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Forum topic by Jim posted 06-12-2016 06:39 PM 491 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim

104 posts in 1127 days


06-12-2016 06:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: mid century help bathroom vanity vanity bent wood cabinets cabinet drawer box sink

I’ve been commissioned by some friends to repurpose some bent plywood pieces to make a bathroom vanity.

I’m a little torn on how to complete it. They want three stacked drawers on one half, and one door on the other. The bent corner pieces are giving me a headache, it’s like picking my poison, do I over complicate the drawers, or the door. I’m almost thinking the drawers need to be on the far right and the door to the left, but hinged in the center…. ugh.

here’s the wood.

Here is my mock up from the dimenions they asked for. The flat rounded corners of the material will be cut off, as will any dowel holes that are in the material currently. On panel will be cut completely to make both of the vertical flat panels. The box will be biscuited together, then assembled just like a regular cabinet, and cantelievered on the wall with steel brackets.

The sink is contemporary, and will be mounted onto the vanity, completely centered.

I’m already planning on doing a partial partition in the center for drawer slides but leaving room for the plumbing. The bent corners though, they are screwing with me. A square drawer box won’t work in the top and bottom position. I’m already planning on ordering them smaller to accomodate the plumbing, but running the drawer fronts wider to keep symmetry.

Any help / ideas would be great.

Jim

-- Jim from Rivertown Woodcraft | Grand Rapids, MI | www.YouTube.com/user/RivertownWoodcraft


5 replies so far

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JBrow

818 posts in 385 days


#1 posted 06-17-2016 03:15 AM

Jim,

About the only idea I have is to add a stile on the curved side of the cabinet, just wide enough to encompass the downward and upward curves in the outer shell. The benefit of this stile is that it squares up the cabinet opening and thus allows placement of the door or drawers wherever you choose to locate them. A front to back plywood panel meeting the stile on the curved side inside of the cabinet could also be added if required, though I am not sure that it is really needed.

The added stile could leave the cabinet with an out of balance appearance. A stile on the opposite side of the cabinet could balance things out. If the opposite side stile is added, I am not sure whether it should be wider or narrower than the curved side stile. The curved corners are likely to trick the eye. A couple of scaled drawings or mock-ups could answer this question.

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Jim

104 posts in 1127 days


#2 posted 06-17-2016 11:13 AM



Jim,

About the only idea I have is to add a stile on the curved side of the cabinet, just wide enough to encompass the downward and upward curves in the outer shell. The benefit of this stile is that it squares up the cabinet opening and thus allows placement of the door or drawers wherever you choose to locate them. A front to back plywood panel meeting the stile on the curved side inside of the cabinet could also be added if required, though I am not sure that it is really needed.

The added stile could leave the cabinet with an out of balance appearance. A stile on the opposite side of the cabinet could balance things out. If the opposite side stile is added, I am not sure whether it should be wider or narrower than the curved side stile. The curved corners are likely to trick the eye. A couple of scaled drawings or mock-ups could answer this question.

- JBrow

Thanks Jim, I did approach my client with this idea a few days ago, and the unbalanced look worries him. I’m pushing for mounting the door on the left side, avoiding drawers near the curved corners, but also hinging that door int h center. Weird yes, but at least it will open to the room / toilet that will be to the vanities left.

I’ll post updates as I go.

James

-- Jim from Rivertown Woodcraft | Grand Rapids, MI | www.YouTube.com/user/RivertownWoodcraft

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rhett

734 posts in 3132 days


#3 posted 06-17-2016 12:01 PM

It only needs to look curved from the front. Put a straight wall inside against the curve, recessed back the thickness of a drawer front. Built square drawers, then mount an inset drawer front, asymmetrical on the drawer, with the matching curve transposed to the one side.

That’s how I would approach this situation.

-- Doubt kills more dreams than failure.

View Jim's profile

Jim

104 posts in 1127 days


#4 posted 06-17-2016 01:23 PM



It only needs to look curved from the front. Put a straight wall inside against the curve, recessed back the thickness of a drawer front. Built square drawers, then mount an inset drawer front, asymmetrical on the drawer, with the matching curve transposed to the one side.

That s how I would approach this situation.

- rhett

I’ve also considered this, and may be the way we go. Only issue is we are already doing on at the center, shrinking the drawers away from plumbing, since the sink is completely center mounter.

Still a great option, if not for (something like) 6” wide drawer boxes lol

-- Jim from Rivertown Woodcraft | Grand Rapids, MI | www.YouTube.com/user/RivertownWoodcraft

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#5 posted 06-19-2016 06:18 AM

I’m not sure how you might apply this idea in your project, but it is one way to solve the problem of drawers that need to accommodate plumbing. In my case, I applied them to the backs of the doors. Could easily be adapted for a drawer, however, that would hinge at one side, and rotate outward. The curve leaves ample gap at the back when closed for the plumbing. Would also work for a corner desk or hutch, where you are forced to make a stair-stepped drawer that slides in and out. I’ve seen them, and they look awkward to make and kind of ugly. I think a pivot out drawer would be much cooler.

The bent parts are simply 2 layers of 1/8” plywood bent with heat, then laminated. (I used 6 mm ply because that’s what I had, but it was really too thick). Bend with a heat gun, then glue up the lamination. Easy peasy. The rest of the “box” is obviously straightforward.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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