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80v chainsaws taking down trees

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Forum topic by treesner posted 06-15-2016 06:33 AM 749 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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treesner

167 posts in 431 days


06-15-2016 06:33 AM

So I kind of got caught in the habit hole of electric chainsaws, researching the different ones. Went from looking at cheap 18v (ryobi) to 36v (makita two 18v batteries) to 40v (ryobi, oregon, green works) and now i’m seeing that they have 80v ones!

Most of the videos I’ve watched of these cordless saws are just small limbing and pretty slow. The 80v videos show’s guys taking down full sized trees!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mZv2w20J4o

My original plan for this was to have something quite and light enough to carry in a backpack for cutting trails on dirtbike/mtb and also harvesting wood for green woodworking projects. Since I live far from the farm (and all the stihl saws) I would probably end up trying to use this to rough dimension a slab table or two and maybe doing some rough carving with it

What do you guys think, worth gong to the 80v’s?

80v
green works 80v 18” with battery/charger $330
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200638948_200638948?cm_mmc=Google-pla&utm_source=Google_PLA&utm_medium=Logging%20%3E%20Chainsaws&utm_campaign=Greenworks&utm_content=47538&gclid=Cj0KEQjw1v66BRCV-6rh6s-Biu8BEiQAelpui4fQlTO-wNRFIjtkK_Ofa6aEVuFFDQcwzC4hIg9MRh4aAo6v8P8HAQ
—greenworks electric equipment since 2005

kobalt 80v 18” battery/charger $300
http://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-80-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Li-ion-18-in-Cordless-Electric-Chainsaw/50408238
chainsaw carver with added 14” bar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhtDUb3WfUc
—says this cobalt saws is made by greenworks

separate battery $180
charger separately $80

battery lasts 30-45minutes (in normal weather)

////
40V

ryobi 40v 14” battery/charger $260
https://www.amazon.com/Ryobi-RY40511-Cordless-Brushless-Lithium-Ion/dp/B00N3CM2SK/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1465972187&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=ryoboi+40v+chainsaw

green works 40v 16” battery/charger $230
https://www.amazon.com/GreenWorks-20312-DigiPro-Cordless-Chainsaw/dp/B00DRBBRU6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1465972268&sr=8-1&keywords=greenworks+40v+chainsaw

oregon 40v 16” battery/charger $380
https://www.amazon.com/OREGON-CORDLESS-CS300-A6-Battery-Charger/dp/B011NWVS90/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1465972304&sr=8-1&keywords=oregon+40v+chainsaw
—hear good things, feels professional they say


18 replies so far

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 858 days


#1 posted 06-15-2016 11:20 AM

I would say it depends on what you want to do that the 40V saw came up short on.

I have the 40V green works, and have yet to find anything that I want to do with a chainsaw that it can’t handle.

That “that I want to do” part is important. I have cut down many a 12” diameter tree with this thing, and it did it with no problems at all. And some of those were HICKORY trees.

I think it is pretty obvious that a battery operated saw is not going to work well for slabbing.

I think that means to me that about the only place it would seem to make sense to go from a 40V to an 80V would be for felling 2 or 3 foot trees. That’s not something on my todo list, so I don’t expect I’ll ever need to go there.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1187 days


#2 posted 06-15-2016 12:10 PM

I’m a sucker for tinkering with a carburetor, I’ll stick with gas. The cost of a replacement battery alone will probably keep me from ever owning one of these. I do have a 120V chainsaw for a little trim work in the shop when noise/pollution are a concern.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

294 posts in 215 days


#3 posted 06-15-2016 01:32 PM

I had a big gas chainsaw for years, and it gained weight as I got older. So I went for a smaller chainsaw and got a Stihl MS180C, with 16 inch bar. It’s light, powerful and cuts really fast. I expect it’ll be cheaper than a battery model with a couple of batteries.

And go to Harbor Freight and get their $30 electric chain sharpener. I sharpen a lot of chains, and that little unit works great. If you do go with a battery type chainsaw, a sharp chain will be absolutely necessary to not waste battery life.

But still…get a small Stihl gas chainsaw. You won’t be sorry.

View treesner's profile

treesner

167 posts in 431 days


#4 posted 06-15-2016 05:46 PM


I would say it depends on what you want to do that the 40V saw came up short on.

I have the 40V green works, and have yet to find anything that I want to do with a chainsaw that it can t handle.

That “that I want to do” part is important. I have cut down many a 12” diameter tree with this thing, and it did it with no problems at all. And some of those were HICKORY trees.

