LumberJocks

Blade selection for a G0771

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by jacobem3 posted 05-31-2016 02:53 AM 392 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View jacobem3's profile

jacobem3

30 posts in 921 days


05-31-2016 02:53 AM

I just assembled my new Grizzly G0771 and I’m a little confused trying to figure out which blade(s) to buy for it. My near term projects will involve cutting 3/4” plywood for cabinets/boxes and ripping dimensional lumber for some mobile bases. I’ll also cut some MDF to make a crosscut sled (need to make a zero clearance insert too).

The G0771 is a 2HP saw and it’s pretty dialed in from the factory (blade aligned to the miter slots within 0.001” and keeps that alignment when raising and lowering the blade) and the fence locks securely and consistently. The arbor has no measurable run out.

After doing some reading I’m leaning toward getting a couple blades rather than one general purpose blade – one high tooth count blade for plywood and crosscuts and another lower tooth blade for rips.

The vast majority of my cuts will only be 3/4” to 1.5” deep. Would it make sense to get smaller 7” circular saw blades? It seems like I could save quite a bit of money with 7” blades (plywood, rip, crosscut, etc.) for the cost of a single 10” general purpose blade (like a Forrest or the Freud Premier Fusion).

I’m new to woodworking, this is my first table saw and I’m sure I’ll make a number of mistakes along the way… it’s a hobby and a learning process for me.

Here are a few selections I’m considering. I’m not sure where the sweet spot is for value. Any feedback, recommendations, insight etc. is appreciated.

These are all Amazon prices, current as of 5/2016…

Option 1, general purpose:
Freud P410 Premier Fusion 10-Inch 40 Tooth Hi-ATB General Purpose, $77

Option 2, high end general purpose:
Forrest WW10307125 Woodworker II 10-Inch, 30 Tooth, $96

Option 2, 10” specialty blades ($140)
Freud LM74R010 10-Inch 30 Tooth TCG Glue Line Rip, $63
Freud LU80R010 10-Inch 80 Tooth Hi-ATB Ultimate Plywood, $73

Option 3, cheaper 10” specialty blades ($65)
Freud D1024X Diablo 10-Inch 24-Tooth ATB Rip, $28
Freud D1040X Diablo 10-Inch 40-Tooth ATB General Purpose, $35

Option 4, super cheap, 7” blades ($23)
Freud D0740A Diablo 7-1/4 40 Tooth ATB Finishing (for plywood & crosscuts), $14
Freud D0724A Diablo 7-1/4-Inch 24 Tooth ATB Framing (for ripping), $9

I do plan to get a dado stack because I think box joints look like fun, but I haven’t done any dado research yet.

Thanks!
Jacob


10 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#1 posted 05-31-2016 03:02 AM

First if it is a 10 inch blade saw buy 10 inch blades. 2nd if you are looking on Amazon at Freud blades on the blade they rate in a bar graph hoe good they are at a specific purpose look at that or go to there web site and do the same. I looked at there general purpose blade and it was only fair for rib and cross cutting but there 30 tooth rib blade was excellent for ripping and fair for cross cutting, which I found to be true. They also rate them for composites, MDF ect. I think you only need 2, Like I said I am a Freud man. Get a rip blade and a cross cut blade, I am also a thin kerf man, my saws are 1hp and have had great results with them.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#2 posted 05-31-2016 03:14 AM

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#3 posted 05-31-2016 03:27 AM

People here, cant even do there there own home work on the net, it just baffles me. Or do they just need some one to hold there hand, then call mommy!!!!!!!!

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View jacobem3's profile

jacobem3

30 posts in 921 days


#4 posted 05-31-2016 03:45 AM



People here, cant even do there there own home work on the net, it just baffles me. Or do they just need some one to hold there hand, then call mommy!!!!!!!!

- conifur

Your spelling baffles me.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6578 posts in 1618 days


#5 posted 05-31-2016 04:12 AM

Just buy 2 10” full kerf blades. A 60T crosscut blade and a 24T ripping blade is a good combo and what I use. If you buy the ripping blade in a FTG (flat top grind) then you get flat bottoms for cutting joinery.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7180 posts in 2044 days


#6 posted 05-31-2016 04:15 AM

View knotscott's profile (online now)

knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#7 posted 05-31-2016 09:30 AM

Your saw will have an easier time with a good 3/32” thin kerf blade (full kerf is 33% wider and requires more power for the same cut). 7-1/4” blades will leave too narrow of a kerf for your splitter, so wood will bind unless you remove the splitter (not recommended).....you just spent a good chunk of change on your saw, buy a couple of good blades suited for the task to optimize what it can do. Ultimately 3 blades is ideal (24T, 40/50T, 80T), but I understand that costs can get pretty high. The 30T GLR blades (LM74) leave a clean edge, but don’t satisfy the need for a bulk rip blade in thicker material, so that’s an easy one to eliminate IMO….many other blades that are more versatile can cover the same tasks.

Option 1: For ply and fine crosscuts, you can’t do better than a high tooth count blade with a Hi -ATB grind….for you what you describe, I like the 60T Infinity 010-060 ($70)...one of my all time favories. Not only will it be great for ply and fine crosscuts, but can give a comparably clean rip cut as a 30T GLR in materials up to an inch or so. Then you can add a decent 24T ripper like the LU87 or Infinity 010-124. (Infinity does offer a nice package of a 24T ripper and a 50T Combomax for $100 ...not a bad way to save a few bucks on great blades)

Option 2: The 30T WWII is a different blade than the 30T GLRs…it’s a lot more versatile and will rip in thicker materials. It’s a $100, but can be matched to a good 60T or 80T crosscut blade to cover all your bases. Cripe Distribution currently offers a closeout on what was formerly a very good 80T DeWalt blade that's being sold under the Oldham Pro logo ...$20+ s/h makes it a tough bargain to beat IMO. Or you can mate that 30T WWII to something like the LU88, Irwin Marples 60T, Diablo 60T, or Infinity 010-060.

Tips for picking saw blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View jacobem3's profile

jacobem3

30 posts in 921 days


#8 posted 05-31-2016 10:38 PM

knotscott: great info in your blog posts, I’m still reading through them, thank you! I didn’t realize at the time I ordered the G0771, but its riving knife is only 0.090”, which I believe is sized for thin kerf blades (which explains why Grizzly doesn’t offer a separate TK riving knife as an accessory). So it seems this saw is intended for TK blades only.

I didn’t realize when I bought the G0771 that 10” full kerf blades wouldn’t be a realistic option. I’m starting to wish I had gone with the 1023 instead, but it felt like that would have been overkill for a hobbyist shop, especially after seeing a youtube video of some guys who ran a cabinet shop for many years with just a craftsman saw.

View knotscott's profile (online now)

knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#9 posted 06-01-2016 12:39 AM

Full kerf blades will work on your saw with your TK riving knife if that’s your preference or if that’s what you already have, but they will pose more resistance to the motor….it’ll be most noticeable in thicker ripping. The better TK blades are very good these days, so there’s really no reason to shy away from them.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6578 posts in 1618 days


#10 posted 06-01-2016 01:12 AM

Full kerf blades are perfectly fine with this saw. I use full kerf blades with no issues. It only becomes an issue if you work with thicker than 8/4 stock a lot. I

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com