LumberJocks

Changing Band saw tires

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by CanKuhn posted 04-19-2010 06:46 AM 8049 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View CanKuhn's profile

CanKuhn

26 posts in 2478 days


04-19-2010 06:46 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw tire

I’m a woodshop teacher and my bandsaw tires need changing. Not ever doing that does anyone out there have any how to tips? Also do you need to use some kind of glue to adhere the tire to the wheel. The Bandsaw is a Powermatic 14” Bandsaw

-- Wood is Good!


12 replies so far

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 2897 days


#1 posted 04-19-2010 02:18 PM

I second rick3ddd… more info here would be helpful.

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View CanKuhn's profile

CanKuhn

26 posts in 2478 days


#2 posted 04-19-2010 02:30 PM

It is a Powermatic 14” Bandsaw

-- Wood is Good!

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2536 days


#3 posted 04-19-2010 03:09 PM

Most people today prefer the urethane tires instead of the more traditional rubber tires. I have installed urethane tires on my bandsaw. You do not need any glue. You do need a lot of strength and a couple of big screwdrivers to help leverage them into place. They are very tight.

You’ll use a large screwdriver to leverage them into place and you should initially end up with a screwdriver between the wheel and the tire. Before you remove the screwdriver, “walk” it around the wheel a couple of times. You simply turn the screwdriver and it should move in the opposite direction. This evens out the tension around the wheel.

Good luck.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2536 days


#4 posted 04-19-2010 06:16 PM

One more thing – I know some people heat the tires up by putting them in hot water. In theory, that makes them a little easier to stretch. I’ve not done that, but I know others have.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1610 posts in 2923 days


#5 posted 04-19-2010 06:55 PM

Changing bandsaw tires can be as easy as you make it. You have 2 options when it comes to replacements. You can go with rubber and have to cement them in place, crown them, like the original factory or replace with urethane. Personally I like the urethane. They come precrowned and do not require cement to keep them in place. I recently installed a set of urethane tires on my Delta 14” saw and they have been wonderful. All that was required was to remove ALL of the old dried, caked rubber cement, heat up a pan of water to approximately 110 degrees and allow the tires to come up to temp. Carefully stretch the tire over the wheel, think replacing a bicycle tire. I would not use a screw driver as it could damage the tire. I like to use short pieces of 3/8 to 1/2” dowels to “walk” the new tire on the wheel. The urethane tires will be ready to use as soon as they are on the wheel. If you opt to replace with rubber they will need to be set aside to allow the glue to dry and then need to be crowned. Here is an option for replacing rubber tires on a slightly larger wheel.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3135 days


#6 posted 04-20-2010 12:47 AM

Urethane is nice for the smaller bandsaws (14”). The larger wheels on big saws (20+) can throw the tire if it isn’t glued down so black rubber/glue for those.

View CanKuhn's profile

CanKuhn

26 posts in 2478 days


#7 posted 04-20-2010 06:56 AM

Thanks for your help everybody. I ordered this: Wheel Tire I’m thinking that is rubber. If so any suggestions on were to go to get Urethane tires. I searched the web a little and found THIS Is the price right?

-- Wood is Good!

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3198 days


#8 posted 04-20-2010 07:19 AM

I know the Hartville tire is the correct one for Delta Rockwell 14” band saws. You will want to make sure your Powermatic inside width of the wheel is also 1” wide. It should be if it is a true clone.
I also recommend you use the Urethane tires. They are great.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

14167 posts in 3444 days


#9 posted 07-28-2014 01:13 AM

Thanks to this blog I got my tire on without too much head ache.
I heated a bowl of water in the micro wave and soaked the urethane in the water to make it a little more pliable and used small c-clamps to help hole the tire.’’’ sort of like four extra hands ’’’ and- the- 2- large- screw-driver method to walk it on the rest of the way. I’m making it sound easier then it actually was, but I got it on.
Bandsaw is back in the saddle.

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2099 days


#10 posted 12-06-2015 09:22 PM

This old thread helped me out!

Only Hercules could put that tire on my 17” Grizzly without the hot water soak. I just used about a gallon of hottest water from my tap. While the tire soaked, I warmed the wheel with a hair dryer. Pulled the tire out, dryed with paper towels them with hair dryer. Two screwdrivers to lever it on.

View BurlyBob's profile (online now)

BurlyBob

3659 posts in 1727 days


#11 posted 12-06-2015 09:32 PM

I made some thinner wood wedges about 8” long and used paste wax to help them slide. Heated the tires in hot water and they went on real easy. I went with the wood as I had this unnerving thought around 0330 of the tire getting ripped when I pried in on with a screwdriver. Go ahead call me a nervous Nellie. But my way worked just fine for me.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2099 days


#12 posted 12-08-2015 07:44 PM

The screwdrivers have smooth, round shafts. The tire was levered on with the round shafts, not on the blade part. But whatever works as long as no damage was done. It was about 50 F in my shop, so hot water bath definitely helped, but was wary of having the wheel rust if I put the tire on wet, so I dried it first.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com