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Kitchen hardwood floor needs refinishing (maple)

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Forum topic by AAANDRRREW posted 06-21-2016 05:32 PM 428 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AAANDRRREW

115 posts in 635 days


06-21-2016 05:32 PM

I got some maple hardwood flooring that is in need of some love. The previous owner had allowed the poly and in some spots the stain to wear away. The high traffic areas are down to bare wood in some spots. All in all, I’m looking at two rooms, roughly both 12×12. I’m thinking sand the whole thing down, restain, then poly (or something similar).

My question is, will I be at this a LONG time with only my 5” RO sander? Also, can one just use regular interior stain and regular poly (I’d prefer to dilute and wipe on versus using a roller/squeegee) to do this? Or, should I just hire someone and call it good?


11 replies so far

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tealetm

58 posts in 320 days


#1 posted 06-21-2016 06:22 PM

I just put new hard maple floors (sugar maple I believe) at my place. I had somebody come in a do the sanding and finishing- if you’re going to do it with a 5” sander you’ll be there for ever and it won’t be uniform. Rent a floor sander from your local hardware store, I’d recommend not using a drum type if you’re not familiar with them.

I wouldn’t recommend trying to stain a maple floor- unless you like a blotchy look. Some people dampen the bare wood to raise the grain before applying the finish- I’m not sure if you should try that on something that’s previously been finished.

3 coats of poly is recommended, I did 4 in the kitchen.

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tealetm

58 posts in 320 days


#2 posted 06-21-2016 06:23 PM

My mistake- I misread and didn’t realize your flooring was loose so disregard the comment about the floor sander.

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JBrow

818 posts in 382 days


#3 posted 06-21-2016 11:43 PM

AAANDRRREW,

I consider myself a big time do-it-yourselfer. In part to save money, but also because when hiring someone, you often just do not know how good the contractor will do the job. However there are a few things I hire out. For me this would be one of those hire-it-out jobs.

A random orbital sander would make for a long, dusty, and tedious job, especially when faced with 300 square feet. Renting floor sanding equipment could allow you to remove the dirt and grim and get back to bare wood in short order, but it would also be easy for me to also ruin the floors and leave the house full of dust. Then getting the finish just right could also be a little tricky.

The problem with hiring someone is finding a contractor who knows what he is doing, is reliable, and otherwise a real pro. I suppose if they have been in the business a long time, own all the equipment needed for the job, can describe to you all the steps that are required and how they will approach each step, and their references all agree that the contractor shows up on time, performs the work in a professional workmanlike manner, and the references are all satisfied with the work, then that would be the contractor I would select. A real pro will not be cheap, but should leave you very satisfied.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#4 posted 06-22-2016 12:05 AM

Its not just the sanding, its also the finishing. Its a small area and tempting to DIY, but I would hire it out & be done with it. You may need to move out for a few days if they use oil based urethane (which I think is best) but it will be worth it.

Finding a reputable contractor shouldn’t be too hard. Look for one who’s been in business a few years.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Rick M

7910 posts in 1843 days


#5 posted 06-22-2016 12:48 AM

My wife sanded and refinished our floors while I was out of town. She rented the sander. Only mistake was she didn’t use enough coats of finish in the dining room.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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oldnovice

5723 posts in 2830 days


#6 posted 06-22-2016 03:46 AM

I refinished our bedroom floor in Illinois with a 1/2 sheet orbital sander.
I wore a dust mask, set a box fan in the window to suck the airborne dust, closed all doors, knee pads, and skateboard wrist guards on my wrists.

I did that because the rental big floor sander was not available, it was a very small town, and would probably not be for another month. The pro floor finishers wanted w a y too much money just to sand the floor.

The flooor turned out beautiful after 3 coats of the Carver-Tripp water based finish with the extra hardner added. That finish was extraordinary and it was a shame they are no longer around.

Would I do it today, no, as that was over 30 years ago and while the sander still works the same I don’t!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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TraylorPark

151 posts in 1061 days


#7 posted 06-22-2016 12:55 PM

I did about 500sf of flooring in my house 5 years ago. Rented a random orbital floor sander and took it down to 150 I believe. I used normal minwax stain thinned a bit and just rubbed it on, but it took about a week to dry (my daughter got real tired of sleeping on the floor since her room was one being done) then I did three coats of water based floor poly over three days with a light sanding inbetween coats. Not an easy or quick DIY, but very doable. I would say the floor has held up very well considering we have two dogs and two small children trying their hardest to destroy it.

-- --Zach

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jdh122

879 posts in 2280 days


#8 posted 06-22-2016 01:53 PM

I’ve done it 4-5 times with rented tools (drum and edge sanders) in my own houses and for friends. Very doable, if extremely messy and downright exhausting, especially the edge sanding. It’s not a “fun” project but you can save a good amount of money and get a good result.
I’ve never stained the wood, however (always just polyurethane or wb varnish) and personally I’d be way more worried about that than about the sanding. Since you’re unlikely to be able to sand all the way through the stain you will probably have to re-stain.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

115 posts in 635 days


#9 posted 06-22-2016 02:05 PM

So, I don’t actually have possession of the home yet – That will come in a month or two after closing. But, here is a picture of the flooring from the real estate website – It’s billed as maple…but looking from the grain, I’m not sure it is… What do you guys think?

Also- the listing agent conveniently didn’t take a photo of the floor where its in rough shape :)

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jdh122

879 posts in 2280 days


#10 posted 06-22-2016 02:12 PM

Hard to say from the photo, but it could be maple. Could also be birch or a mix of birch and maple (the mix is what is most common where I live).
Doesn’t look stained to me, just the regular yellowing of polyurethane.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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Rick M

7910 posts in 1843 days


#11 posted 06-22-2016 06:24 PM

The good news is that you haven’t moved in. Refinishing floors where you are living is a PITA. Yeah if it’s empty then go to town and do them all and put on a bunch of coats of finish then not worry about it for a very long time.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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