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How to square up a zero clearence table saw insert?

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Forum topic by treesner posted 06-05-2016 03:02 AM 784 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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treesner

166 posts in 424 days


06-05-2016 03:02 AM

Hey guys I got this zero clearence insert for my dewalt 7491 for cutting plywood.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0000223V9/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_pt5uxb81SS8DE

Problem is it has a slight bow to it and with the little screws all the way backed out one side is taller than the table. Should I just hand this down so it’s lower and try to level with the screws? Not sure how to deal with the bow.

Also when squaring up my blade should I be going off the table or the insert? It seems like I’d want it square with the insert because on small pieces with a push stick they’ll run through only touching the insert


19 replies so far

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

880 posts in 1896 days


#1 posted 06-05-2016 03:21 AM

I’d send it back. For thirty bucks the darn thing should darn well be flat.

Square your blade to the table and your insert flush and flat to the table.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#2 posted 06-05-2016 04:13 AM

+1 muleskinner
In today’s market there is no reason to accept crappy products.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View treesner's profile

treesner

166 posts in 424 days


#3 posted 06-05-2016 04:30 AM


+1 muleskinner
In today s market there is no reason to accept crappy products.

- oldnovice

Know any better ones available?

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

976 posts in 912 days


#4 posted 06-05-2016 05:04 AM

They should install a hair low on the front and a hair high on the rear. This is so that there is no edge to catch as you feed. A little crown or cup only matters when doing dado’s that have to be at an ultra precise depth. Be sure that there is no sawdust in the support lip.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#5 posted 06-05-2016 04:14 PM

treesner, yup!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

686 posts in 847 days


#6 posted 06-05-2016 04:34 PM

It is pretty easy to make your own. If you have a pattern bit for your router, you can simply use double stick tape (adhesive on both sides) to attach plywood or MDF and make an exact duplicate.

Or you can just mark out the shape with a compass and ruler and cut out with jig saw, band or or scroll saw.

You can buy Leecraft BK-1 Blank Phenolic Sheet Leecraft uses directly from them to make your own. You can make 2 or 3 for about the price of one ready made one.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#7 posted 06-05-2016 07:14 PM

Lazyman, phenolic is definitely a good way to go!
Thank for the source of phenolic as my source dried up when the store closed.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View treesner's profile

treesner

166 posts in 424 days


#8 posted 06-06-2016 03:39 PM



It is pretty easy to make your own. If you have a pattern bit for your router, you can simply use double stick tape (adhesive on both sides) to attach plywood or MDF and make an exact duplicate. Or you can just mark out the shape with a compass and ruler and cut out with jig saw, band or or scroll saw.

You can buy Leecraft BK-1 Blank Phenolic Sheet Leecraft uses directly from them to make your own. You can make 2 or 3 for about the price of one ready made one.

- Lazyman

they wouldn’t have those adjustment screws though, do you just sand it down till its flush and square?

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

825 posts in 1189 days


#9 posted 06-06-2016 03:56 PM

It is pretty easy to make your own. If you have a pattern bit for your router, you can simply use double stick tape (adhesive on both sides) to attach plywood or MDF and make an exact duplicate.

Or you can just mark out the shape with a compass and ruler and cut out with jig saw, band or or scroll saw.

You can buy Leecraft BK-1 Blank Phenolic Sheet Leecraft uses directly from them to make your own. You can make 2 or 3 for about the price of one ready made one.

- Lazyman

they wouldn t have those adjustment screws though, do you just sand it down till its flush and square?

- treesner

At 1” thick, that’s a lot of sanding on an extreme health hazard. You could get a 1/2” x 5 X 5 Baltic Birch sheet for about $35 and make a lot more than 3…....... I use flat Phillips drawer guide screws. I think they’re 7/16 in length. Benn doing it that way since ‘78 with no ill effects…...... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#10 posted 06-06-2016 04:09 PM

I buy little Allen head set screws and drill undersized holes where necessary.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#11 posted 06-06-2016 04:26 PM

The phenolic in the link for the phenolic sheet and is indentified as 1/2” thick.
However, if you click on Leecraft you will see a number of available inserts.

There are thinner sheets available, cut to size, from “Interstate Plastic”: https://www.interstateplastics.com/mobi-plastic-sheets-details.php?sku=PHENC%20%20SH with options as to glass, fabric, or linen.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

686 posts in 847 days


#12 posted 06-06-2016 09:32 PM

In the spirit of full disclosure, I typically use birch plywood for TS inserts myself because it is cheaper and a little easier for me to machine. Note that my saw has the thin stamped steel type of insert so I have to drill and route a rabbet on the edges to get it to sit flush. If is a pain but much cheaper than the commercially available ZC inserts for my saw.

I mentioned the phenolic sheets 1) to compare the price with ready made one in the OP, 2) because they should be more stable and durable than the birch plywood which can shrink and swell a little if your location and shop has significant humidity swings from season to season and 3) because that is what the Leecraft insert in the OP is made from.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#13 posted 06-08-2016 03:29 PM

I make mine from 3/4” MDF with formica laminated on both sides. for the adjustment screws, just put some #6 countersunk head screws in the bottom.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#14 posted 06-08-2016 03:38 PM

Another good material I have used is 3/8” UHMW, Ultra High Molecular Weight, plastic.
It is easy to work and slippery like PTFE.

From Interstate Plastics
This Ultra High Molecular Weight (UHMW) Polyethylene sheet has exceptionally high abrasion and impact resistance properties. It will outwear all other materials, including metals, nylons, urethanes, and fluoroplastics. In corrosion resistance, it has the same qualities of other polyethylenes. The working temp range is from -60°F – 200°F. Because it resists wear, friction and corrosion, it cuts maintenance costs, energy consumption, and extends equipment life. Its properties include: low coefficient of friction, self-lubrication, non-adherent surface, FDA and USDA concurrence for contact with foods, drugs, etc. Use mechanical fasteners in construction.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

825 posts in 1189 days


#15 posted 06-08-2016 04:54 PM


The phenolic in the link for the phenolic sheet and is indentified as 1/2” thick.

However, if you click on Leecraft you will see a number of available inserts.

There are thinner sheets available, cut to size, from “Interstate Plastic”: https://www.interstateplastics.com/mobi-plastic-sheets-details.php?sku=PHENC%20%20SH with options as to glass, fabric, or linen.

- oldnovice

Ok, Novice, you got your info from the product description, and I got this from the Product Information. I should have noticed the weight is too light for a piece with those dimensions. It doesn’t change the fact he’s having a problem with the one he bought. .............. Jerry (in Tucson)

Part Number BK-1
Item Weight 1 pounds
Product Dimensions 11×15 x 1 inches
Item model number BK-1
Item Package Quantity 1
Batteries Included? No
Batteries Required? No

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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