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General purpose blade for SawStop

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Forum topic by DBordello posted 06-01-2016 09:06 PM 520 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DBordello

132 posts in 694 days


06-01-2016 09:06 PM

Hello All,

I had noticed my Forrest Woodworker II had not been cutting well, and was about 0.004 from flat. Therefore, I decided to put an Infinity 50T Combination Blade (Thin-Kerf) on my Sawstop. After some adjustements, it is cutting like a dream.

However, today I saw a post of someone who tripped the break, with a similar blade, and the break skipped a few teeth. Although I had noticed the warning against depth-limiting shoulders during installation, I didn’t know what those were and moved on. That being said, the Infinity does have depth limiting shoulders, and now I am in the market for a new blade.

While I realize there are N+1 threads on table saw blades, I thought eliminating those with depth-limiting shoulders from the discussion would be interesting.

What do people like on their saws for general purpose? I mostly do ripping, but occasionally make a cross-cut.

(I certainly hope KnottScott can jump in).


14 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#1 posted 06-01-2016 09:27 PM

It’s too bad the Combomax has shoulders….great all around blade. For mostly ripping and an occasional crosscut from one blade, I really like the 30T WWII….it rips more efficiently than a 40T or 50T blade, still leaves a surprisingly clean edge, and can crosscut acceptably well in many situations. For fine crosscuts and ply, you’ll still want a good 60T to 80T purebred blade like the Infinity 010-060 or 010-080, Freud LU79/LU80 or LU85, etc.

Infinity also makes the Super General Hi-ATB 40T. It’s among the cleanest cutting 40T blades out there if the saw is set up well and the stock is flat and straight. It doesn’t have shoulders, but I’d consider it’s strengths to be more crosscutting, ply, and thinner ripping oriented.

For value, it’s tough to beat the Delta Industrial 35-7657 40T ATB. Large C-4 micrograin carbide, heavy plate, precision made in the US, and a well proven standard ATB general purpose design.

The 40T Ridge Carbide TS2000 and Tenryu Gold Medal are always contenders in this category.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#2 posted 06-01-2016 10:50 PM

p.s.: There are some 50T combo blades that don’t have the anti-kickback shoulders. The Amana Tool 610504 has massive teeth and cuts pretty well. I found that it had slightly more pronounced swirl marks along the edge of the cut than a blade as good as the Combomax, but most do, and it still gives a glue ready edge. ($60 from Amazon) It’s full kerf, so if you prefer TK look to the Amana AGE line.

The Tenryu RS25550 is also a 50T ATB/R combo blade that doesn’t have the shoulders. It’s also full kerf, is also very good, but is also not quite as good as your Combomax, in my experience.

I can’t be sure, but the DeWalt DW71050R looks like the former series 60 DW7640 50T ATB/R, which was actually quite good. I still have and use one….of the 7 or 8 50T ATB/R blades I’ve used and tested, this one was second only to the Combomax. (My Combomax landed in a friend’s shop a few years ago…he loved it, and wouldn’t give it back to me!)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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jacquesr

339 posts in 891 days


#3 posted 06-01-2016 10:50 PM

Ridge Carbide. +1

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 694 days


#4 posted 06-01-2016 10:52 PM

For some reason, I am drawn to the Super General. In general, I would probably say I do an even mixture of ripping, cross cutting, and plywood (mostly plywood). It does not appear to have the depth-limiting shoulders.

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1472 posts in 2711 days


#5 posted 06-01-2016 11:03 PM

You know, those depth limiting shoulders just lengthen the time the blade stops when digging into the aluminium. It has nothing to do with how quickly the blades stop into the saw, it is still milliseconds. You are still going to keep your fingers and have almost no injury to yourself if you make contact.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 694 days


#6 posted 06-01-2016 11:12 PM

I believe the force from the blade stopping is what causes the blade to retract. Therefore, if the break can’t get a grip, that certainly doesn’t help.

In any case, I would rather have the proper blade.

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waho6o9

7180 posts in 2045 days


#7 posted 06-01-2016 11:13 PM

View clin's profile

clin

514 posts in 464 days


#8 posted 06-01-2016 11:21 PM

I have a SawStop and just bought a Freud glue-line rip blade. Didn’t know it had those shoulders until I received it. I realize SawStop doesn’t recommend blades with shoulders. But is it just a matter of the blade takes 20 deg of rotation to stop instead of 10 deg.

I.E., I get a small cut instead of just a nick?

