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What's your favorite paste wax, and why?

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Forum topic by Jonathan posted 04-27-2010 05:11 PM 7185 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jonathan

2605 posts in 1716 days


04-27-2010 05:11 PM

I’m sure there will be plenty of debate on this topic, but I am curious as to everyone’s thoughts on this?

You very well may have more than one favorite, but maybe for different applications, so please list multiple products for the various applications.

Thanks for your input everybody!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."


28 replies so far

View David "Lucky Dawg" Brown's profile

David "Lucky Dawg" Brown

440 posts in 1658 days


#1 posted 04-27-2010 05:15 PM

Same here I’m to the paste wax world so I would also enjoy knowing more
about it before I go and purchase the wrong kind and am stuck with it!

Were waiting LJ’s!

-- dumpster diver delux

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3809 posts in 2328 days


#2 posted 04-27-2010 05:34 PM

For tools (e.g. table saw top, scroll saw, jointer tables, etc.), I use ordinary Johnson’s Paste Wax (in the big yellow can).

For projects, I use Renaissance Micro-Crystalline Wax Polish … pricey, but produces a great finished piece.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View cstrang's profile

cstrang

1769 posts in 1834 days


#3 posted 04-27-2010 05:37 PM

For my cast iron tops it’s Johnson’s Paste wax and for my projects I use Minwax.

-- A hammer dangling from a wall will bang and sound like work when the wind blows the right way.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1716 days


#4 posted 04-27-2010 05:49 PM

TheDane,

Do you prefer the Renaissance wax on all your projects, or just turned items? I looked at a container at Rockler when it was on sale a few weeks ago, and thought it’d be excellent for smaller turned items, etc. but wasn’t sure about something I’m wiping on and wiping off by hand. I thought I might go through it fairly quickly, for a picture frame, or something similar. I have read a ton of great comments on it though and would eventually like to try it on something.

I too use the Johnson’s on the tablesaw, and will be using it once I get the bandsaw assembled.

I have used it on a couple of projects, but can’t stand the smell. Once it’s dry, it’s fine. It’s the only wax I have right now (came with the tablesaw), but I’m considering others right now, which is why posed this question.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3164 posts in 2488 days


#5 posted 04-27-2010 07:30 PM

Myland Wax from the UK with the queen seal of approval. It goes on like butter and buff out to a very nice satin hand rub looking finish. I like to use it over Watco’s Danish oil for a super rich finish. To price to apply on cast tops and other tools, strictly for finish work. A very nice hand rub look with great durability its been my choice for plenty of years now thanks for asking and good luck finding your go to wax.

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2793 days


#6 posted 04-27-2010 09:29 PM

Homebrew…

-- 温故知新

View Timberwerks's profile

Timberwerks

304 posts in 1826 days


#7 posted 04-27-2010 10:35 PM

I use Liberon Black Bison. It’s easy to apply, drys hard and has a nice scent. It is also easy to remove if needed. Renaissance is also a good wax but it is very difficult to remove completely if you need to re-finish.

-- http://djofurnituremaker.wordpress.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3809 posts in 2328 days


#8 posted 04-27-2010 10:35 PM

Jonathan—I’m not a turner (don’t have a lathe). I use renaissance on small projects like pencil holders, picture frames, etc.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1716 days


#9 posted 04-27-2010 11:33 PM

TheDane,
I mistakenly presumed that you turned, as it seems like most people I’ve read about that use Renaissance use it on turned projects. How long would you say a small container of it tends to last you then? I’m sure this can vary greatly, based on the size of the project, but a rough estimate would still be helpful.

Timberwerks,
I almost picked-up a container of Liberon Black Bison last time I was at Rockler, but didn’t. Maybe next time. Thanks for your impression on that particular wax. What’s your preferred method of removal for it?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1716 days


#10 posted 04-28-2010 12:37 AM

I have wondered about the Neutral vs. Clear in the Black Bison line of wax? Not having used them yet, the only difference I can tell (on paper) is that the Clear is supposed to have a bit of an amber tint to it compared to the Neutral, which is supposed to be neutral (go figure).

Does anybody prefer one over the other between these two specific products?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Timberwerks's profile

Timberwerks

304 posts in 1826 days


#11 posted 04-28-2010 02:16 AM

I use the neutral Black Bison. To remove the wax I use a cotton cloth and I then buff out with Liberon 0000 steel wool. It always leaves a flawless silky smooth finish with no dull wax residue. I typically use two coats.

-- http://djofurnituremaker.wordpress.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

View D1st's profile

D1st

289 posts in 1705 days


#12 posted 04-28-2010 07:28 AM

I recently put Howards citrus paste wax on a piece and it turned out nice. The main reason I bought this wax was for my table saw. The cast iron got rusty after a storm and my roof had a leak right over the saw. I got the rust off and put Howards on it and buffed it out. It looks real good.

-- http://www.furstwoodworks.com/

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2192 days


#13 posted 04-28-2010 08:35 AM

Another vote for Johnson’s but I also use car waxes that are hard finishes and some with buffing compound in them to smooth out my dust problems. Almost all come out 99% smooth, silky and protected.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 2000 days


#14 posted 04-28-2010 12:57 PM

I like the Mylands. If I remember correctly it is a blend of beeswax and Carnuba. A good combination of soft and hard. I wouldn’t recommend waxes for stuff that will be handled a lot or will be exposed to moisture, as with a fruit bowl, for example.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1716 days


#15 posted 04-28-2010 03:25 PM

Again, I’m learning here, so I will ask the question Mike:

I thought one of the reasons to use the wax (besides the silky-smooth sheen) was to help repel water? I think I’m going to remove the wax from the herb tray, by the way, and put on a few coats of poly. Then maybe some wax over that once it cures.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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