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Used Delta 34-761 vs new Delta 36-725

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Forum topic by Mbe5003 posted 06-06-2016 06:13 AM 662 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mbe5003

5 posts in 181 days


06-06-2016 06:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw delta unisaw rockwell

I’m looking for a new table saw, I’ve been keeping my eye on craigslist and havent found anything I wanted until this used 34-761 Delta/Rockwell Unisaw came up for $600. It looks like it’s I’m great shape runs on 110 or 220 and has a jet lock style fence.

Prior to this saw coming up I was looking at a new delta 36-725 from lowes for $599 minus my 10% military discount.

I’m a hobiest woodworker and like to make odds and ends of furniture plus I just bought a house so plenty of projects around the house to work on. I’m coming from a cheap black and Decker table saw that was my trial run at woodworking. It worked alright but obviously had its flaws.

The biggest thing I’m looking for is precision out of the saw and being able to set the fence and know that it’s square without measuring a few dozen times and I’d obviously like it to power through any wood that the average woodworker would be cutting.

I have a decent sized shop and both saws have wheels to be mobile.

One advantage of the new saw is that it has a wider ripping capacity than the older unisaw.

So which saw should I get and what are the pros and cons of each?

Thanks in advance,
Mike


14 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

612 posts in 1022 days


#1 posted 06-06-2016 12:14 PM

I believe the 34-761 is a right tilt. The 36-725 is a left tilt. I like left tilt.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

140 posts in 202 days


#2 posted 06-06-2016 12:21 PM

Just my 2 cents:
I recently went from an old craftsman to the 36-725, and absolutely love it. Set up was easy, and aligning the blade and fence to the miter slots was a piece of cake. I’ve tried moving the fence and locking it down in several different positions, measuring each time, and it seems almost impossible to knock it out of parallel with the blade once it’s set, unless you do it deliberately. As a bonus, if you like the end of your fence a fraction farther from the blade to prevent binding, making those adjustments are as easy as turning a screw.
Plus, the built-in mobile base makes maneuvering it around really easy, and there’s plenty of space on the right side of the table to add a router table, if you’re so inclined.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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Mbe5003

5 posts in 181 days


#3 posted 06-06-2016 02:26 PM

Would I gain anything in precision or some other area with the older saw?

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#4 posted 06-06-2016 02:54 PM

The Unisaw would likely have a Biesemeyer, Unifence, or jetlock fence….do you know for sure which? Also, what’s the horsepower of the motor? (I’m assuming 2hp or less if 120v is an option for it….be sure it’s single phase though). Can you post pics of the Uni? That’d help us a lot.

Under the hood isn’t much of a contest if the Uni is in decent shape:

36-725:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Dustin

140 posts in 202 days


#5 posted 06-06-2016 04:08 PM

Man, Knotscott, you took it easy on the comparison…was kinda expecting the last picture to be of an el camino :p

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#6 posted 06-06-2016 05:02 PM


Man, Knotscott, you took it easy on the comparison…was kinda expecting the last picture to be of an el camino :p

- Dustin


;-)

I just noticed that the OP mentioned the jetlock fence. Not my favorite for sure, but it’s ok. I’d have to give the fence nod to the 36-725. If it’d been a Biese or Unifence, the decision would be easy for me, but it’s really a matter of opinion.

Precision really boils down to things like bearings, pulley alignment, fence alignment, setup, blade, arbor runout, etc., which are variables. Both have potential for good precision and accuracy. The Unisaw is a much beefier unit. That doesn’t necessarily correlate to better short term precision, but longer term should favor the Unisaw, which is an industrial cabinet saw made for years/decades of hard service. The Unisaw should hold it’s value better. In 3 years I’d guess the Unisaw will be worth roughly what it’s worth today. The 36-725 will be closer to half of today’s going rate. Mike will have to weigh the Unisaw’s pros and cons to the warranty, left tilt, riving knife, and that new car smell of the 36-725, depending on what’s most important.

My view is that I like the basic bone structure of the older Unisaw better…most of it’s current drawbacks can be easily remedied. It’s much harder to remedy the drawbacks of a lighter duty saw (it is what it is), though it may be sufficient enogh to give years go good service, depending on what it’ll be asked to do and what the expectations are. I’d be inclined to make an offer for the Unisaw in the $500 range, sell the jetlock fence for $50-75, and buy a Delta T3 from HD for around $125 out of pocket. That’d give me a Unisaw with T3 fence for around $625. :-)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Dustin

140 posts in 202 days


#7 posted 06-06-2016 06:07 PM

Ha! That’s more like it :D
Also, sage advice re the purchasing of the unisaw. Wish more stuff like that was available in my area, but months of perusing craigslist led to disappointing/no results. FWIW, even my inclination is to go with a bigger, beefier saw, but a close examination of my facilities (garage) and needs (small) really make it overkill for the foreseeable future.
It’s why I’m the only genius on the block mowing my 1/4 acre plot with a riding mower…

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Mbe5003's profile

Mbe5003

5 posts in 181 days


#8 posted 06-06-2016 07:37 PM

I really appreciate the advice on it all, I will upload a picture of the saw for sale, it is definitely single phase, he says its 110/220v 24/12 amp so I believe that works out to a 2 hp motors. He said he could do $550, but really didn’t want to drop any more in price than that. I can obviously offer whatever I want, but I want to be realistic and not insulting either.

