LumberJocks

What wood for this project

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by MrRon posted 06-20-2016 03:57 PM 396 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


06-20-2016 03:57 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I am building a train model (3/4” scale) and need to make these window frames. I made a sample one from pine, but it was not strong enough. It chipped out at the point indicate on thge sketch. What would be a good hardwood to use to prevent the chipout? Lignum Vitae aka ironwood would probably work, but would be difficult to find. I’m thinking more along the line of cherry, oak or poplar.


7 replies so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

829 posts in 688 days


#1 posted 06-20-2016 04:24 PM

What are you using to cut the wood (router or other rotating cutter?)

Basically I’d assume any wood preferred for carving would work well (bass wood comes to mind). Given the small size, I’d think some kind of plastic would be more suitable but with wood, the less grainy, the better.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#2 posted 06-20-2016 04:38 PM

I’d try maple or poplar.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


#3 posted 06-20-2016 05:09 PM

I have to make (4) of these. I cut the pine one on the table saw (very carefully) guiding it along the fence. I thought about using a router, but I think because of the small size, would be hard to control. I first bored the holes with a 1” forstener bit in a larger piece; then trimmed the outside perimeter on a sander. Making them doesn’t seem to be much of a problem; just the right wood to use. Poplar is readily available, so I will try using that. I also have some cherry and ash I can experiment with. Thanks for all your help.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

829 posts in 688 days


#4 posted 06-20-2016 06:53 PM

With a choice between Cherry, Ash, and Poplar, Poplar would be best. Usually hardwoods are prone to chipping compared to softwoods. Poplar is a ‘soft’ hardwood.

This is an interesting project. As the portal bolt holes real holes?

Just thinking mind you, but if I had to make these, based on my experience I would begin with a 2-1/2” x 1-1/2” piece of easy-to-work wood, basically a stick. The idea is to make the parts on the stick and cut them off like cutting a pepperoni. To begin, I would use a 3/4” radius round over bit along the length of the stick to form the outer profile. Then route a 2” long mortice in the end, as deep as practical (maybe 1”) with a 1” diameter bit A carrier could be easily made to hold the stick on-end during this operation (or use a drill press with the stick on-end).. This creates the inside hole.
The rabbeted lip could also be done on the router table using the fence to expose enough of a small straight cut bit (the depth of the lip). The bit height would be set to 3/16” and with a miter gauge to keep the stick perpendicular to the fence with its end against the fence, roll the stick over the bit and create the lip.

Proceed to the bandsaw (with a good zero clearance insert) and cut off the window frame to the proper thickness. Go back to the router table and roll out another lip, to the bandsaw, rinse, repeat.

You only need four so doing the router table setup may be more work versus a sander.
Anyway, just thinking out loud!

Good luck!

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


#5 posted 06-20-2016 07:18 PM



With a choice between Cherry, Ash, and Poplar, Poplar would be best. Usually hardwoods are prone to chipping compared to softwoods. Poplar is a soft hardwood.

This is an interesting project. As the portal bolt holes real holes?


Thank you for your input. Sounds like good advise. The way I was intending on doing it was to first get the wood down to 3/16” thickness; then clamp all pieces together and bore the (2) 1” dia holes with a forstner bit. I would then form the perimeter by cutting/sanding to final dimensions. Then using the circular saw, fence and zero insert, cut the final profile. I’m using a 7-1/2” blade on my cabinet saw instead of the 10” blade…......Yes I will drill the holes shown on the sketch to attach it to the body with hex head nail heads. This is a scale model down to the nuts and bolts used. FYI, hex heads on small nails are easy to make. Just take a piece of wood with hexagon profile; drill a hole in the end for a nail and hold it against a grinding wheel. A jig is employed to guide the hexagon holder. I have been building scale models for over 60 years in scales ranging from N gauge to 1-1/2” scale, so I guess I’m getting better as I go.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


#6 posted 06-26-2016 07:36 PM

I tried using cherry (because I had it). I tried making it on the router table, but as I expected, it was too small to be manageable. The bit caught the piece and destroyed it. I then made another one using the table saw wit a 7-1/2” blade and that came out good with no chipping. A light touch-up with sandpaper and it was done. These small items are dangerous to make on a table saw as your fingers have to be very close to the blade, but the blade only sticks up 1/8” above the top and the wood covers it. A ZCI is an absolute must. I just have to count my fingers when I’m finished.

Making small parts with power tools presents challenges as your fingers have to get close and sometimes too close to a spinning blade for comfort. I try to utilize custom made jigs to guide the work, keeping my fingers as far from the blade as possible.

View splatman's profile

splatman

563 posts in 865 days


#7 posted 06-26-2016 08:43 PM

Probably the best material (other than non-wood types), is craft/hobby plywood, sold in hobby stores in small sizes. That would probably eliminate the chipout issue.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com