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How much angle if any do you like to put on your mallet?

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Forum topic by spaids posted 1535 days ago 998 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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spaids

699 posts in 2277 days


1535 days ago

I just made my first. No angle at all.
Click for details

Now look that this killer mallet.
Click for details

That guys mallet it pretty sweet. Lots of angle on there too.

How do you all prefer yours? I think I might put a little bit on mine. It should let me hold my wrist a little bit lower right? Is that the only reason?

Later
Spaids

-- Wipe the blood stains from your blade before coming in.--


14 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8475 posts in 2233 days


#1 posted 1535 days ago

I need to make one for myself as well, and based on my design it’ll be 2-5 degrees angle.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1577 posts in 1875 days


#2 posted 1535 days ago

Click for details

The big one has 3 degrees on each end; the others have none. The middle one could perhaps use some angle, or could use the head shortened a bit on each end. The little one is fine the way it is. It was just a matter of “feel”, and of hitting something like you might use it in service, and observing how squarely the face was landing. Honestly, I had (still have) no clue about mallet ergonomics; this was seat of the pants engineering.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2312 days


#3 posted 1535 days ago

one thing that I’ve wondered is why not do both? A mallet has two sides after all (more than that really, but who’s counting?)

View FJPetruso's profile

FJPetruso

291 posts in 2294 days


#4 posted 1535 days ago

I checked my ole store bought mallets. The larger one that I bought from Rockler has about 4 degree angle faces. When I use it I feel as though I’m turning my wrist a bit forward to keep from hitting off of the lower edge of the face. The smaller one that I bought at Harbor Freight has 5 degree faces. The smaller HF model has a better feel but it’s too light for some jobs. The smaller, lighter one has a shorter handle too. So that may make a difference. When I make my own I’m going to start with about a 7 or 8 degree angle & a straight stick handle for testing. With the tapered, removable style handle I’ll be able to trim the angle down a little at a time until I get the right feel. I may even try knocking the handle out of the Rockler mallet & increase the angle a degree or two at a time & see how it feels first.

-- Frank, Florissant, Missouri "The New Show-Me Woodshop"

View John Gray's profile

John Gray

2367 posts in 2470 days


#5 posted 1535 days ago

I just checked my English made one it’s 2 1/2 degrees on one side and 3 degrees on the other.

-- Only the Shadow knows....................

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1556 days


#6 posted 1535 days ago

I made note of something I saw one time…many years ago in print related to timberframing. It went something like this. (It will require an assistant) Make the mallet but don’t angle the face yet. Then take a string that is more than twice the length of your forearm plus twice the length of the mallet (it is no problem if it is too long, but no good if too short). Hold the mallet in your hand, like you would normally hold it. Put your elbow on the mid point in the string, then have your assistant ron both ends of the string up to mallet’s head on opposite sides of the handle. The string will mark the lines on the mallet head to give you the angle that matches your arm for your mallet. Mark the lines and cut to them.

Sorry I just realized this description is hard to follow…. I’ll work on getting a photo the method … it is easier to see it than read about it.

This method really only works if you are swinging your mallet from your elbow as the pivot point. If you are swinging it from your wrist (for small work) you have to string it from the pivot point of your wrist instead of your elbow.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14549 posts in 2260 days


#7 posted 1535 days ago

Make sense to me. Can’t be too hard :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View jeremyslat's profile

jeremyslat

21 posts in 1535 days


#8 posted 1535 days ago

Thats a great looking mallet.Keep up the good work!!!!

-- Jeremy, Gary,Indiana

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2161 days


#9 posted 1535 days ago

I don’t see the point behind and angle but it looks great.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Blake's profile

Blake

3434 posts in 2458 days


#10 posted 1535 days ago

I based the angle for my mallet on an article I read in fine woodworking once. It should be able to sit on its face and the end of the handle should just touch the table at the same time. Somehow that translates to the correct anatomical angle.

Click for details

-- Happy woodworking! http://www.openarmsphotography.com

View spaids's profile

spaids

699 posts in 2277 days


#11 posted 1535 days ago

Geees who knew a mallet could have so much thought behind the design.

-- Wipe the blood stains from your blade before coming in.--

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1556 days


#12 posted 1534 days ago

Blake wrote: I based the angle for my mallet on an article I read in fine woodworking once. It should be able to sit on its face and the end of the handle should just touch the table at the same time. Somehow that translates to the correct anatomical angle.

That would make sense for any mallet swung pivoting at the wrist rather than the elbow. It makes the assumption that the person using the mallet holds it near the end of the handle. Which would be true for a light duty bench mallet, but would be too angled for a mallet used for larger jobs like chopping mortises on a timber frame where you are swinging from the elbow.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1556 days


#13 posted 1534 days ago

Here’s an image that may help straighten out my words.

The red lines indicate the angle for a light use mallet (one swung from the wrist) while the blue lines indicate the angle for a heavy use mallet (one swung from the elbow)

Mallet Angle based on use.

In essence, the smaller the radius of the swing, the more angled the mallet face.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 2371 days


#14 posted 1534 days ago

I always angle mine where the face is flat to the table with my hand gripped on the handle and my knuckles not quite touching the table. This allows me to grab it where comfortable to me depending on the head weight, and allow me to strike a flat blow without smashing my knuckles. This also means that the angle changes slightly as I mill off the face surface as it gets damaged.

Different angle for each mallet depending on head size/weight and where I want to normally grab the handle.

When making one for someone else, the first step is to get the cross-sectional size and shape of the handle comfortable for the user. After making the handle, it is mated to a head blank, and then the face angle is adjusted depending on where the user wants to grip it for a good balance feel depending on head weight. (I have only made one other for someone else, but they really enjoyed using it)

JMTCW

Go

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

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