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Forum topic by jody495 posted 06-09-2016 02:08 AM 982 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jody495

36 posts in 2344 days


06-09-2016 02:08 AM

I was just wondering if anyone has a rotozip tool and what you use it for. I have had one for about 15 years and only used it once in a finished home to cut plaster,BIG mistake! Plaster dust everywhere. What do you use yours for?’


24 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

932 posts in 1718 days


#1 posted 06-09-2016 02:18 AM

Cutting holes in drywall around outlet boxes. Next to my router, my rotozip is the tool I’m most afraid of.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View ThistleDown's profile

ThistleDown

42 posts in 441 days


#2 posted 06-09-2016 02:22 AM

My wife got me one and I used it once to cut drywall holes. It never cut a good hole and made so much dust and noise I put it back in the box. Looks good on the tool shelf.

-- My biggest fear is that when I am gone, my wife will sell my tools for what I told her I paid for them.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1419 posts in 2790 days


#3 posted 06-09-2016 02:27 AM

drywall, outlet boxes, and really handy when tapping into the AC/heating main trunk to add a vent.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2490 posts in 1748 days


#4 posted 06-09-2016 04:25 AM

Cutouts for electrical boxes, as above. Works great for that, mainly because you can set the depth of cut to just reach through the drywall, thus not endangering wiring or anything else that might be lurking inside the walls. But I have since come to prefer (by a wide margin) the oscillating multi tool (I like HF’s version). Will do everything the Roto Zip will do, plus a lot more.

But all of them create a massive amount of dust in drywall or plaster.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

122 posts in 1357 days


#5 posted 06-09-2016 04:33 AM

I have a Craftsman version. I use it mostly for filling a void on a shelf.

-- Mike - Eagle, WI

View jody495's profile

jody495

36 posts in 2344 days


#6 posted 06-09-2016 08:07 AM

Any times I cut dry wall now I tend to use a sawzall with a short bi-metal blade making sure there are no pipes or wire’s where I’m cutting. All the dust drops straight to the floor.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

469 posts in 849 days


#7 posted 06-09-2016 09:26 PM



Any times I cut dry wall now I tend to use a sawzall with a short bi-metal blade making sure there are no pipes or wire s where I m cutting. All the dust drops straight to the floor.

- jody495

I bought a cheap “multi-tool” and use that with the drywall/wood blade that came with it. Wish I had that tool decades ago.

View nkawtg's profile

nkawtg

254 posts in 975 days


#8 posted 06-09-2016 09:42 PM

I’ve got an older one, I use it to grind, cut metal, and as a trim router.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2548 posts in 2645 days


#9 posted 06-09-2016 09:52 PM

Boat anchor?

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

170 posts in 794 days


#10 posted 06-10-2016 12:47 AM



Boat anchor?

- Jim Finn

This.

I was feeling sorta nostalgic when I got mine out of the truck, last week. I was cutting can-light holes in a Woodhaven ceiling that I was installing. This stuff is made out of MDF and a plastic coating. I felt like I smoked 3 packs that day….ugh. Never again….that’s for sure.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1672 posts in 2347 days


#11 posted 06-10-2016 02:40 AM

Mine is a dedicated hinge mortiser.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

424 posts in 1308 days


#12 posted 06-10-2016 05:15 AM

I had one for years also. Almost can’t recall why I ever thought I wanted it. I decided the tool storage space was way more useful, so the whole kit went to a local charity for resell in their thrift shop. That was the best thing I ever did with it, I’m certain.
,

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View JIMMIEM's profile

JIMMIEM

40 posts in 565 days


#13 posted 06-10-2016 11:16 AM

Drywall cutting. Plywood sheathing on house….this was before multi tools were reasonably priced. Best use was enlarging a hole in a tile wall using a diamond bit….the larger hole allowed the use of a toggle bolt instead of a plastic anchor which kept pulling out. Circle cutting jig is quite useful….have made some plywood circles. Don’t think I buy one again but I was fascinated by the original infomercial. It has its uses….mostly drywall work.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4554 posts in 2217 days


#14 posted 06-10-2016 11:57 AM

I use mine for outlet opening in drywall, besides that: nothing. It’s almost as little used as the useless PC detail sander I bought.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2490 posts in 1748 days


#15 posted 06-10-2016 08:48 PM

I have one of those PC detail sanders, too. Got it in a pawn shop. Someday I may have to refinish a roll top desk. Figure it will do well on the tambour’s slats. Other than that, it fills a space on a shelf.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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