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16 oz Rip Claw Hammer!

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Forum topic by CJIII posted 05-31-2016 02:05 AM 622 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CJIII

154 posts in 1070 days


05-31-2016 02:05 AM

I was taught carpentry on a 16oz hammer, I am wondering its ok to go heaver. I will be framing me a new garage and I think I need a heaver hammer but I will be using a Cordless Paslode framing nailer for most of t framing.

-- Woodworking with Limited Tools


16 replies so far

View jonmakesthings's profile

jonmakesthings

68 posts in 283 days


#1 posted 05-31-2016 02:10 AM

Go as heavy as you like. I use a 24 oz, makes it easier to drive nails with a heavier head. Might have more fatigue but it’ll only build up your forearms.

-- How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

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patron

13538 posts in 2806 days


#2 posted 05-31-2016 02:12 AM

you know what they say

‘bigger is better’
(at least the guys think so)

some of those new framers
are sure easier to swing

they come with waffle or smooth heads
some even have a notch and magnet
to hold the nail
for starting in tight places

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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CJIII

154 posts in 1070 days


#3 posted 05-31-2016 02:23 AM

I may add a Vaughan 20oz milled face but I am use to the 16oz

-- Woodworking with Limited Tools

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waho6o9

7175 posts in 2042 days


#4 posted 05-31-2016 02:30 AM

This Harbor Freight framing hammer is great to use.

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#5 posted 05-31-2016 03:28 AM

I understand the advantages of the framing hammer, but I have always preferred the curved claw type. The ripping hammer is fair to middling when you have to hack something apart, but the geometry is poor for pulling nails. I have both, but always prefer the curved claw.

I am not a super macho raw meat eating guy; in fact, I really like quiche. So I find 16 oz. hammers work just fine for me, but I have heavier (20 oz. I think) that I do use on occasion. For any nail up to 16 penny box nails, I think 16 oz. is ample. Bigger nails want heavier hammers. For most construction, 16 penny are big enough.

But for metal working, I often reach for 3 lb. or 4 lb. hammers.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Texcaster

1140 posts in 1139 days


#6 posted 05-31-2016 06:38 AM



you know what they say bigger is better
(at least the guys think so)

- patron

In the hand department bigger is better for this sort of thing.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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devann

2201 posts in 2158 days


#7 posted 05-31-2016 06:53 AM

When I started learning carpentry, for framing I was instructed to come back the next day with some basic hand tools, a hammer among them. I was told, “don’t come back with a hammer that’s nothing more than a peanut cracker”.
After work that day I bought a 32 oz. Vaughan. Yep, that was a little overkill. I then switched to a 22 oz. Estwing. That worked okay for a few years until someone introduced to a 28 oz. rigging axe.

The difference was night and day. Just the right amount of weight. The balance is 180° from a claw hammer, making it so much easier to drive nails. You won’t believe the difference until you’ve tried it. You’ll go from setting and repeatedly striking the nail, to setting and driving them home in a single lick. I’ve seen where it’s not uncommon for guys new to the axe & Sinker nails learning to drive 20 nails in 30 seconds by lunch time of that day. They love it!

When new, we take the axe blade side, and holding it perpendicular to the wheel on the bench grinder knock the sharp edge off creating two corners at the edge of the blade. This is done to prevent chipping of the blade edge because we’ve learned it’s faster to cut a nail in two rather than fiddle with pulling it. This technique mostly only applies to framing applications by chopping between the two boards that need to be separated. It takes a little practice, but it’s doable. That, and when driving nails, and you set one and it bends, without breaking rhythm you can spin the hammer to the axe side, flip the nail away on the next swing, continuing nailing without changing rhythm.

  • Just as important as which hammer to use is which nail to buy.* Use Sinkers, preferably green vinyl checker head Sinkers, but CC coated Sinkers are okay. Stay away from the Common nails like you Grandpa used. They’ll bend so easily compared to the Sinkers. Again there is also a night and day difference between driving the two nails. That and if you drive enough nails you’ll learned that the Commons will give you “Tennis Elbow” much faster than using the Sinkers.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#8 posted 05-31-2016 08:13 AM

Yeah, the sinkers are what we used to call box nails (came in 6 and 8 penny too).

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

732 posts in 2531 days


#9 posted 05-31-2016 10:40 AM

Since you asked: Plumb Wooden handle 22 oz framing hammer. Hard to find but worth it.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View devann's profile

devann

2201 posts in 2158 days


#10 posted 05-31-2016 09:30 PM

Box nails aka common nails don’t share the same head characteristics has sinker nails.

Take a closer look to the underside of the head and you’ll see the difference.

Yes, you can also buy sinkers in various sizes typically found in common nails.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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bandit571

14599 posts in 2149 days


#11 posted 05-31-2016 09:53 PM

I have a Vaughn 22 and a Craftsman 22 you can have, since I longer do formwork. Wood handles are the best, saves a lot of wear& tear on you. My two have been called “War Clubs” by others, but they did the jobs asked of them.

Somewhere, I think I have a 16 oz rip claw hammer…...don’t use it much.

Hands are messed up from Uncle Arthur(itis) and I can NOT hold on to any handles like Estwing uses, they just fly off on the back swing.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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conifur

955 posts in 617 days


#12 posted 05-31-2016 10:04 PM



I was taught carpentry on a 16oz hammer, I am wondering its ok to go heaver. I will be framing me a new garage and I think I need a heaver hammer but I will be using a Cordless Paslode framing nailer for most of t framing.

- CJIII

No it is not okay, first, you will bruise the nail heads, 2nd all those heavier framing hammers are just there hanging on the store shelves to have a place to hang out, NOT TO BE USED, just look at me!!!!!!!!!

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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MadMark

978 posts in 918 days


#13 posted 05-31-2016 10:04 PM

Estwing 22oz framing hammer back when I was a framing & roofing animal. 2 hits, one to drive, one to set on a #10 or #16. Had arm muscles like most men’s thighs! But that was long ago & far away & the wench is surely gone by now …

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View lew's profile

lew

11340 posts in 3221 days


#14 posted 05-31-2016 11:51 PM

It’s all fun and games until your elbow gives out.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View CJIII's profile

CJIII

154 posts in 1070 days


#15 posted 06-01-2016 10:11 AM

I went bought me a Estwing 20oz rip claw hammer from Home Depot yesterday, it feels good but I will be still using a cordless framing nailer.

-- Woodworking with Limited Tools

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