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Is it me or my TS fence

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Forum topic by dalec posted 12-13-2007 03:13 AM 813 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dalec

613 posts in 2641 days


12-13-2007 03:13 AM

I was finally ready to start cutting boards for a small box project. I aligned my table saw,(saw and fence parallel to the miter slot and saw blade at 90 degrees to the table top).

I decided to go with a smaller box, so I would not have to resaw too tall a board (no band saw). I ripped the board into 2 narrower boards. then proceeded to resaw the narrow pieces into 3/8” boards.

I got on a roll sawing the boards. I should have checked the first board. Once I completed the cuts, I noticed the boards were slightly thicker at the bottom of the board than the top. Put a square to the fence and found the TS fence feed side top near the front side of the TS curves slightly away from the saw blade based on my square. I checked the square against the center of the fence and the outfeed side. These last two measures were pretty much dead on.

Now my question: I tend when using the fence (locked down) to put firm pressure downward and against the fence when using the fence as a guide. Is this technique of holding workpieces correct?

The Table Saw I have is a used saw and the original owner did not appear to taken care of the saw very well, so I am thinking he may have force the fence at one time so much so that the fence is slightly bent.

Is it me (my technique) or my fence? Got any thoughts on this? Open to suggestions.

Dalec


11 replies so far

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2774 days


#1 posted 12-13-2007 04:03 AM

I’ll bet the blade is off.
Do you have a Wixey guage or equal?
Do you have a machinists square?
Try googling the above and see what you come up with.

Cheers

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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dalec

613 posts in 2641 days


#2 posted 12-13-2007 04:28 AM

Hi Bob, I put the wixey on the blade and it was seesawing between 90.0 and 90.1 degrees to the table. I don’t have a machinists square. I used old Stanley wood square.

I just went to the shop and double checked the fence and found using a straight edge again the fence it appears to be flat, so I zeroed my wixey and placed it against three areas of the fence and had readings between 89.7 and 89.9. Is the .1 or .3 degree off 90 degrees enough to throw my cuts noticeably off?

Dalec

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Bob #2

3808 posts in 2774 days


#3 posted 12-13-2007 04:45 AM

I don’t know how that’s possible. If your blade is _+ 90° and your fence is 90° then the only thing left is you.

Check to see if youare man handling the cut as it goes past the blade.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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dalec

613 posts in 2641 days


#4 posted 12-13-2007 05:39 AM

Bob, It could be. I am thinking as the wood goes by the blade, I have to shift my stance and I may be likely changing my hold on the board and thus shifting the orientation of the board to the blade and fence. I will pay attention to this when I make my cuts in the future.

Thanks for your ideas.

Dalec

View Hawgnutz's profile

Hawgnutz

526 posts in 2829 days


#5 posted 12-13-2007 06:00 AM

Hey, try this. See if you can measure the difference between the bottom and top widths. Then attach a “sacrificial” fence to your fence. (A sacrificialfence is nothing more than a straight piece of wood that is attached to the fence by clamps or screws/bolts.) then use shims (playing cards work well) to shim the top to match the bottom according toyour previous measurements.

A set of machinist’s squares are almost a necessity if you want good setups of your machinery. Especially if you buy them used! You can find a set from Woodcraft for around 20 or 30 dollars. It is money well spent! You can even find them at Harbor Freight if you cannot afford Woodcraft, but you will wish you had bought them at Woodcraft after awhile. Buy the best tools you can afford! But it is best to buy a set of machinist’s squares real soon to check your fences, blades, and wood. You won’t be sorry!

God Bless,
Hawg

-- Saving barnwood from the scrapyards

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dalec

613 posts in 2641 days


#6 posted 12-13-2007 06:18 AM

Thanks Hawg,

I appreciate all the advice I get from LJs. Trying to learn to work with wood is made easier when I know I can get support from follow LJs. It would be down right discouraging if I have to do it alone.

Dalec

View schwingding's profile

schwingding

122 posts in 2578 days


#7 posted 12-17-2007 05:39 PM

Couple of thoughts. You could be moving the fence slightly as you feed the workpiece angling it in towards the back of the blade. Check to make sure the fence is immovable.

I set my fence to be .003” further from the back of the blade than the front. That keeps the trailing blade away from the workpiece that has already been cut by the front instead of wandering into it. It also puts any burn marks on the waste piece.

Next, consider a splitter insert behind the blade such as the MJ splitter. I put mine in so it keeps the saved piece tight against the fence after it passes the blade. Makes up for my poor technique and my rips are way better than before.

-- Just another woodworker

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dalec

613 posts in 2641 days


#8 posted 12-17-2007 06:24 PM

Schwinging,

I had to take the saw guard off both to resaw but with the cutting getting pretty thin, the guard was preventing the fence from getting close enough to the work to act as a guide.

I have not researched after market splitter for the bosch 4000 or if there is such a thing. Does anyone out there know of something that might work?

Dalec

View Blake's profile

Blake

3439 posts in 2627 days


#9 posted 12-17-2007 06:56 PM

Is it you or is it your fence? ...probably both. If the saw is misaligned only a tiny bit you will notice it in the work. But even after perfect resawing you should expect to plane the workpieces (either by machine or by hand) most of the time to make sure they are flat and even.

-- Happy woodworking! http://www.openarmsphotography.com

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schwingding

122 posts in 2578 days


#10 posted 12-17-2007 07:21 PM

Dale, search for the “MJ splitter”. It is what I use. Available from Lee Valley as well as other places. You could make your own as well after looking at the splitter. Oh heck, here it is. http://www.microjig.com/MJ%20Splitter.htm

-- Just another woodworker

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dalec

613 posts in 2641 days


#11 posted 12-18-2007 01:06 AM

Thanks Blake, the more I learn about woodworking the more I learn I don’t know and have to learn and of course how a particular tool would take care of just that process. $$$$$$

Schwingding,

I have a zero clearance insert from Bosch. Running the blade up to full height, it cut completely through the back portion of the insert. So the only way it would really work with the factory ZCI is to limit the height I can used the blade with the ZCI so I can retain the integrity of the insert and still allow me space to mount the MJ splitter. I may have to fabricate my own ZCI. Any advice in this area?

Dalec

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