I think it is pretty obvious that a battery operated saw is not going to work well for slabbing.

I think that means to me that about the only place it would seem to make sense to go from a 40V to an 80V would be for felling 2 or 3 foot trees. That s not something on my todo list, so I don t expect I ll ever need to go there.

- JeffP

I’ve been reading more and it seems like the real thing to look into is the amp of the battery. A 40v saw with a 4ah battery is going to outperform an 80v with a 2ah. So I need to look into the price of these bigger batteries. Seems like a higher amp battery will be cheaper than 80v so probably better to invest there. the 80v do have 2” of bar length on the 40v though

edit:
green works 80v with 2ah battery 18” bar $350
—80v 4ah battery $280! yikes

green works 80v bare tool $170 + 4ah battery $280 + charger $65 = $515

green works 40v with 4ah battery 14” bar $230
—40v 4ah battery $140 (but don’t need this upgrade since it comes with it)

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

700 posts in 854 days


#5 posted 06-15-2016 08:08 PM

I like the electric saw idea but I’m starting to think that Kirk650 is on the right track. The Stihl that he mentions would be cheaper than most of those AND it is also lighter than all of the battery powered one as well. If you are going to be hiking with it, the weight might be the tie breaker. You’ve obviously got to worry about fuel spilling in your backpack but Stihl sells premixed fuel in easy to carry containers that might work.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Dan Wolfgang's profile

Dan Wolfgang

39 posts in 274 days


#6 posted 06-15-2016 08:46 PM

I’m with JeffP: what you want to do is important. I used an Ego 56V chainsaw for a while and found it to be mostly inadequate. For storm cleanup and trimming it is a good solution, but when you want to use it for extended times the trouble comes about. Specifically, I was trying to buck logs for firewood—first I dragged all of the logs to the “firewood area” then started cutting. Lining up like this means I can just cut-cut-cut without breaks in between… which the saw did not like. After not too long thermal overload kicked in and I had to wait for the saw to cool before I could continue. I expect that sawing planks would go the same way. I’d go for gas.

View treesner's profile

treesner

167 posts in 431 days


#7 posted 06-15-2016 08:56 PM


I m with JeffP: what you want to do is important. I used an Ego 56V chainsaw for a while and found it to be mostly inadequate. For storm cleanup and trimming it is a good solution, but when you want to use it for extended times the trouble comes about. Specifically, I was trying to buck logs for firewood—first I dragged all of the logs to the “firewood area” then started cutting. Lining up like this means I can just cut-cut-cut without breaks in between… which the saw did not like. After not too long thermal overload kicked in and I had to wait for the saw to cool before I could continue. I expect that sawing planks would go the same way. I d go for gas.

- Dan Wolfgang

I wouldn’t be using it to buck up wood mainly for cleaning up storm blown trees on the trail which would be semi light work for the saw but as saying I’d like to carve up some big logs and cot out some of this old grown wood that’s already downed and just sitting in the woods.

Besides it being light/clean for backpacking with I also consider the noise to be a big factor. I don’t want people knowing i’m out in the woods cutting things, rather be more stealthy and un bothered

do they make silencers for these small light gas saws?

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treesner

167 posts in 431 days


#8 posted 06-15-2016 08:57 PM

I’m pretty much going into the electric saw thing being aware that i will be disappointed but hoping that I can split up the cuts and make it work for me.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

294 posts in 215 days


#9 posted 06-15-2016 10:02 PM

I probably cut more wood than most of you, for tree removal off fences and to turn into firewood, which is why I have to have a gas chainsaw. A battery powered saw would really not work for me. A little trimming of this or that could probably be done with battery power, but I’m often an hour or two into sawing big limbs or tree trunks. That’s why I don’t really think in terms of battery power. My big Stihl (20 inch bar) is at the Doctor, but the little one has been working hard, as has the gas powered pole saw.

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treesner

167 posts in 431 days


#10 posted 06-15-2016 10:07 PM



I probably cut more wood than most of you, for tree removal off fences and to turn into firewood, which is why I have to have a gas chainsaw. A battery powered saw would really not work for me. A little trimming of this or that could probably be done with battery power, but I m often an hour or two into sawing big limbs or tree trunks. That s why I don t really think in terms of battery power. My big Stihl (20 inch bar) is at the Doctor, but the little one has been working hard, as has the gas powered pole saw.

