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drill press: floor vs. bench

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Forum topic by leftcoaster posted 06-02-2016 02:52 PM 515 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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leftcoaster

82 posts in 341 days


06-02-2016 02:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: space efficiency drill press cart floor benchtop

From a space efficiency perspective, is there a big difference between:

1) a bench top drill press with a dedicated shop cart; and
2) a floor drill press on casters

?

Unless I were willing to give up precious bench space to a drill press, it seems like I’d have to build a cart for it, and I’m skeptical that I could make one that would be smaller than a floor model.

A third possibility is constructing a flip top cart that the drill press can share with another tool (thickness planer), but 180 pounds is asking a lot of a flip top cart and it’s operator. Also the height of a drill press would require a very tall cart.

I’d be grateful for some advice.

Thanks


16 replies so far

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 341 days


#1 posted 06-02-2016 02:54 PM

A fourth option is building a vertical cabinet to store the planer and press vertically on shelves that travel with the tools to the bench when needed.

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BurlyBob

3688 posts in 1730 days


#2 posted 06-02-2016 02:58 PM

I’m really enjoying my Porter Cable floor model. It’s parked in a small corner near my work table within easy reach to lay anything on after drilling. I haven’t seen a need to move it yet. I kicked around the idea of casters, but so far I’ve no reason for them or need to move the drill press. Maybe you too can find a small corner for a drill press.

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Notw

471 posts in 1218 days


#3 posted 06-02-2016 02:59 PM

I have a benchtop Delta drill press and so far have not found a need for anything larger. I also built a cart that holds it, my benchtop bandsaw and has some drawers for storage.

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 341 days


#4 posted 06-02-2016 03:13 PM

@BurlyBob, can you give me a sense of the required footprint (or the model #) ?

@Notw, is the press a 12” model or smaller? What’s the size of the bandsaw, also on my list…

Thanks guys

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2532 days


#5 posted 06-02-2016 03:22 PM

I’d say depends on what you want to do with it. I have found personally (and i started with a bench top) that I prefer the floor model myself but I get into situations where the short quil travel and distance I need just does not lend itself to a bench top. Seen some nifty benchtop setups though.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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teejk02

424 posts in 590 days


#6 posted 06-02-2016 03:22 PM

The floor models don’t occupy much room. I would NOT put one on casters though. They are extremely top heavy (“tippy”). When I have seen the need to move mine around the shop I tip it just enough to get a sheet of cardboard under it and drag it. I think many manufacturers specify that they need to be anchored to the floor…I didn’t.

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Notw

471 posts in 1218 days


#7 posted 06-02-2016 03:31 PM

Here is the cart and the bandsaw it is a craftsman 10” and now instead of the scroll saw there is a 12” Delta drill press
Click for details

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BurlyBob

3688 posts in 1730 days


#8 posted 06-02-2016 03:38 PM

Lefty, it’s that Porter cable 660 drill press. I’m going to take a shot and say that the total acreage is less that 2 feet, that’s to include the pulley system at the top. The base is maybe 16” front to rear and 12” side to side. There are several reviews about it here on Lumber Jocks. The big factor for me was cost vs. capabilities. So far I’m well satisfied with it.

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PaulHWood

337 posts in 1717 days


#9 posted 06-02-2016 03:40 PM

Started with a delta benchtop with a cheap table. It was better than not having one and the adjustable speeds makes for better drilling. Before building a cart, i decided to go with a floor model.

Get a Jet 17 floor model cheap that is missing some pieces (depth stop and the like), but it has many more speeds, and has more power. I have not put a table on it or casters yet because I am looking to upgrade again to either a newer jet or a grizzly (grizzly’s parts are typically half the price of jets).

As for space, the floor model seems to take up less space and is more versatile.

I have found that if a tool is not easily accessible, I tend to use something else.

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 341 days


#10 posted 06-02-2016 04:14 PM

@NotW – that’s a nice build. Do you still have the SKetchUp? I like how you were able to use the height difference of the two tools’ working surfaces to get them next to one another.

Thanks to all of you guys—clearly I have to give this some more thought. I have various reasons for wanting a drill press but the main one is hogging out mortises as I think it would be easier than with a plunge router or on the router table. My “shop” is really more of a storage shed and I have to pull everything outside to use it. I could dedicate a small area to a floor press if it were a model with casters. Same with a bandsaw. But the table saw, router, and planer are outdoors only.

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teejk02

424 posts in 590 days


#11 posted 06-02-2016 07:16 PM



@NotW – that s a nice build. Do you still have the SKetchUp? I like how you were able to use the height difference of the two tools working surfaces to get them next to one another.

Thanks to all of you guys—clearly I have to give this some more thought. I have various reasons for wanting a drill press but the main one is hogging out mortises as I think it would be easier than with a plunge router or on the router table. My “shop” is really more of a storage shed and I have to pull everything outside to use it. I could dedicate a small area to a floor press if it were a model with casters. Same with a bandsaw. But the table saw, router, and planer are outdoors only.

- leftcoaster

If mortising is your primary goal then you might want to look at one of the dedicated machines. I tried the DP version years ago and didn’t like it #1 there is more flex in a DP down-travel than one realizes #2 the set-up time is not quick and so many times the same project required the DP to be used as a DP. I bought the dedicated Delta several years ago for maybe $300 and it came with 4 bit sets. It doesn’t get used a lot but no regrets. My DP is free to use as a DP which is a lot (metal work, small drum sanding, etc.).

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clin

514 posts in 461 days


#12 posted 06-02-2016 08:20 PM

I have a floor drill press, only because it was used and cheap. I think I would probably have a bench top one and build a custom cabinet to sit it on if I didn’t already have the floor press. At least that way, you get some usable storage space below the table.

The only reason I would choose a floor press instead of a bench top one is if I knew I needed the additional clearance. And that clearance (at least on mine is not as much as you might think).

In fact just yesterday, I had the first opportunity in years, to use that clearance, lowered the table just to find out it was little more than 2’, with about another 2’ still below the top. That 2’ isn’t enough for what I need to do. So I’m back to using a guide block and hand drill. And yes, I could swing the top out of the way and rig up some other support for the work to get the clearance,. But this task isn’t worth the effort.

Point is, there is always going to be something too tall to fit under the press. I’d think about what you want to do and have done in the past. Let that guide your decision.

-- Clin

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2708 days


#13 posted 06-02-2016 08:43 PM

A bench model DP, unless it is on it’s own bench, will spew wood/metal shavings unto any work/ tools on the same bench; a mess to clean up. A floor model DP is out of the way until needed and can be moved around to suit what you are drilling. Imagine having to drill/bore holes on the end of something that is 3, 4 or more feet long. The only reason not to have a floor model DP is if you have no free floor space.

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brtech

903 posts in 2387 days


#14 posted 06-02-2016 09:16 PM

To me, it’s the quill travel and the depth that is the difference, and not the floor space, or speeds. I have a decent Griz benchtop, and it’s served me well, but I really covet a decent floor model for the travel and depth it would give me.

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Kirk650

294 posts in 213 days


#15 posted 06-02-2016 09:29 PM

I built a rolling table for a desktop drill press, spindle sander, and disk sander. Scroll saw is on a lower shelf. I planned to eventually buy a floor standing drill press, but the years pass, and I haven’t done so.

I’d still like a bigger stronger drill press, but I guess I don’t really need one.

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