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Dozuki blade/handle compatibility--stupid question of the day #1

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Forum topic by Millo posted 04-28-2010 08:05 AM 1619 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Millo

543 posts in 2512 days


04-28-2010 08:05 AM

Hey all,

I was looking at Toolsforworkingwood.com and noticed they had a 25tpi rip dozuki blade, but were out of the handle. I assume it’s because they use the other Toshio Odate dozuki they sell. I purchased a dozuki which I guess I like, but it’s a crosscut saw. So I was wondering if anyone knew if there was much difference between this guy:
http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=MS-JS300.XX&Category_Code=TSJ

and the Takumi Dozuki Amazon.com sells:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00006FRP7/ref=s9_simh_gw_p60_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0C8Q5VQTQ2VC9R2HMX2V&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=470938631&pf_rd_i=507846

by they way, my Takumi does NOT have the handle in the picture, rather it has this one:
http://www.woodcraft.com/Catalog/ProductPage.aspx?prodid=9410&ss=96f08204-8a69-4683-a9a6-6bdf5117a073 ..but with the locking knob.

Any ideas on the subject? Of course, I can just buy another of the rip dozukis, or just break down and get a Veritas or Lie Nielsen, but I’m just starting out and there’s too much for me to learn and too many tools to buy.

If you happen to have an educated guess feel free to comment. I plan to call the toolsforworkingwood before the end of the week to bug them about it, LOL!

Thanks.


6 replies so far

View barryvabeach's profile

barryvabeach

159 posts in 2506 days


#1 posted 04-28-2010 02:38 PM

My 2 cents, which may be counterintuitive, it to buy a cheap or entry level ryoba first – once you have broken a few teeth off it you will be ready for the finer saws – At least that is what I did – it is very easy to break teeth on the finer ( thinner ) blades that japanese saws have – and once you have broken off a few ( actually I broke off more than a few) you start to learn that they really mean it when they say let the saw do all the work – don’t put downward pressure, and just hold the handle lightly and pull it back and forth and it will cut very quickly. call Joel at TWW and see what he suggests, he has an entry level ryoba that is pretty sturdy and will do a serviceable job.

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Millo

543 posts in 2512 days


#2 posted 04-28-2010 04:09 PM

Cool. I actually have used this Takumi dozuki I have for practicing dovetails—It’s ALL I have done as far as woodworking goes, LOL!! Pretty ridiculous, huh? I’ve only one a few, most of them worked but only one was actually truly successful—however, I did have to go back and fix it after the initial cutting. That’s what I’m trying to avoid. That was a bit more than a month ago. Since then I haven’t practiced any woodworking skills. I have that typical Crown gent’s saw that I would love to use (I have seen people use a sharpened and re-set one to create quick and absolutely perfect dovetails), but the set seems wrong (after talking to people about it, and seeing and using other Crowns with some of the set taken out and sharpened), and it is fairly dull; came like that, new.

Yeah, I thought about getting a ryoba first but after seeing how hard it was for me to saw level through the depth of a piece I thought, “hmm, maybe stick with backsaws for a while”. I do have that Marples cheap “detail pullsaw”. I might put a ryoba on the list for my next woodworking-related shopping spree.

Thanks.

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barryvabeach

159 posts in 2506 days


#3 posted 04-29-2010 02:53 AM

Milo, I hate to say it, but if you stick with one style of saw ( Japanese v. Western ) your learning curve will be much shorter. In general, you can get fairly good quality with a Japanese saw at a mid level price ( say 50 – 100 ) but the cost of an equivalent quality Western saw is much higher ( though it can be resharpened) If you want to stay with Japanese, which I prefer only because I have been using them so long, go with a very delicate touch and buy http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=MS-JS340&Category_Code=TSJ which as the page notes was rated the best dovetailing saw by FWW . I have one and it works great. The other alternative is this one you posted http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=MS-JS300.XX&Category_Code=TSJ for only 20 it is a steal – though I like the feel of the bigger saw.

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Millo

543 posts in 2512 days


#4 posted 04-29-2010 05:41 AM

barry,

That is one great observation—the one about sticking w/ only one kind of saw when starting out. That one I posted from toolsforworkingwood is only the blade—I was just wondering if that blade could work with my Takumi dozuki handle, which is the one that appears in the Woodcraft pic, but with the locking knob (I think they cut it out in the Woodcraft pic).

It’s good to know about the $100 rip dozuki b/c that is high on my wish list for EVENTUAL nice gear to get.

Thanks for your tips, much appreciated!

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barryvabeach

159 posts in 2506 days


#5 posted 04-29-2010 01:32 PM

Milo, if the locking knob is in the same place, and both blades are the same thickness, it should work. I took a blade that was meant for one saw and put it in another handle and it worked fine. The blade usually has a notch in it and the locking knob just fits in that notch so that the blade can’t come out. Even if it doesn’t have a notch in the right place, you should be able to hold the new blade up against the old one and see how you need to modify the new one so it locks in place. If the new blade is thicker of course, it probably won’t fit in the handle, though you can always make a non locking handle yourself – it is just 2 pieces of wood with a very thin dado ( not as deep as the blade) so that as you clamp and glue the 2 pieces together, the blade is trapped.

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Millo

543 posts in 2512 days


#6 posted 04-29-2010 02:30 PM

Hey Barry,

On my particular dozuki the blade handle groove is about 1/8” thick, 25/32” long

On the blade itself: from the corner where the edge of the blade ends and the beginning of the shaft starts to the notch for that locking knob is it’s about 27/32”, or ~21.5mm…

I’ll give them a call tomorrow morning at the latest, see if they can give me an educated guess, since I’m pretty sure they’re not going to measure that just for me. I might have to wait until next week to place an order (monthly-budget reasons), anyway.

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