LumberJocks

Porta Wrap Pro - What is this?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by daltxguy posted 04-15-2010 09:16 AM 4748 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 3379 days


04-15-2010 09:16 AM

Topic tags/keywords: forestry tool

Listed under forestry in our local (New Zealand) online trading site here

Described as follows:

professional porta wrap
a must tool for dropping branches an chog [sic] from trees safely
all stainless construction with 3 inch tube

Does anyone know what this is, how it is used and why I would need/want one?

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!


6 replies so far

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 3379 days


#1 posted 04-15-2010 12:55 PM

Thanks Dave, you’re absolutely right. We’ve entered the interesting world of the arborist! and if I believe what I read, there seems to be a lot of innovation in this field.
I love that this is just a clever rigging device which works on friction and gravity. I found a source for it here in NZ @ a company called treetools

The website comes with a pdf instruction booklet

Here is their description:

“Used for lowering heavy branches or logs, the stainless Port-a-Wrap III is a friction device that enables a single person to control loads many times their own weight. By taking wraps with the rigging line around the Port-a-Wrap, friction is applied to the rope; the more wraps taken, the more friction applied. Compared to the traditional method of taking wraps around the trunk of the tree, the Port-a-Wrap provides more consistent friction that doesn’t vary from one tree to the next, can be tied off to allow the worker to let go and walk away from the rope, can be combined with a fiddle block to hoist branches, and does not damage the tree.”

Oh, dear, what’s a fiddle block…

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 3379 days


#2 posted 04-15-2010 01:02 PM

I like how Petzl’s version is called the TUBA. I can totally relate. I used to play the tuba in high school and I think this would be a better use for it…

I’ve entered a parallel universe.

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 3379 days


#3 posted 04-15-2010 01:25 PM

Of course a video is never too far away these days. I guess rigging for forestry probably has its roots in rigging sailing vessels.

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3764 days


#4 posted 04-15-2010 02:17 PM

This works on the same principal as a capstan winch except the drum isn’t spinning.

I worked on mineral exploration drills, & the capstan was used on a drive hammer for

pounding down casings.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Craig Ambrose's profile

Craig Ambrose

47 posts in 3037 days


#5 posted 04-15-2010 10:58 PM

On the topic of fun tree felling tools, here’s another one that probably everyone but me already knew about:

(I’m referring to the Cant Hook, not the horses)

Cant Hook

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 3379 days


#6 posted 04-16-2010 05:57 AM

Dick – thanks for that – so that’s how a capstan winch works!

Craig – Cant hooks are really useful ( so would horses). I personally prefer the peavey, which is the same idea but it has a pointy end which prevents damage to the log ( not a huge issue when the bark is on, but when log building, the log is usually peeled)

I’m partial to the peavey partly because I already have one which I built myself:
Click for details

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com