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Forum topic by Eric_S posted 04-16-2010 09:11 PM 1019 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Eric_S

1521 posts in 1885 days


04-16-2010 09:11 PM

So I built a router table a few weeks back and utilized the router plate I bought a long time ago when I originally intended to built the table. I’m trying to figure out though if the plate is bad. I’ll try to take a pic of it this weekend (at work right now lol). The router plate inserts sit a little bit higher than the plate itself, and when I screwed the fixed base to the plate I noticed the plate has a little little bit of a cupping it seems. Did I waste money? Can this be fixed in anyway? Its a Rousseau plate.

Appened: It might help to note that I’ve never used a router table plate before and not sure if it should in fact be perfectly flat, but I would think you wouldn’t want the plate to sit lower than the table and the insert a little higher. Wouldn’t that make the depth change mid cut on short pieces?

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN


14 replies so far

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 2564 days


#1 posted 04-16-2010 09:22 PM

Eric – The throat inserts should be flush with the surface of the mounting plate. My throat inserts snap in – maybe you just need to push a little harder?

Heavier routers can cause lighter-weight plates to sag. Is that what you mean by cupping?

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2338 days


#2 posted 04-16-2010 09:26 PM

yes, the plate must be flat , otherwise you’ll be sacrificing precision and safety in which case – what’s the point of using a router table to begin with?

the inserts should sit flush , or lower than the plate so that you can shim them – but not higher.

as for the plate cupping – you can shim the router where it’s attached to the plate in order to fix the cupping. if you can post here in which direction and how much it’s cupping I can tell you which screws/bolts to shim.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Eric_S

1521 posts in 1885 days


#3 posted 04-16-2010 09:30 PM

Hey guys, the plate crowns downward so from the top of the table the center is higher than the sides. I just found out it’s supposed to be like this: http://www.rousseauco.com/model3509.htm “Molded With Slight Crown For Distortion Free Cuts” I’m confused, how does that create distortion free cuts. Also, the inserts are set all the way in, but still are a little higher than the table. I was thinking I could sand the insert rings a little bit, but the crowning on the plate is completely throwing me off.

Maybe its because I haven’t put the motor in yet, only the fixed base mount from the DeWalt 618 plunge/fix base kit. The motor might be heavy enough to flatten it, I’ll try that early tomorrow and let you know.

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2338 days


#4 posted 04-16-2010 09:37 PM

theres a big difference between molding something with a slight crown and cupping of the plate from bolting it to the base. from my experience if the cupping is the result of tightening the bolts to the router’s base you will not see it magically ‘fixed’ when putting in the motor as this is caused by either unflat plate, or some misalignment in the machining of the mounting holes in the plate and the only way to fix it is to shim 2 of the bolts (if you are mounting your base using 4 bolts)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Eric_S

1521 posts in 1885 days


#5 posted 04-16-2010 09:38 PM

Im not sure if its cupped from screwing on the base, or just that I didn’t notice it was actually crowned until after I screwed it on. Yes it is mounted using 4 screws. I may just buy a new one if its a lot of hassle. I’ll post pics of it this weekend. I’m guessing if its molded with a slight crown then the bottom side should still be perfectly flat. I’ll check that too.

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2338 days


#6 posted 04-16-2010 09:55 PM

yeah, check both sides with a straight edge prior to bolting the base to it. also place the plate on the table top without the base, and see if it’s all flush with the top. that would indicate if the cupping if caused by bolting the baser in – which is caused from the machining of the holes – this is normal, and can be easily addressed.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View MyFathersSon's profile

MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2003 days


#7 posted 04-16-2010 10:35 PM

I remember a thread just like this on another site a couple of years ago when i bought my first insert.
Conclusion there was just what you read—
That the ever so slightly convex top is an intentional design feature of the Rousseau plate intended to insure that your workpiece was resting solidly on the plate at the point the workpiece met the bit.
Whether this was a GOOD decision as opposed to a perfectly flat plate—was an issue they never came to agreement on.
The inserts not sitting flush with the top of the plate is a whole different issue. As another poster said – you may need to press them in a little tighter. If that still doesnt work – there may be a defect.

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.

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Eric_S

1521 posts in 1885 days


#8 posted 04-16-2010 10:54 PM

Thanks for the replies. I’m going to investigate it tomorrow and take some pics for you, so Watch this post if you want to see the pics.

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

View bigike's profile

bigike

4032 posts in 1978 days


#9 posted 04-17-2010 12:07 AM

I would just put a piece of ply for a new top and screw the router to that. this way it’s always flat no adjusting nothing.

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1521 posts in 1885 days


#10 posted 04-18-2010 08:11 PM

Ok, sorry there are no pics. My camera battery needs charging. Oh well. Its ok though because I think I’m just going to get a new router plate that is without a crown because its just throwing me off that it wouldn’t be flat which is what I’d prefer. bottom side though isn’t flat either which makes me think its a combination of the crowned top with actual cupping on the sides. I’m not sure though if I’ll just replace it with the table top material as a router plate or buy a new one.

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

671 posts in 1821 days


#11 posted 04-18-2010 10:15 PM

We had one of those plates at the last place I worked, and I’d never buy one for my personal use. Way too thin, Imo.

-- Gerry, http://g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

View MyFathersSon's profile

MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2003 days


#12 posted 04-19-2010 08:44 PM

Along with what Ike mentioned—there is the noise factor.
The first couple of tables I built I bolted the router directly to the underside of the top.
With my latest table – I decided to get with the program and use a plate.
It does make a lot of things easier———-
But the noise level almost doubled with the router vibration being amplified by the plate—rather than deadened by the top and the case.
Yes – I’m still using the plate—but I have added better ear protection.

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.

View REME's profile

REME

26 posts in 2003 days


#13 posted 04-19-2010 09:05 PM

The rousseau plates are engineered with a slight arc to them, the idea being when you attach a big router the weight will even it out. I bought this plate and returned it. The inserts didnt sit flush and the arc was a problem when doing cope and stick doors. I wound up buying rocklers plate. Its dead flat and thicker and it will not sag under the weight of a 3hp router.

-- - Mike

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1521 posts in 1885 days


#14 posted 04-19-2010 09:14 PM

Reme, I’m already looking at the rockler ones :)

MyFathersSon, you may try and see if Dynamat would work on the underside of the plate. Dynamat is sound dampening material I would use on car doors to dampen vibrations from speakers for car audio performance. You can probably get the same stuff under a cheaper generic name. Dynamat is sold at Best Buy and a lot of car audio stores or online.

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

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