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Grizzly G0623x sliding table saw vs. traditional cabinet saw

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Forum topic by noone posted 06-22-2016 06:11 PM 1760 views 0 times favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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noone

559 posts in 1732 days


06-22-2016 06:11 PM

I was initially debating my new table saw purchase of a SawStop vs. a Delta Unisaw or Powermatic PM2000 but have now widened my options by including a Grizzly G0623x slider in the mix. I like the inherent safety appeal and perceived ease of use the slider offers. My max budget is 5K no matter which table saw I choose. I don’t believe I can afford a 1 phase powered 8ft+ slider. Don’t see any used either.

I’m interested in your opinions on a 5 foot throw slider vs. a traditional cabinet saw. I am a hobbyist beautifying our home with a great deal of built-in cabinetry. I eventually, once the home is complete, move into furniture building as well.

I like the idea of the slider I am just wondering what I can do to rip 8 ft panels if I need full 8 foot length sides for a tall built in if this is my only saw. Ideas?

Let’s discuss advantages and disadvantages of a 5ft sliding table saw vs. a traditional cabinet saw.


39 replies so far

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Loren

8293 posts in 3107 days


#1 posted 06-22-2016 06:32 PM

Get a Eurekazone 9’ saw track for the special rips.

There’s been a lot of criticism of Grizzly sliders. Proceed
with caution. Sliders are complicated machines.

Totally recommended though.

Try looking for a used slider from a shop which has
gone to CNC or upgraded for business reasons or to
get more computerized.

For 5k you can find an older Altendorf or Martin – the
best ones. Lots of brands hold up if well-maintained
though. Paolini is good too, and cheaper.

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Loren

8293 posts in 3107 days


#2 posted 06-22-2016 06:37 PM

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noone

559 posts in 1732 days


#3 posted 06-22-2016 07:14 PM

How can I affordably get 3 phase power working in a residential home?

That seems to be the rub here. I believe 3 phase power conversion for 5hp plus motors is around 2k in cost?

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Loren

8293 posts in 3107 days


#4 posted 06-22-2016 07:25 PM

No. You need a 10hp motor (about $200 used on ebay)
and a 10hp phase converter kit from the guy on ebay.
About $200 for that.

With that you can start and run a 5hp table saw
no problem. I think I have mine on a 50 amp 220v
breaker in my shop sub-panel. I did the work myself
and it took about 1/2 a day to set it up.

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noone

559 posts in 1732 days


#5 posted 06-22-2016 07:29 PM

I already have the 50amp 240v circuit. Would be interested in some links to these eBay listings if available. Can you PM me please?

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Loren

8293 posts in 3107 days


#6 posted 06-22-2016 07:44 PM

done.

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muleskinner

880 posts in 1896 days


#7 posted 06-22-2016 08:11 PM

This just popped up on my local Craigs list last night. 16” Griggio slider that needs a motor for $1100. Don’t know anything about the brand (or sliders for that matter) but it looks like it’s built for stout and in fairly decent shape. That and Loren’s $500 power package and a guy would have most of his 5k saw budget left for other things. And of course there’s always the possibility it’s a piece of crap. Research and advice from wiser hands would be in order.

http://olympic.craigslist.org/tls/5645685055.html

-- Visualize whirled peas

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MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#8 posted 06-22-2016 08:16 PM

How can I affordably get 3 phase power working in a residential home?
- noone

For up to 5hp (~10.5A FLA motor), about $200 for a V/Hz (scalar) VFD, or just a hair more for a sensorless vector VFD which gives you a few more benefits/features. You can find cheaper imported ones on the Bay as well, although support will be mostly non-existent on those. Above 5hp and your options get a bit more limited – RPC or static phase converter, neither of witch gives you any of extra benefits you get with a VFD.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Redoak49

1933 posts in 1448 days


#9 posted 06-22-2016 08:18 PM

You should also consider the space requirement. The sliders are nice but before you consider very far you should find one to try out.

