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Thin Kerf Blades

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Forum topic by gunsrocke posted 05-29-2016 06:43 PM 747 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gunsrocke

1 post in 189 days


05-29-2016 06:43 PM

I have just spent 2 years acquiring tools and setting up shop. Geeze that will be an on going thing. I purchased a Laguna Fusion table saw (last month after playing with a craftsman and lots of research) and have been using Full Kerf Freud GLR and Fusion blades. I am ripping hard maple, walnut and cherry for cutting boards. I tried a Freud thin kerf rip and things bound up. I think this is because of the kerf and the riving knife???? can anyone offer some more insight. Thin kerf works better on the saw but not if it binds.


14 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1813 days


#1 posted 05-29-2016 06:50 PM

Your riving knife has to match the blade, it must be a tad thinner than the blade. A full kerf riving knife is probably thicker than the thin kerf blade hence the jam up.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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RibsBrisket4me

1526 posts in 1967 days


#2 posted 05-29-2016 08:07 PM

What Bondo says!

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Jim Finn

2409 posts in 2383 days


#3 posted 05-30-2016 12:54 PM

OK … what is the solution? I want to use the thin kerf blade because it cuts easier. How to I correct the, too thin a splitter, issue? Replace the splitter? I wonder where to get one. Grind it thinner? Any suggestions?

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1813 days


#4 posted 05-30-2016 01:02 PM

Hopefully you can get a thin kerf riving knife from your table saw manufacturer.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#5 posted 05-30-2016 01:14 PM

The first thing to check is the alignment of the riving knife with the blade, and it’s flatness. If it’s perfectly aligned and is flat, but is still wider than your thin kerf (TK) blade, you’ll either need to grind it thinner or make a new one (or find a friend who’s good with metal to make it….you can use metal from an old thin kerf blade for the material). It doesn’t have to be fancy, but it does need to fit the bracket…not a bad idea to use the original as a template. I don’t think Laguna offers an alternative, but it can’t hurt to call and ask. (Hopefully the OP will join in the thread, which helps attract more comments and more detail)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1191 days


#6 posted 05-30-2016 01:50 PM

A too thick Riving Knife! Imagine that! Yep, it seems that if the manufacturers wanted you to use thin kerf blades on their saws, they would provide a riving knife that would fit the T K blades. Someone should to let them know there is a problem with their design.. ........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View ste6168's profile

ste6168

250 posts in 633 days


#7 posted 05-30-2016 03:31 PM

Just thinking out loud here, but if you are unable to obtain a thinner one from manufacture, can you hit the current one on the belt sander for a few seconds? May just take enough off to work.

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waho6o9

7171 posts in 2038 days


#8 posted 05-30-2016 03:35 PM

Can’t a wedge be placed where the cut is past the riving knife?

Of course you stop the spinning blade first.

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1191 days


#9 posted 05-30-2016 03:52 PM


Can t a wedge be placed where the cut is past the riving knife?

Of course you stop the spinning blade first.

- waho6o9

The safest thing to do is to remove the R K, and go about cutting your wood. When done, put it back on and use the proper blade to get the job done.

I just can’t believe that saving .030” of wood per cut is that important to some people. The most you would save is maybe 3/16” on a board with 6 cuts.

For almost 40 years operating my own woodworking business, I always figured there would be at least 20% unusable wood, and always added that to my bid. Sometimes I made out like a bandit with getting good wood, and sometimes 20% wasn’t enough.

I did have one thin kerf blade when I first started in ‘78, but tossed it before ‘79. A waste of money in my opinion…....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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ArtMann

132 posts in 278 days


#10 posted 05-30-2016 05:31 PM

A thin kerf blade will work wonders on the cutting speed of an under powered saw. I never heard of anyone using one to save wood.

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#11 posted 05-30-2016 06:04 PM

I just can t believe that saving .030” of wood per cut is that important to some people. The most you would save is maybe 3/16” on a board with 6 cuts.

For almost 40 years operating my own woodworking business, I always figured there would be at least 20% unusable wood, and always added that to my bid. Sometimes I made out like a bandit with getting good wood, and sometimes 20% wasn t enough.

I did have one thin kerf blade when I first started in 78, but tossed it before 79. A waste of money in my opinion…....... Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

The technology of TK blades, and saw blades in general has improved a ton in the past 35 years. The better TK blades will rival the cut quality of a comparable full kerf blade. It’s not about saving wood for most of us. A 1/8” full kerf blade is 33% wider than a 3/32” TK, and is simply noticeably easier to spin when ripping thick dense wood. Rarely do they exhibit problems for most hobbyists if the wood is flat and straight. Full kerf blades are undoubtedly a better choice for commercial settings that run their saws harder for longer periods of time. There’s also less incentive for those of us with true 3hp+ saws, but what a Godsend they can be for someone trying push a smaller motor hard.

I’d stick with Infinity, Forrest, Ridge Carbide, Tenryu, Freud Industrial, CMT Industrial, Freud Diablo, CMT ITK Plus, Irwin Marples, Leitz, Delta Industrial, DeWalt Precision Trim, Amana, among others, and for woodworking would avoid most Skil, HF, Sears, Avanti/Avanti Pro, Vermont American, Ryobi, DW Contruction, Oldham Contractor, Workforce, and other off-names unless you know it to be good quality. Keep ‘em clean and sharp.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#12 posted 05-30-2016 07:12 PM

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runswithscissors

2178 posts in 1487 days


#13 posted 05-31-2016 04:42 AM

14 gauge steel is about right for thin kerf blades. Not hard to make your own.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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splatman

558 posts in 860 days


#14 posted 05-31-2016 04:45 AM

Make a copy of the R/K out of thinner sheetmetal stock.

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