-- Clin

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DBordello

132 posts in 694 days


#9 posted 06-01-2016 11:24 PM

I am not sure what the consequences are. However, it looks like the brake “skipped” a good length before grabbing:

I also wouldn’t want to guess where those teeth are :)

View RibsBrisket4me's profile

RibsBrisket4me

1526 posts in 1973 days


#10 posted 06-01-2016 11:32 PM

Wow, that pic is sobering.

Like knotscott, I also use. 30T WW-2 quite a bit. I echo all of his comments about that blade.

I also like the old Freud LU86 combo blade. At times you can get those for under $40!

I have dedicated ripping and crosscut blades, but really 99% of the time the WW-2 or the Freud are on my saw.

the ww-2 does not have shoulders but the Freud does have some gullets, does not matter to me though, cuz my saw is an old Craftsman 

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#11 posted 06-02-2016 11:12 AM


For some reason, I am drawn to the Super General. In general, I would probably say I do an even mixture of ripping, cross cutting, and plywood (mostly plywood). It does not appear to have the depth-limiting shoulders.

- DBordello

I love the Super General. It can really be an amazing blade…I can recognize boards cut by the SG by the shine it leaves! The teeth are massive, and it’s a cool looking extremely well manufactured blade. The 30° top bevel makes it really good at fine crosscuts and ply too. There’s never a free lunch though….it’s fussier about setup, and due to the very tight side clearances and dual side grind, the same characteristics that leave a polished edge can also make it more prone to burning if everything isn’t just right. It’s best if the boards are jointed and planed (flat and straight), and the saw’s setup is spot on. It’s also not great in thicker ripping. You seem pretty articulate from your posts, so if you’re meticulous about your setup, technique, and mill your wood before you cut, it really can be an impressive blade. I find it does best with a slightly higher blade height setting than some blades. It’s just not in the “set it and forget it” camp that the Combomax is in. Keep it clean, keep it sharp, and it’ll wow you.



-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2229 days


#12 posted 06-02-2016 01:51 PM

I am sure few people believe me, but I have 60 years of woodworking under my belt so I am no beginner. My saw is a Hammer K3 12” sliding table saw and the blade I swear by for general cutting is a Harbor Freight 12” 96 tooth blade (http://www.harborfreight.com/12-inch-96-tooth-alternate-top-bevel-crosscut-blade-46235.html). As the Hammer has a European size arbor hole and two locator pin holes to keep the blade from unscrewing when the electronic brake is energized when stopping, I had to send the blade off to Forrest Blades to have the arbor hole enlarged and the locator pin holes punched. Still, it cost me about half than most top end blades.

What I love about this blade is its relatively narrow kerf and the glass smooth cut it makes. The blade runs absolutely true also. In all, it is the best blade I have ever had in my 60 years of woodworking!!! You Saw Stop guys should like it even more as should you trigger the blade stop the blade is much less expensive to replace.

Anyway, that’s my two cents.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Julian's profile

Julian

1040 posts in 2158 days


#13 posted 06-02-2016 02:11 PM

I use a Forrest WWII thin kerf blade. Have used it for about 14 years and have not found a better combination blade. I have tried other blades (Frued & Guhdo), which both are very good but the WWII is just a little better for me. That’s my $.02.

-- Julian

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 694 days


#14 posted 06-02-2016 02:41 PM


For some reason, I am drawn to the Super General. In general, I would probably say I do an even mixture of ripping, cross cutting, and plywood (mostly plywood). It does not appear to have the depth-limiting shoulders.

- DBordello

I love the Super General. It can really be an amazing blade…I can recognize boards cut by the SG by the shine it leaves! The teeth are massive, and it s a cool looking extremely well manufactured blade. The 30° top bevel makes it really good at fine crosscuts and ply too. There s never a free lunch though….it s fussier about setup, and due to the very tight side clearances and dual side grind, the same characteristics that leave a polished edge can also make it more prone to burning if everything isn t just right. It s best if the boards are jointed and planed (flat and straight), and the saw s setup is spot on. It s also not great in thicker ripping. You seem pretty articulate from your posts, so if you re meticulous about your setup, technique, and mill your wood before you cut, it really can be an impressive blade. I find it does best with a slightly higher blade height setting than some blades. It s just not in the “set it and forget it” camp that the Combomax is in. Keep it clean, keep it sharp, and it ll wow you.

- knotscott

My current struggle is with jointing/planing/squaring boards. Although I try, I am not 100% convinced my saw is as dialed in as it could be (more tools on the way to help calibrating other tools). Therefore, your post has convinced me the Super General is not for me. To be honest, I want something I can throw on the saw, and somewhat forget about.

Back to thinking the WWII 30T is the correct blade for me.

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