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Forum topic by daddywoofdawg posted 06-15-2016 12:09 PM 719 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1034 days


06-15-2016 12:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have a production run, and each piece needs 12 1” holes.My question,Is there a advantage or best to use between hole saw,Forstner bit,spade bit?( I have them all), I will be drilling though 1/2” or 3/4” Baltic birch ply.


15 replies so far

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

346 posts in 1606 days


#1 posted 06-15-2016 12:17 PM

Are you looking for efficiency or speed? If you get to basics, the hole saw would be the most efficient since it will only be cutting the outside diameter. Spade bits can make a real mess of plywood so I would be hesitant to use that one. Forstner bits will give you the best end result; smooth hole edges.

So I guess it depends on what the results need to look like. A 1” hole isn’t that big so I would flip a coin between the hole saw and forstner bit.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

140 posts in 200 days


#2 posted 06-15-2016 01:13 PM

I’ll second what Scott said re spade bits. I had to do this frequently for my last job, and less so in my shop, but spade/paddle bits went through the wood with all the grace of a junkyard dog, even when I used scrap for backing.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

288 posts in 208 days


#3 posted 06-15-2016 01:15 PM

I’d use a Forstner bit, but would want one better than what I have now (clogs up). So get a good one.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#4 posted 06-15-2016 01:29 PM

I would go with a carbide forstner bit.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1034 days


#5 posted 06-15-2016 01:54 PM

sounds like forstner bit. has the vote.It’s what i was planning on then this morning over coffee the thought popped up,is there a better bit to use.
Is it pronounced: fonz ner or fors ner?

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

880 posts in 1896 days


#6 posted 06-15-2016 02:09 PM

Forstner bit for sure. A hole saw you’ll most likely have to clean the plug out of the saw after every hole which is a PIA if you’re drilling dozens of holes.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#7 posted 06-15-2016 04:43 PM

I want to go against the grain and suggest a 3HP router, template for the holes/locations, and 1/4 carbide bit.
The template could include all the holes AND the spacing so locating the next hole to cut would be a snap.

That just my two “bits” worth as I am a “routerholic”!

Or, how about a CNC …. ?

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Rentvent's profile

Rentvent

148 posts in 308 days


#8 posted 06-15-2016 06:28 PM



I want to go against the grain and suggest a 3HP router, template for the holes/locations, and 1/4 carbide bit.
The template could include all the holes AND the spacing so locating the next hole to cut would be a snap.

That just my two “bits” worth as I am a “routerholic”!

Or, how about a CNC …. ?

- oldnovice

If doing a large quantity, I’d also recommend a plunge router.

You can also use pegboard form the big box store to make a jig.

1) Attach a small square of pegboard to your router base.
2) glue a couple short 1/4” dowel pegs through the holes of the small square in step 1
3) use a bigger piece of pegboard as the template. The pegboard holes are 1/4” round and spaced exactly 1” in each direction.

The picture shows a homemade metal plate for the router, but it can be done with pegboard too.

You can also use a smaller router bit and use this method to make holes for adjustable shelves.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#9 posted 06-16-2016 03:04 AM

Rentvent you like my way of doing things too!
I thought I might have had inhaled too much router dust.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1034 days


#10 posted 06-16-2016 02:51 PM


I want to go against the grain and suggest a 3HP router, template for the holes/locations, and 1/4 carbide bit.
The template could include all the holes AND the spacing so locating the next hole to cut would be a snap.

That just my two “bits” worth as I am a “routerholic”!

Or, how about a CNC …. ?

- oldnovice

If doing a large quantity, I d also recommend a plunge router.

You can also use pegboard form the big box store to make a jig.

1) Attach a small square of pegboard to your router base.
2) glue a couple short 1/4” dowel pegs through the holes of the small square in step 1
3) use a bigger piece of pegboard as the template. The pegboard holes are 1/4” round and spaced exactly 1” in each direction.

The picture shows a homemade metal plate for the router, but it can be done with pegboard too.

You can also use a smaller router bit and use this method to make holes for adjustable shelves.

- Rentvent


Ok so how do you make the circle/hole?or do you use a 1” plunge bit?

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#11 posted 06-16-2016 04:25 PM

The photo above is not mine but I am assuming that the pegboard is the template that the router is following, with the template providing both location and size of the holes.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Rentvent's profile

Rentvent

148 posts in 308 days


#12 posted 06-20-2016 01:15 AM

Yes. 1” plunge bit and set the plunge stop to whatever depth you need. The picture is using a 3/4” plunge bit. The little metal screws on the plate go through the bottom of the plate and into the holes of the pegboard.

Instead of a metal plate and metal pegs, You can fabricate the metal plate in the picture with scrap pegboard.

unplug the router
cut a piece of pegboard like the metal plate in the pic
Put a 1/4” bit in the router and use it to center and hold the piece of pegboard you just cut
attach the piece to your router base
Put a 1/4” dowel through the farthest corners of the base.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#13 posted 06-20-2016 06:16 PM


I want to go against the grain and suggest a 3HP router, template for the holes/locations, and 1/4 carbide bit.
The template could include all the holes AND the spacing so locating the next hole to cut would be a snap.

That just my two “bits” worth as I am a “routerholic”!

Or, how about a CNC …. ?

- oldnovice

If doing a large quantity, I d also recommend a plunge router.

You can also use pegboard form the big box store to make a jig.

1) Attach a small square of pegboard to your router base.
2) glue a couple short 1/4” dowel pegs through the holes of the small square in step 1
3) use a bigger piece of pegboard as the template. The pegboard holes are 1/4” round and spaced exactly 1” in each direction.

The picture shows a homemade metal plate for the router, but it can be done with pegboard too.

You can also use a smaller router bit and use this method to make holes for adjustable shelves.

- Rentvent


Your pegboard jig is nice, but it limits you to 1” increments only.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#14 posted 06-20-2016 06:25 PM

Whatever bit you use, it is imperative that you clamp the work down with a sacrificial board top and bottom. Otherwise you will get tearout. Make sure the bit you use is very sharp. I would suggest a carbide tipped forstner bit. I’m assuming you are using a drill press, so keep the revs high. I’m not sure if they make brad point bits in 1” size; if so, that would work well.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#15 posted 06-20-2016 06:31 PM

Your pegboard jig is nice, but it limits you to 1” increments only.
- MrRon

That can be easily fixed, and for any increment desired.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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