Any idea what the unisaw may weigh? I am military and do have to move every couple years and am already over my allowable weight limit (4 kids and many hobbies will do that). I don’t expect the weight difference between the two saws to make or break my decision one way or the other, just curious.

I enjoy the vehicular comparisons, I do drive a 2001 Ford Powerstroke so my inclination is to definitely go with the beefier machine.

Thanks again and any more advice would be great,
Mike

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Mbe5003

5 posts in 181 days


#9 posted 06-06-2016 07:40 PM

Also, what is the main advantage of the left tilt vs right tilt? I can see you’d get a little more ripping capacity out of the left tilt and also the blade would be away from your hand/push stick as you’re feeding but is there something specific that I’m missing?

And what are the draw backs to the jet lock style fence?

Mike

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#10 posted 06-06-2016 07:48 PM

Best guess is that it’d weigh around 500# with that motor and fence.

The left tilt/right tilt debate is largely a matter of preference. There are pros and cons with each. Right tilt bevels toward the fence on a standard bevel cut, which is considered less safe than if it beveled away from the fence. You can move the fence to the left of the blade for safer bevel cuts, but that makes it a non-standard operation, which is still not quite as safe as a bevel cut on a left tilt saw until you get used to it. On Left tilt saws the blade bevels away from the fence with the fence on the right of the blade (standard location), which is considered safer.

The downside of a left tilt saw is that any changes in blade thickness will skew the zero reference on the tape measure because the left side of the blade registers on the right side of the flange (the same direction as the tape measure reads). This can be adjusted by recalibrating the cursor, always using blades of the same thickness, using shims as spacers, or just measuring by hand. Blade thickness changes make no difference with a right tilt saw because the right side of the blade registers against the left side of the flange, so changes in blade thickness don’t impact the tape measure. The arbor nut on a right tilt saw gets applied from the left side of the blade and uses a reverse thread orientation, which is typically done with your left hand. The arbor nut on a left tilt saw goes on from the right side (easy for right handers) and uses a normal thread orientation. On a lift tilt saw you can slide the rails farther to the right because there’s little to no need for wasted capacity on the left.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View CyberDyneSystems's profile

CyberDyneSystems

220 posts in 1650 days


#11 posted 06-07-2016 02:42 AM


I really appreciate the advice on it all, I will upload a picture of the saw for sale, it is definitely single phase, he says its 110/220v 24/12 amp so I believe that works out to a 2 hp motors. He said he could do $550, but really didn t want to drop any more in price than that. I can obviously offer whatever I want, but I want to be realistic and not insulting either.

Any idea what the unisaw may weigh? I am military and do have to move every couple years and am already over my allowable weight limit (4 kids and many hobbies will do that). I don t expect the weight difference between the two saws to make or break my decision one way or the other, just curious.

I enjoy the vehicular comparisons, I do drive a 2001 Ford Powerstroke so my inclination is to definitely go with the beefier machine.

Thanks again and any more advice would be great,
Mike

- Mbe5003

Looks great! If it powers up, I’d take that for $550.00 Sweet.

-- Without the wood, it's just working

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Mbe5003

5 posts in 181 days


#12 posted 06-10-2016 11:26 PM

I’m going to look at the saw tomorrow and hopefully pick it up, anything in particular I should look out for?

Mike

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

185 posts in 1676 days


#13 posted 06-11-2016 01:02 AM

@knotscott,

That’s one of the cleanest left vs right tilt explanations I’ve seen. Hitting the major high points. While I like my left tilt, I do really dislike having to remember that 1/32 when I change blades.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#14 posted 06-11-2016 04:29 AM


I m going to look at the saw tomorrow and hopefully pick it up, anything in particular I should look out for?

Mike

- Mbe5003

Just check the overall condition and functions of the saw (fence, handwheels). Stuff that might be sticky or loose can usually be adjusted. It’s always good to run it, but keep in mind that belts, pulleys, and bearings are all easy maintenance fixes if anything’s not perfect. With the saw unplugged spin the arbor by hand and listen if the bearings squeal or grind. Check inside for major cracks or damage to the trunnions and gears. You can check the top for flatness, but don’t get too anal about it…it’d take a big deviation to effect the cut, plus wing deviations can usually be shimmed to level. From the pic it looks good for it’s age….minor rust and grime mean next to nothing, because they’re normal and clean up pretty easily. Deep pitted rust can mean neglect and exposure to elements that it shouldn’t have seen.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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