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Joining a post at an angle

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Forum topic by joshka89 posted 04-28-2010 01:20 PM 939 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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joshka89

2 posts in 2411 days


04-28-2010 01:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining

Hi there, new here but I have a question on a project I’m doing.

I’m creating a simple railing next to our front steps using preexisting posts. There are two square posts next to the front steps, one of which i have cut down shorter than the other. I want to lay a piece of wood across the top of these two to form a railing.

I’ve cut the posts to heights that will make the railing across the top lay over them at a 45 degree angle.

My question is, what is the best way to join the railing to these two posts at a 45 degree angle? Should I cut an angle on the posts and nail it down, or is there a more secure way of fastening this?

The railing will be used heavily, I’m placing it here because my grandmother has trouble with stairs and this will give her something to lean on to get up easier.

I’m also planning on attaching one end to the house for extra security. I bout some L-brackets but they don’t bend so I need a way of attaching the 45 degree post to the house as well.


5 replies so far

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miles125

2180 posts in 3465 days


#1 posted 04-28-2010 01:30 PM

Technically the railing angle should match the angle of the steps. Which can be derived by laying a straight edge from tread tip to tread tip and transfering that angle to the post. Usually more like 36 degrees. The top of the handrail should also be about 32” high when measured straight up from the front tip of a tread. Then cut the post at the angle and screw your rail down to it. Should be able to predrill a couple screws on angle to attach into house siding and sheathing. Hope this helps.

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

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patron

13535 posts in 2801 days


#2 posted 04-28-2010 01:33 PM

not totally sure what you mean ,
but railing to house ,
could have a ’ pad block ’ attached to the end of the railing ,
then to the house .

some pictures would help .

welcome to LJ’s .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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joshka89

2 posts in 2411 days


#3 posted 04-28-2010 01:34 PM

Yeah I have the posts and angle all measured out right, I just wasnt sure how to join the railing.

So just cut the post at that angle and lay the railing across the cuts and screw perpendicular into the rail and post?

The side of the house is concrete so I was going to use some concrete anchors for this. Also what would be the best way to screw the rail down to the house since there is an angle??

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patron

13535 posts in 2801 days


#4 posted 04-28-2010 01:50 PM

i always take my angles and measurements
by laying the parts on the stair treads and deck .
anything needed there ,
is the same as further up in the air .
the top post is usualy cut square ,
with it’s railing as part of the deck .
and the stair railing is slightly lower ,
and comes to it at an angle ,
and is angle cut to it ,
and screwed into the post .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 3247 days


#5 posted 04-29-2010 02:21 AM

I would put in a vertical stringer between the posts. (2×4 laid flat on the wall and toenailed or screwed into the posts. Top edge should be flush with the angled cuts on the posts). Screw through the stringer into the concrete with Tapcon screws, and then screw the rail down to the stringer and posts with wood screws.

Go

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

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