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Help with window trim and casing

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Forum topic by BethFraser posted 06-11-2016 01:27 AM 817 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BethFraser

11 posts in 283 days


06-11-2016 01:27 AM

I moved into a house that the old trim had been removed. So I have a big picture window I am attempting to do a simple arts & crafts style. This is the first time I have tried to trim a window and I am confused. I have looked at some videos and other site but not sure how to apply to my specific window.

Here are some pictures.

1. How much do I cover the casing? The casing is not straight. You can see on this photo where I tried to match the uneven trim but now it looks too wavy and looks like crap. Do I make the piece wider to cover more of the inner window casing?

This is what it looks like without the trim I added.

I am adding these little decorative supports ( I don’t know what they are called) but I dont know how to finish them. I plan on painting them, but I dont know if I should just sand the corners or use a router?

I am just overwhelmed, any suggestions are welcome.


11 replies so far

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BethFraser

11 posts in 283 days


#1 posted 06-11-2016 01:38 AM

I am sorry the photos are not loading in the right orientation. I have tried to reupload but it doesn’ t change.

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#2 posted 06-11-2016 01:56 AM

I would just ease the edges with some sandpaper Beth. Sharp edges don’t hold paint well, but it doesn’t need much. Presumably your casing will be shallower than the corner blocks. You need to make sure not to round the edges more than the thickness of the casing boards.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#3 posted 06-11-2016 01:57 AM

Hi Beth
I think of you do a google search for wood window trim under “images”it will give you some good examples.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Sawdust35

18 posts in 329 days


#4 posted 06-11-2016 02:07 AM

I am about 70% done with my Arts/Crafts trim install on my house. I’ve been using the trim provided by www.windsorone.com
1) Where are you planning on installing the wood corbels/brackets?
2) Based on the different Arts and Crafts trim I have seen, most casing has a simple 1/8” round-over router profile.
3) I have installed some trim similar to yours. If it were me, I would install the casing (vertical boards) recessed relative to the header frieze (top horizontal board).
4) If the window frame isn’t even or out of level/plum, you will have to work with what you have. If it is out of plum by 1/4” the reveal will look odd if your casing is plum. Maybe split the difference and install the casing out of plum by 1/8”.
5) About your 2nd image in the original post, I would install a piece of trim that is wide enough to yield a reveal that is equal to or similar to the reveal created by the header frieze and the outer piece of trim. I try to maintain a 1/4” reveal around each window (excluding the sill) and door.

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BethFraser

11 posts in 283 days


#5 posted 06-11-2016 06:04 PM

Thanks for the replies. I need to study the components of the window. I realize I didnt understand many of the coponents that were referenced.

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canadianchips

2360 posts in 2464 days


#6 posted 06-11-2016 06:50 PM

You do not have to know the technical names to build it. Some tricks that hide uneven walls, ceilings and floors are helpful.
In old days a bead was made to help do that. Took the eye away from 2 uneven lines.
Eg. Use a “drip cap” between jamb and frieze.
I typically try for 1/8” reveal. That is only MY preference !
(That cat is amazing, Can sit on vertical wall like that ) lol

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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BethFraser

11 posts in 283 days


#7 posted 06-11-2016 06:50 PM

I did more research and I am still confused. I think these two verticle components might be the stop or jamb? How do I align the trim to this?

Or are those pieces just part of the window and should I create the casing and stop like this image?

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BethFraser

11 posts in 283 days


#8 posted 06-11-2016 07:06 PM

Okay, I think I understand, canadianchip. Ill try a sample section and see how that looks. Thanks.

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Sawdust35

18 posts in 329 days


#9 posted 06-11-2016 10:24 PM

Since you probably have moving parts in at least one of the windows (mechanism that balances the sash as you open it). I would identify how far you can nail into the frame of the window without putting a nail in the path of these moving parts. IIRC, I have used shorter brads to secure trim to my window when faced with this situation.

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EEngineer

1061 posts in 3080 days


#10 posted 06-11-2016 11:51 PM

How much do I cover the casing? The casing is not straight.
I sympathize – I own an almost 100 year old house and there isn’t a plumb doorframe or window casing in the house after 90+ years of settling. What I have found is that you always plumb the trim, don’t match the unplumb or crooked doorframe or window casing. Your eye will always be drawn to the trim.

My opinion, YMMV.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

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BethFraser

11 posts in 283 days


#11 posted 06-27-2016 12:41 AM

Here is an in progress photo. I decided to make a shelf at the top to give my cats something to walk on.

I dont understand why it uploads upside down. Ugh

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