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Setting up bandsaw, blade location on tire

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Forum topic by jsmestad posted 06-14-2016 10:12 PM 993 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jsmestad

20 posts in 1149 days


06-14-2016 10:12 PM

I’ve watched a few videos on getting a bandsaw set up and dialed in for use. However I’ve seen conflicting information on having the blade run in the middle of the tire and then others suggesting having teeth of the blade in the middle of the tire (with the rest set a bit further back).

Is it bandsaw model specific? Preference? If it matters I have a Laguna 1412.


12 replies so far

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Trakem2

26 posts in 1513 days


#1 posted 06-14-2016 10:24 PM

Check out “Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass” on youtube. Tells you how to setup and adjust your bandsaw.

-- The old ways worked then, and they still do today! Randy

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jsmestad

20 posts in 1149 days


#2 posted 06-14-2016 10:25 PM


Check out “Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass” on youtube. Tells you how to setup and adjust your bandsaw.

- Trakem2

Yeah this was the one who advised setting the blade teeth to run center on the wheel. If I consult the manual for the Languna 1412 it says the blade should be centered on the tire. Confused on which is right for my saw.

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Trakem2

26 posts in 1513 days


#3 posted 06-14-2016 11:57 PM

I have a Delta benchtop bandsaw and I have set mine to run with teeth in the middle of the tire and it cuts much better and straighter. I would try setting it up both ways and see if you can tell a difference in performance, and then go with which way works best. Trial and error is sometimes the best method.

-- The old ways worked then, and they still do today! Randy

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jsmestad

20 posts in 1149 days


#4 posted 06-15-2016 12:37 AM



I have a Delta benchtop bandsaw and I have set mine to run with teeth in the middle of the tire and it cuts much better and straighter. I would try setting it up both ways and see if you can tell a difference in performance, and then go with which way works best. Trial and error is sometimes the best method.

- Trakem2

Probably the best bet. Ill give that a shot over the weekend.

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Billp

802 posts in 3663 days


#5 posted 06-15-2016 12:48 AM

I agree mine cuts much better with the gullet set to the middle of the tire,big difference.

-- Billp

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#6 posted 06-15-2016 01:08 AM

I tried the snodgrass setup and it worked like a champ.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Oldtool

2373 posts in 1653 days


#7 posted 06-15-2016 01:26 AM

I’ve seen all the videos by the “experts” and the answer to your question is all over the map – so to say. No two videos agree, so what I do is adjust the tracking for the cut that satisfies me. I adjust the tracking and cut straight lines on scrap, until I achieve a cut with no “drift”, and I don’t care where the blade sets on the tire. As I mostly use my bandsaw for resawing, this makes this function much easier.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

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Aj2

689 posts in 1261 days


#8 posted 06-16-2016 04:22 AM

On my 14 inch saw the tire has a crown and it cuts best with the gullet set in the middle of the tire.
On my my 20!inch saw that I use for resawing the tires are flat i set the band to match where it sets on the bottom wheel.
A good blade weld will make a difference.
So here’s my point of view.

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ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1815 days


#9 posted 06-16-2016 03:53 PM

I don’t think that Alex suggests setting the teeth on center, as I recall it is the gullet on center. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

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MrUnix

4221 posts in 1662 days


#10 posted 06-16-2016 04:48 PM

The tracking adjustment is for just that, tracking… not just on the wheel, but for the cut. If you use Alex’s method and put the back of the gullet on the crown of the tire, you are 99% there (or might nail it right off the bat and be done). From there, small tweaks forward or backwards will remove any remaining drift, if any.

Don’t take my, Alex’s or anyone elses word for it… Try it out for yourself and make your own conclusion.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6568 posts in 1613 days


#11 posted 06-16-2016 04:49 PM



Yeah this was the one who advised setting the blade teeth to run center on the wheel. If I consult the manual for the Languna 1412 it says the blade should be centered on the tire. Confused on which is right for my saw.

- jsmestad

No, the video says to put the gullets of the teeth in the center. Don’t center the teeth there. Do it as the video suggests and ignore Laguna’s recommendation.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#12 posted 06-16-2016 05:29 PM

I listened to nonsense like that about ripping your saw apart to shim the wheels so they were co-planar and such, then thought about it, before I dived it. My conclusion was:

1) High end and low end band saw manufacturers had been making them for a long while. By now, it seems, they would have figured out how to build them and set them up. Especially since a good running cheap saw will sell better than a bad running more expensive one.

2) My saw, more often than not, runs good with the wheels out of co-planar. As such, any change in performance would likely be due to other set up issues.

3) As far as blade position on the upper tire goes, I had mixed results re-sawing up to twelve inch stock, until I followed the Timberwolf blade approach – centering the gullet on the top of the crown.

4) Next, the right blade for the job is everything:

(a) When re-sawing, bigger is better, up to the limits of your saw;

(b) Blades with fewer teeth are better in thicker wood, since having fewer teeth allows the blade to clear the sawdust and chips. As such, I try to stay around 3 TPI for wood over a few inches thick;

(c) Finally, use sharp blades. Dull teeth on one or both sides will pull the blade left or right. I’ve even had luck resharpening 1/2” blades for my saw free hand.

(d) Use good blades. If they thump, that means there is drag at one point and suggests a bad blade, which may or may not apply to that brand. Generally, I have good luck with Olsen blades. Recently, I bought four Lenox band saw blades at $25.00 each, rather than the usual $14.00 for Olsens. The Lenox is, supposedly, much better quality. However, unlike my Olsens, the first one is a thumper. I’ll run it anyway to see how it does for longevity (baring a nail or catch).

5) The foregoing aside, the only thing left is the tension, which seems to have nothing to do with the gauge many saws supposedly have. Instead, the 1/4” deflection, with the guides raised about six inches, gets me where I wanted. Some blades may require a bit more or a bit less pressure.

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