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Drum Sander and 180 Grit Cloggage

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Forum topic by Keith Kelly posted 06-08-2016 07:01 PM 482 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1124 days


06-08-2016 07:01 PM

I’m about to make a SuperGrit order, and am considering going for a 180g bulk roll for my Performax.

However, the two individual strips I’ve used so far seemed to clog and become unusable crazy quick (at least compared to the 120 I use 95% of the time). I feel that my dust collection is good, but perhaps I wasn’t cleaning the roll often enough, or perhaps I was trying to take off too much at once.

Do you find 180g to be a grit you use a lot? And, does it seem to wear far faster than 120, or was it likely due to my overagressiveness?

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com


14 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#1 posted 06-08-2016 07:44 PM

keith
That’s really too fine a grit for a drum sander even a very light passes ,some soft woods will clog it quicker than others.
You can clean the clogged belts by spraying them with a product called Krud kutter and then brushing with a stiff brush.

http://www.amazon.com/Supreme-Chemical-Original-Concentrated-Cleaner/dp/B000LNRNPQ?ie=UTF8&keywords=krud%20kutter%20cleaner%20degreaser&qid=1465415000&ref_=sr_1_3_a_it&sr=8-3

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1907 days


#2 posted 06-08-2016 07:49 PM

For my drum sander I find the 100 grit is the most suitable sandpaper,even the 120 Grit is clogging a bit too often for my liking.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

826 posts in 682 days


#3 posted 06-08-2016 07:58 PM

180 is about as fine as I’ll go. I’ll also keep the thickness changes to under 1/4 turn per pass (1/64”) as deeper cuts inevitably burn the wood and foul the belt..

A Cleaning Stick is a good item to use for maintenance. As far as my most common grit, 120 gets the nod for the first pass (and sometimes last).

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3927 posts in 1953 days


#4 posted 06-08-2016 09:29 PM

I gave up on anything above 150 grit completely, and generally settled on 120 for 99% of my stuff. All due to the clogging/burning/etc.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4448 posts in 3421 days


#5 posted 06-08-2016 09:40 PM

“CLOGGAGE”? Is that a new word?
Back to the use of the correct grit for the job.
180 is WAY too fine for the job.
Just couldn’t help with the comment on the new term.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2176 posts in 1485 days


#6 posted 06-09-2016 04:59 AM

You don’t like “cloggage”? Heck, I think it’s a great coinage. From a friend who worked in construction i learned “levelocity” and “verticality,” plus others that don’t come to mind right now. How “evenocity” or “flushage” when things line up nicely?

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

728 posts in 2526 days


#7 posted 06-09-2016 11:25 AM

I too top out at 120 on my 16-32 Performax. Above that the sanding media clogs too quick to be of any use for very long even when using a dust eraser. Cloggage works for me too in this time of twisted linguistics.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#8 posted 06-09-2016 11:32 AM

I have a dual drum and find 80/100 the best combo. Even these will clog, tho.

The giant eraser cleaners work best to remove the cloggage ;-

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1975 days


#9 posted 06-09-2016 11:36 AM

I don’t own a drum sander, but I get “cloggage” when I don’t eat my fiber…

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1194 posts in 472 days


#10 posted 06-09-2016 11:43 AM

120 is about as fine as I will go on those, I try to stick with 100 and then clean up the rest by hand. I don’t use my sander for finishing, I have used it to replace my planer and have been happy with it, no snipe and a lot quieter. I bought some 36 grit and boy does it take off some wood quick if you need to.

-- Brian Noel

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

826 posts in 682 days


#11 posted 06-09-2016 02:32 PM

I usually only go past 120 for parts that are prominent or otherwise need to be dead flat. The reason being is it usually takes a fair amount of post-drum-sander cleanup with a ROS to get rid of the linear scratches. If I stop at 120 on the drum sander, I’ll hit the piece with 100 on my ROS and then go finer. Hard woods like oak often take a number of passes with the ROS to fully eliminate the scratches. Going to 180 makes this job a lot easier and faster.

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 402 days


#12 posted 06-09-2016 03:12 PM



I don t own a drum sander, but I get “cloggage” when I don t eat my fiber…

- Tennessee


I thought cloggage were dancers.

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1124 days


#13 posted 06-09-2016 04:00 PM



I usually only go past 120 for parts that are prominent or otherwise need to be dead flat. The reason being is it usually takes a fair amount of post-drum-sander cleanup with a ROS to get rid of the linear scratches. If I stop at 120 on the drum sander, I ll hit the piece with 100 on my ROS and then go finer. Hard woods like oak often take a number of passes with the ROS to fully eliminate the scratches. Going to 180 makes this job a lot easier and faster.

- splintergroup

This here aligns with my thoughts as I posted this. It’s interesting you note that after 120 on drum, you go 100 on ROS. I have been bugged that going 120 on drum, then 150 on ROS seems to be super ineffective/inefficient. Hard woods taking a bunch of ROS passes…yes, and that is frustrating trying to get out those lines. You mention 1/4 turn. Yikes. That’s slow, but lack of doing that could be the cause of my problems earlier.

So, it sounds like I ought to focus on the 100/120 range, and take real light passes if 180 is used.

Thanks for the helppage.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

826 posts in 682 days


#14 posted 06-10-2016 06:35 PM


This here aligns with my thoughts as I posted this. It s interesting you note that after 120 on drum, you go 100 on ROS. I have been bugged that going 120 on drum, then 150 on ROS seems to be super ineffective/inefficient. Hard woods taking a bunch of ROS passes…yes, and that is frustrating trying to get out those lines. You mention 1/4 turn. Yikes. That s slow, but lack of doing that could be the cause of my problems earlier.

So, it sounds like I ought to focus on the 100/120 range, and take real light passes if 180 is used.

Thanks for the helppage.

- Keith Kelly

We are here to serve 8^)

The depth of cut depends somewhat on the sander and airflow. I have a 16/32 and good airflow (gets the dust off the drum ASAP).
If you try to cut too fast, the drum cannot clear efficiently and it begins to clog (and heat up). Speaking of heat, resinous woods (like pine) and woods with glue lines can really foul up a belt quickly when the heat from the belt causes the sap/glue to soften up.

For me in general, 36 grit gets a 1/2 turn (1/32”) per pass., 80/120 grit will get 1/4 turn, and 180 grit usually gets 1/8 turn if I suspect things may be getting close to fouling.

Either way, I’ll always use a ROS with a grit one step (sometimes two steps) below the final drum sander grit. Surfaces get checked with a strong side light to confirm all the linear scratches from the drum are gone before I work up the grit chain. Of course this is only for finished surfaces. If the surface is to be glued, I’ll quit at 120 on the drum sander and go directly to glue-up.

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