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Cutting circles on router table

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Forum topic by niki posted 12-12-2007 11:08 PM 3196 views 2 times favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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niki

426 posts in 2827 days


12-12-2007 11:08 PM

Good day everybody…long time no see…(or long time no jig…)

I had to cut 110 mm (4-5/16”) diameter circles to plug some holes.
I don’t have trammel because I almost did not have the need to cut circles.

I used 6 mm (1/4”) bit and using the router lift, I lifted the bit till I heard the first “ZZZZeeeeeee” (you know what I mean) and turned the board one round…turned the lift 2 rounds and the board one round and so on…

Regards
niki

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39 replies so far

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2686 days


#1 posted 12-12-2007 11:36 PM

Niki, I am continually impressed by your ingenuity. You regularly devise ways of doing things and after I’ve seen them they seem so straightforward, and still something I wouldn’t think of. Count me as one of your fans.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

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TomFran

2942 posts in 2742 days


#2 posted 12-12-2007 11:50 PM

Very cool, Niki! I love all those improvised clamps too. You are the great improviser!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

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niki

426 posts in 2827 days


#3 posted 12-13-2007 12:49 AM

Thank you so much

Russel
That’s what happens when I don’t have a trammel but, even if I had, I feel better and safer to turn the board instead of turning around and around the board…

I’m planning now something with fixed pivot that I can move to any distance on the router table to get any circle diameter….up to some limit of course…

Tom
Those clamps are not “improvisation” :-) I use them any time I need good grip….I posted them somewhere…

Regards
niki

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brunob

2277 posts in 2917 days


#4 posted 12-13-2007 01:09 AM

You’ve made so many neat jigs, you aught to write a book.

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2769 days


#5 posted 12-13-2007 01:12 AM

Why don’t you just make a trammel ?
You are drilling holes in your table for this , am I right?
Also in your material in several spots?

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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niki

426 posts in 2827 days


#6 posted 12-13-2007 01:28 AM

Thank you so much

Bruce
If I’ll sit down to write a book, I’ll not have time to make jigs and work in the garage….that is much more interesting than writing a book…

Bob
Till a few days ago, I did not need a trammel for my works.
I’m not drilling any holes on the router table and even the new design that I’m planning will be held with clamps to the table.

Usually, I’m using materials that cannot be used for any furniture and normally, they are left overs of Melamine and I have many of them…the one that you see on the pics was used before as a small working table…

Regards
niki

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Bob #2

3808 posts in 2769 days


#7 posted 12-13-2007 01:56 AM

Nicki I am confused. I see a screw in the part and it looks like it is screwed to the table top?
Help me out here.
Is that big chunk of melamine and those four big clamps fitted on top of your router table?
No wonder the bit can’t reach the parts.
You should make a trammel.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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niki

426 posts in 2827 days


#8 posted 12-13-2007 12:42 PM

Hi Bob

The workpiece is held to the Melamine board with a screw and boes not penetrate into the router table itself.

You are correct that the Melamine board is thick (3/4”) but the reason that the bit did not reach all the way through the workpiece was my fault…I left the depth stop locked (from previous job)....I used long bit (2”) that could easily go all the way up but…well, we all have our mistakes….

I’m planning to use 8mm (5/16”) so I shall get extra 3/8” depth.

I don’t have much of a need to cut circles but I think that with trammel I shall need also a backing board under the workpiece (held firmly to the workbench) and a carpet tape to hold the workpiece to the backer board…in my opinion, my set-up it much simpler but, it’s just me…

Regards
niki

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2769 days


#9 posted 12-13-2007 02:28 PM

Hi Nicki
I would also like to point out that using a 6 mm (1/4’) router bit that is 2” long is not only really tough on the router and collet but will likely prematurely ruin the bearings.

Secondly,from safety point of view the smaller diameter cutters have a tendency to work loose in most collets and even more so if they are extended bits as you have used.

It appears the your router table is about 1/2” thick, the melamine sheet is 3/4’ thick and the circle material is 3/4” thick. That makes it about 2 full inches of extension of the bit outside the router collet.

For my tastes and working technique that is not a safe set up.