- Kirk650

Yeah the woods by me don’t go to far before turning running into a neighborhood. When I move to oregon that’ll be when the gas saw earns a spot in the shed.
The reason i’m thinking about the 80v is the hopes of having more power and also the larger bar so that I can harvest a couple of pieces of old growth hear and there and square up some blanks or break down hardwood logs I get from my arborist buddy to use in my woodworking projects

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 858 days


#11 posted 06-15-2016 11:25 PM

The real beauty of a battery powered saw is for the occasional user like me. Other’s here seem to look fondly on the art and science of getting small gas engines to run. That’s not me.

For someone like me, each occasional use of the saw (like every Fall), comes with the annual trip to the small engine guy to get the damn thing working again. My Husqvarna saw got taken apart 2 years ago and fiddled with and fiddled with and finally just got left in a plastic crate in pieces. Hate the damn thing. Going to take it to the small engine guy one more time and then craigslist the damn thing. Did I mention I hate the damn thing?

Anyway, yeah, if you use an alaskan mill or make a lot of firewood, a battery saw isn’t going to cut it.

OTOH, if you just want to bask in the glory of pushing the button and having it spring to life whenever you want to use it…then go battery and don’t look back.

The choice has nothing to do with “power” in my mind…only has to do with continuous operation over long periods. (as has been mentioned above).

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View treesner's profile

treesner

167 posts in 431 days


#12 posted 06-15-2016 11:29 PM



The real beauty of a battery powered saw is for the occasional user like me. Other s here seem to look fondly on the art and science of getting small gas engines to run. That s not me.

For someone like me, each occasional use of the saw (like every Fall), comes with the annual trip to the small engine guy to get the damn thing working again. My Husqvarna saw got taken apart 2 years ago and fiddled with and fiddled with and finally just got left in a plastic crate in pieces. Hate the damn thing. Going to take it to the small engine guy one more time and then craigslist the damn thing. Did I mention I hate the damn thing?

Anyway, yeah, if you use an alaskan mill or make a lot of firewood, a battery saw isn t going to cut it.

OTOH, if you just want to bask in the glory of pushing the button and having it spring to life whenever you want to use it…then go battery and don t look back.

The choice has nothing to do with “power” in my mind…only has to do with continuous operation over long periods. (as has been mentioned above).

- JeffP

you think the power is actually comperable?
what electric saw are you running, do you think i can run cut like an alaskan saw mill for like one or two cuts?
I don’t plan to slap up an entire log just the occasional long rip cut

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

294 posts in 215 days


#13 posted 06-15-2016 11:57 PM

Truth be told, I’d get laughed at here in central Texas if anybody saw me with an electric chainsaw. I have a reputation and self respect to protect. Anyway, the reason I specifically mentioned Stihl is because of all the saws I’ve had, the Stihls keep on running even after sitting for long periods with ethanol type gasoline. My big one (15 years old) is at the doctor due to a busted fuel line.

If an electric chainsaw is all you need, go for it. Just be aware of the limitations of battery power. And keep the chain sharp.

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 858 days


#14 posted 06-16-2016 01:12 AM


The real beauty of a battery powered saw is for the occasional user like me. Other s here seem to look fondly on the art and science of getting small gas engines to run. That s not me.
...

- JeffP

you think the power is actually comperable?
what electric saw are you running, do you think i can run cut like an alaskan saw mill for like one or two cuts?
I don t plan to slap up an entire log just the occasional long rip cut

- treesner

If you have all day, and a trunk to slab up that is more narrow than the 40v saw I have (around 16 inches), you could do it…but I would not recommend it. It would no doubt take several battery swaps. I have never found my saw to be short on torque to keep the chain moving. It also has plenty of battery life to get you through taking down a decent sized tree and buck that into several chunks and de-limb it…but typically just one such tree per battery.

It sounds to me like you should get the 40V and use it where appropriate, and then take your gas saw to the doctor once a year and use it for slabbing and such.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 858 days


#15 posted 06-16-2016 01:14 AM



Truth be told, I d get laughed at here in central Texas if anybody saw me with an electric chainsaw. I have a reputation and self respect to protect. Anyway, the reason I specifically mentioned Stihl is because of all the saws I ve had, the Stihls keep on running even after sitting for long periods with ethanol type gasoline. My big one (15 years old) is at the doctor due to a busted fuel line.

If an electric chainsaw is all you need, go for it. Just be aware of the limitations of battery power. And keep the chain sharp.

- Kirk650

LOL, yeah, I get you.

I own a skid steer and a dually-diesel pickup, so I think my man-card is safe…

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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