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Forum topic by TMcG posted 06-06-2016 09:32 PM 561 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TMcG

191 posts in 2463 days


06-06-2016 09:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing epoxy boat cockpit table

I’m building a cockpit table for my boat and am planning on using an epoxy finish and then having a clear finish sprayed on to final finish and provide better UV protection.

I’m hoping someone can help me understand how to apply the epoxy to both sides of the table, it’ll be oval with a roundover from both top and bottom, kinda like a bullnose profile but “sharper”, on the sides.

Appreciate it

-- http://wood.mcgivern.org


9 replies so far

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#1 posted 06-06-2016 11:31 PM

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ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 394 days


#2 posted 06-07-2016 01:19 AM

What type of wood is it made of ?

-- PJ

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TMcG

191 posts in 2463 days


#3 posted 06-07-2016 03:23 AM

Thanks for the links, problem is they don’t really talk about an all sides type deal.

Oh, yeah, that probably would have been a pertinent point.

It’s Teak

-- http://wood.mcgivern.org

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#4 posted 06-07-2016 05:28 AM

You can ‘paint’ on epoxy if you do thin coats. I’d do the bottom first, clean up any drips or runs after cured, and then do the top. But it’s not the best of finishes, particularly if exposed to the elements – even if clear coated with something that provides some UV protection, it will fail eventually. For teak, I’d just leave it alone and give it a good oil once a year. That is why you rarely see teak on a boat that has any kind of finish on it other than oil.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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TMcG

191 posts in 2463 days


#5 posted 06-07-2016 05:46 PM

Yep, though brightwork and cockpit tables are somewhat of a different family. I have a teak cockpit and am very familiar with maintaining that.

I’ve used Epoxy as a finish before, liquid glass etc… but only for interior tops, ie the bottom of the table is finished differently and was hoping someone might have solved the riddle/trick of doing both top and bottom

-- http://wood.mcgivern.org

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ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 394 days


#6 posted 06-08-2016 12:39 AM

My cockpit table is teak and red cedar, finished with 6-8 coats of Épiphane varnish, should get a fresh coat this year after 8 years of abuse.

Oil on teak is not the best of finishes, I’ve maintained teak decks many years with oil that required yearly major restauration. Cetol can go many years without having to strip and redo, my record is 8 years before striping, sanding and recoating. It helps to add a coat every spring and touch-up scratches before water gets below the finish.

-- PJ

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#7 posted 06-08-2016 01:51 AM



Thanks for the links, problem is they don t really talk about an all sides type deal.

Have something to support the table, and cover it with polyethylene plastic sheet, which epoxy won’t stick to.
Do the bottom first, then flip it over and do the top while the bottom is still wet. And irregular spots froim resting on the plastic will easily sand out flat.
When cured, sand and repeat. You probably want 3 coats.

But it’s not the best of finishes, particularly if exposed to the elements

When used as a base coat under a UV marine varnish, epoxy has been proven to greatly increase the life of a finish.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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TMcG

191 posts in 2463 days


#8 posted 06-08-2016 03:35 AM

Awesome, thanks

Yes, the final finish will be 2-3 coats of Awlgrip Clear sprayed on by a friend with a paintshop.

-- http://wood.mcgivern.org

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2406 days


#9 posted 06-09-2016 07:20 AM

I used to by my epoxy in the five gallon buckets (both part a and b). I poured a lot of strange shapes. One like yours I do a side at a time.

I used tongue depressers to move the finish off the plastic protecting the table back onto the vertical surfaces it flowed off of. I just broke the depressers about 3/4 the way down to the bottom angled and worked good as a spatula. I kept working the mix back in place throughout the short set time, which was about twenty minutes.

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