I mention this because we have a number of people here just learning about woodworking machines and I would hate to see them counciled into a disaster or worse a personal injury.

I firmly believe that the trammel setup is a far safer approach than what you have shown us here.
I grant that you will have to use a nonslip surface to router against but they are only a few dollars a meter at most tool stores.
Also flipping the board overhalf way through to prevent scoring the under pad.
I note you had to do this with your set up because the bit would not reach though all the material.

Regards
Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2827 days


#10 posted 12-13-2007 05:29 PM

Hi Bob

You are correct that 1/4” shank – 2” long is tough on the router and even dangerous because it can break at high loads and I would not suggest a beginner to use them but…

All the “kuntz” (German – trick) is in the way that I use it…because the router lift is outside of the table area, as you can see, I’m lifting the bit by something like 1/16” increment at every round of the workpiece and it’s very easy on the router and the bit (I can hear when it’s tough on them) and, I don’t have to stop to re-adjust the bit height.

I know that not many people are “excited” from this router lift (only a few people on other forums asked me for more detailed information) but this primitive, $1 router lift is a “gold” for me and serves me much better than a $200~$300 lift would do…even for mortising with 3/4” dia (20 mm) bit, it cuts very easy because of the small increments.

My router table is 1¼” thick and is covered with 5/16” “floor panels”
The router is connected directly to the floor panels and because I removed the router base, I lost only 5/32” (4 mm) from the maximum bit height (or depth)

I have a few long bits (already 10 years) and they are reserved for jointing, doweling and sometimes mortising.
Even when I’m jointing, I don’t “bite” more than 0.5 mm (0.02”) in one pass not to stress the long bit.

By the way, before, I was cutting occasional circles of 24” dia on the table saw (pic below)

Regards
niki

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Bob #2

3808 posts in 2769 days


#11 posted 12-13-2007 08:13 PM

Thank you Nicki
I am no stranger to routers and must admit, at this time, I do not use a lift on my table.
I have several other methods at my disposal that help make woodworking safe efficient and enjoyable.

Cheers Bob

Here’s a two piece top tramelled and then shaped with a pattern the rest is just lathe work.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2784 days


#12 posted 12-13-2007 08:34 PM

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2827 days


#13 posted 12-13-2007 08:41 PM

Wow Bob
This one is “out of my range”....beautiful

Well, of course everybody has a little bit different methods because we are not “Windows XP” that will work the same way all over the world…

Even in a small group of people you can see the differences because everybody has a little bit different opinion, abilities, capabilities and skills and I think that everybody is correct in his way….

Do you remember the Grrriper post. I would not touch it but, many others (I think that everybody except me) where singing “Hallelujah” to this “Safety device” (not legal in EU)...on the other hand, I will not work on the Table saw without riving knife and guard while many people even does not remember where they put it (still packed it the plastic bag)...everybody is correct with his way…as long as no accidents…

Tom (mot)
So correct….

Best regards
niki

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2769 days


#14 posted 12-14-2007 07:06 PM

Nicki: Just for the record , I wonder if you could point me to the European regulation that bans the Grr-ripper.

I see it advertised over there so now I am a bit confused with your information below:

Do you remember the Grrriper post. I would not touch it but, many others (I think that everybody except me) where singing “Hallelujah” to this “Safety device” (not legal in EU)

http://www.capellemanmachines.be/grr_ripper_veiligheids_duwstuk.htm

Cheers

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2827 days


#15 posted 12-14-2007 10:08 PM

Hi Bob

Oh yes, they sell it also in UK…it’s a free country (or countries) and you can buy everything here (btw, in UK they advertise it as a “router table push block” but, everybody knows the real purpose)

Of course you cannot control amateurs (like in USA) but for registered business the regulation states “Blade guard MUST be installed for ANY operation on the table saw” (as I remember the same OSHA regulation applies in USA) and if an inspector will come and find that somebody is operating the table saw without a guard…or in case of an accident, the guard was not installed…this guy will be in deep….trouble.

Please have a look at this site (it’s a 260kb PDF file) and you will see a few interesting things about the EU safety regulations that because of them also the amateurs are getting better and safer machines.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/wis16.pdf

Regards
niki

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