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grinder paddle switch vs normal switch

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Forum topic by treesner posted 05-31-2016 12:58 AM 384 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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treesner

166 posts in 424 days


05-31-2016 12:58 AM

curious of the benefits and draw backs of the paddle switch on an angle grinder are?

I was considering this miluakee one and see it comes in different options. I plan to use it with a sanding disk for wood carving stool seats and such
http://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-6146-30-2-Inch-Grinder-Paddle/dp/B0052UWYE8?ie=UTF8&ref_=cm_cd_al_qh_dp_i

Also if you have an opinion on 4.5 vs 5 that would be helpful


6 replies so far

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Loren

8294 posts in 3107 days


#1 posted 05-31-2016 01:23 AM

For sanding I would want to be able to lock it on,
but for using a carving head I dunno. Safety
issue mostly.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2173 posts in 1484 days


#2 posted 05-31-2016 03:41 AM

I have always preferred the paddle switch. My first one (which still runs like a champ after new brushes a couple of years ago) is a B & D about 40 years old (I bought it new). Unlike current paddle switches, it doesn’t have the little device you have to flip to turn it on. That’s a safety device to prevent accidentally having it come on when you set it down. I am always conscious of that danger, and have never had a problem.

What I like most is probably the fact that it’s off instantly as soon as you let off on the paddle. It does have a lock-on button, but I have rarely needed it.

I use mine on an almost daily basis, not only for metal, but with the right discs, for shaping wood as well. HF has a dish shaped carbide disk for rough shaping, and flap sanders (with overlapping sanding flaps) are available in both flat and dish (convex) configurations.

They are a powerful and versatile tool.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3926 posts in 1953 days


#3 posted 05-31-2016 10:54 AM

I also prefer the paddle switch, but I’ve not carved wood with one.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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treesner

166 posts in 424 days


#4 posted 05-31-2016 04:17 PM

do any of the paddle switches have a variable speed like how air guns work (i’ve only seen variable speed as a separate dial)

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mpounders

821 posts in 2355 days


#5 posted 05-31-2016 04:26 PM

Paddle switches are just easier to turn on and off, rather than searching for the other type. For carving especially, it gives better control and safety. especially if using a chainsaw type disc. I have both types, but favorite is the paddle.

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

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runswithscissors

2173 posts in 1484 days


#6 posted 05-31-2016 07:30 PM

I’ve never seen one with a variable speed. Since they are a universal motor, you could use a router speed controller, but the switch would still be just on/off.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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