I looked at your posts and projects and trying to understand what type of woodworking you do or plan to do. Also, what other tools you have and space available. These things would make it much easier to comment on saws you might use best.

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Loren

8293 posts in 3107 days


#10 posted 06-22-2016 08:29 PM

I have two sliders – not enough room to have them
both set up. I was intending to sell the Felder when
I got the Tannewitz. Not because I don’t like it
but because I was able to tolerate the Tannewitz
(1930s, 1800lbs) and it has a smaller footprint.

Needs and space available vary. Pro shops often
skip using a jointer and instead joint 8’ boards on
a slider, which sounds great, but for a modest
volume of work it’s okay to do it in more ordinary
ways.

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noone

559 posts in 1732 days


#11 posted 06-22-2016 08:59 PM


You should also consider the space requirement. The sliders are nice but before you consider very far you should find one to try out.

I looked at your posts and projects and trying to understand what type of woodworking you do or plan to do. Also, what other tools you have and space available. These things would make it much easier to comment on saws you might use best.

- Redoak49

I primarily have been making built-ins for my home using primarily sheet goods and solid stock for the edges and stock moldings. I sometimes create my own moldings for trim, but rarely. I am just a hobbyist and love woodworking but only get a day on a weekend to play or nights after my 2 year old goes to bed, but usually I am too beat to do anything at night from my office day job which drains my brain.

I have been looking at upgrading because I love the hobby and buying a cabinet saw but am trying to see if I can better utilize my 5 grand table saw budget. I am getting by just fine with my Ridgid R4512 table saw and straight line 8 ft. jig i just made. I buy my wood from a lumber yard S3S and plane it down to 3/4” with a Dewalt DW735 and then straight line rip it on my Ridgid table saw with said jig. I do need 8 ft long pieces of 1×2 frequently for side trim. I guess I could keep my Ridgid table saw around, but was hoping to be able to get rid of it by getting a slider.

My projects move at an extremely slow pace when including finishing in the process.

Should I just stick with a Unisaw or Powermatic cabinet saw? I like the SawStop ICS, but I don’t care for the PCS. The SawStop ICS is almost 5K by itself. The Unisaw and Powermatic are 3K.

Thoughts?

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AZWoody

693 posts in 683 days


#12 posted 06-22-2016 09:49 PM

I’ll get you the measurements of mine so you can get an idea on the footprint later after it’s cooled down a bit.
I would love an Altendorf full sized but my space is limited.

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Arlin Eastman

3547 posts in 2020 days


#13 posted 06-22-2016 10:17 PM

All the Europeans use Slider table saws and wonder why we don’t. To me they are a lot safer then the ones we use since the hands never have to get close to the blade.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

8293 posts in 3107 days


#14 posted 06-22-2016 10:19 PM

You’ll love a format slider. It’s real fun to work with the
crosscutting stops. With the fence retracted you have a
stop to the right for small part cut-offs and one to the
left for x-cutting. It’s so fast and precise you won’t
want to give it up.

In terms of ripping it’s the same experience as a
regular table saw. Mitering panel corners is a snap,
as is crosscutting cabinet sides. It’s not the end-all
of panel processing, but it’s close. A nice Eurekazone
setup will get you close in terms of speed and
repeatability. A cabinet saw won’t.

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noone

559 posts in 1732 days


#15 posted 06-22-2016 10:59 PM



You ll love a format slider. It s real fun to work with the
crosscutting stops. With the fence retracted you have a
stop to the right for small part cut-offs and one to the
left for x-cutting. It s so fast and precise you won t
want to give it up.

In terms of ripping it s the same experience as a
regular table saw. Mitering panel corners is a snap,
as is crosscutting cabinet sides. It s not the end-all
of panel processing, but it s close. A nice Eurekazone
setup will get you close in terms of speed and
repeatability. A cabinet saw won t.

- Loren

If you have a 2” wide 8’ board you are trying to rip down to 1.5” wide, how do you do that on a 5ft slider?

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