27-2016 09:09 AM

G’day Jim. Glad you like the cabinet. Funny how things work out…...only the other night I was watching a youtube of a woodworker who made a really nice cabinet for his KREG Table. My reaction was “Wow!!! I will just have to one day remodel my cabinet. The cabinet he made was able to be removed and had compartments inside,,,,never mind….that can be a project for another day.

Jim, thank you for the really sound advice. I will certainly be extremely careful when inserting the bit and the tightening in the chuck. I think I will wait until I become used to the fixed table routing before attempting to hand route. Perhaps two routers would be a good idea. One fixed permanently in the table and another router dedicated to hand routing?

Looking at the bits with a bearing there was an Allen Key Slot. I suppose it would be a good plan to make sure these are always tight. Good idea about finding someone who has experience, but I don’t think there is any one nearby who does wood work. I was considering doing a Router course, I think there is a few wood work Tutors in my town. Could be worthwhile looking into.
The Router I have doesn’t have a lift. I am thinking about getting a Router Lift and a Compatible router, it would make life a lot easier for changing bits and getting the correct height.

Thank you Jim.

Regards,

Cliff.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.

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Cliff

896 posts in 1184 days


#12 posted 06-27-2016 09:20 AM

a1Jim. Thank you very much for your professional advice. With your professional background in serious woodwork
and your role as a woodwork teacher, I am most fortunate to be able to benefit from your many years of experience. Thank you Jim, I assure you it is very much appreciated.

Kind regards,

Cliff.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.

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Cliff

896 posts in 1184 days


#13 posted 06-27-2016 09:32 AM

Dave, I agree with you. Great advice. Thank you for commenting on the cabinet. Yes the next step has to be a Vac/Dust Collector. I had a clean up in the shop today, long overdue,,,,,,what a mess it was, bits and pieces of wood and sawdust everywhere. I nearly needed a map to find my way around the Shop.

Regards,

Cliff.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3390 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 06-27-2016 09:34 AM

Hello Cliff
Nice work on enclosing the router table.
Dont forget to either positive pressurise with a fan or use your dust extractor to manage chips and provide air flow, as it will get hot inside as you work away.

-- Regards Robert

View Cliff 's profile

Cliff

896 posts in 1184 days


#15 posted 06-27-2016 09:37 AM

devann. Hi there. Thank you very much for your very sound advice. It certainly is appreciated.

Regards,

Cliff.

-- Cliff Australia : Snoring is good. It blows away all the Sawdust.

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

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