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Getting ready to Mount the 1st of 3 Cabinets - I'm Getting Cold Feet

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Forum topic by 1voyager1 posted 05-27-2016 05:06 AM 1161 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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1voyager1

74 posts in 899 days


05-27-2016 05:06 AM

I’ve run the 1st cabinet as a test run for the other 2, so far so good.

Except for the doors it is complete. I want to finish the test run by mounting it in place on the wall.

It will go at the far right in the corner.
The building seems to be quite square.
The cabinet is also.
I’m not too worried about things lining up.
The back of the cabinet is 3/16” birch PW installed flush into a 3/8” [1/2 the thickness of the 3/4” PW sides] rabbet in the side pieces.
It is glued and nailed to the 3/4” side pieces.

My concern?

Is the attachment of the back to the sides going to be strong enough to hold the weight of a fully loaded cabinet?
I’m getting twitchy about it.
I’m thinking of adding a couple of strips of the same wood as on the wall to the backside of the cabinet so that they fit between the wall mounting strips and are screwed into the side pieces.
Making the sides pass some of the weigh to the wall.
I’m not sure if that is clearly stated.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.


11 replies so far

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#1 posted 05-27-2016 05:17 AM

Most of the world installs cabinets hanging on a wall to cleats. Ether wood cleats or metal cleats. You’ll be fine. A back flush with the sides is not a standard practice. The back is usually offset the thickness of the cleat. That way the sides hide the cleat.

btw, using one of these simplifies cabinet setting, mounting tremendously. The first day I used one, it payed for itself. It helps to also purchase a typical camera tripod with a geared center post.

There are several on the market at different price points. I don’t think the Stanley is available anymore. I have seen other brands that look like clones. I also have a Bosch version that is a good value, even at twice the price.

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/2176

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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1voyager1

74 posts in 899 days


#2 posted 05-27-2016 07:32 PM

Thanks devann.
My inexperience and ignorance are showing.
But, I am learning.

I should have gone with a french cleat to hang the box.
I’ve got to run to town today to pick up some cabinet screws.
I’ll use some of them to reinforce the attachment of the back to the sides.
I’ll be much more comfortable with it then.

I am committed to the mounting strips already on the wall.
They’ve been installed with 16 penny nails into the studs, don’t want to tear it apart.
It’ll work, just not as nicely or easily as a better thought out installation.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#3 posted 05-27-2016 07:47 PM

Top and bottom rails inside of the cabinet is a wise move.

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#4 posted 05-27-2016 09:17 PM

If the back is very well attached you will probably be alright but you should have installed the cleats that’s obvious by now its standard practice for cabinet making

But do not fear, you can still do it by simply adding them on now. Screws from tops/bottoms and sides will do the trick. If you’re worried about screws showing use plugs.

In the future, 86 the mounting strips. They are not necessary just screw the cabinet to the studs with 3” cabinet screws (large head).

Remember most of the with is downward as long as the cab is secured to the wall reasonably well its not coming off.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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1voyager1

74 posts in 899 days


#5 posted 05-28-2016 07:05 AM

The wall strips are a necessity. To fill the 80” width of wall between the corner and the window required 3 X 26”+ wide cabinets. The stud spacing would only have allowed 1 vertical row of fasteners to hold the 1st cabinet to the wall. The wall strips allow more better spaced fasteners to the wall.

I have decided to go ahead and use a french cleat to hold the cabinet in place by placing it just below the top wall strip. That will make putting the cabinet up and fastening it down much easier than what I was envisioning I would have to do. The cleat piece on the back of the cabinet will run the whole width of the cabinet and be screwed into the sides adding strength to the back piece’s attachment to the sides. I’ll add another cross piece lower down attached the same way. They’ll both be located between the wall strips and will not interfere. That makes me more confident in the strength of the back’s attachment, and its ability to carry the type of load I’ll probably be putting into those cabinets.

Finally, I’ll add a 3/4” strip to the back edge of the outer side of the final cabinet. It will abut the wall and hide the strips between the cabinets and the wall.
It’ll be stained and polyurethaned to match the cabinet’s side, then screwed but probably not glued to the back edge of the end side panel. I’m thinking that will effectively hide the wall strips.

That makes my feet feel a bit warmer and me more confident in the cabinets being strong enough to do the job.
I’m ready to start hanging it tomorrow.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#6 posted 05-28-2016 12:01 PM

16” OC studs you should have a corner to screw into plus one more stud. In addition, your screwing the cabs to each other so there will be plenty of support. Just remember to use those 3” screws. If the strips make you feel better ok, just keep in mind future they are normally used to mount cabs.

I usually just use a 2×4 under the bottom to support cabs and keep level, but it if you’re doing it yourself I could see it might be an advantage.

It will all be over soon and you’ll stand back wondering why you were fretting so much! ;-)

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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1voyager1

74 posts in 899 days


#7 posted 05-29-2016 12:37 AM

It is up, only hanging from the cleat, not fully attached to the wall.
But, I am very happy.

It is plumb and square.
When I fasten it to the walls, it will need to be pushed up, back and to the side while the first fasteners are installed.
That will remove all the gaps almost completely.

Get it fastened down, then I can start assembling the other 2 cabinets.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#8 posted 05-29-2016 02:13 AM

Good job!

Bottle jacks with a piece of plywood on top spring to mind.

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#9 posted 05-29-2016 04:53 AM

Voyager, if you’re using a torpedo level for installing your cabinets you might want to just use a couple screws to hold the first cabinet, second, etc… until you have them all up and aligned. Then finish applying all the screws you wish to secure the cabinets. You may find that walls and ceilings are not always dead on plumb and level, where as your cabinets are straight and square.

waho has a good idea there but be careful, don’t crush your cabinet.

Here’s what I use to hang wall cabinets when I have to do it by myself. This may give you some ideas…

There are commercial versions available. Pictured is my home made version. It just a heavy duty camera tripod (Manfrotto 475) with a geared center post and a small piece of plywood secured to it, on top of a furniture dolly with holes drilled in it for the tripod legs.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#10 posted 05-29-2016 06:35 AM

Checking back on your thread I see I should clarify my comments about using tripods.

Installing cabinets by myself I use two tripods.

A smaller one for the laser level. It allows precise placement of the level, shooting a red line along the walls where needed for proper cabinet placement.

The other tripod I use is the one pictured above to set the cabinet on top of. It can be rolled about, raised and lowered, holding the cabinet in place allowing me to use both hands for securing the cabinet to the wall.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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1voyager1

74 posts in 899 days


#11 posted 05-30-2016 05:20 AM

It is up and in. All mounting screws are in except for a couple to go into the ceiling, if I can find a rafter, truss or joist [take your pick] to screw it to. I’m ecstatic with its install. I did not use the torpedo level to install it. I used it to check how level and plumb it was hanging from the cleat and pushed into place, then after fastening it into place. The house [garage] is square and in petty good condition. I did have about a 1/8” gap near the bottom on the side. The mounting screw pulled it in. Everything is still plumb and square. I have begun to place items into the cabinet, looks good.

I may need to loosen the instal fasteners for this cabinet when I start putting the next two cabs into place to get them all lined up for height and depth. I may need to shim for depth to get them fair across the front. Getting them all the same height will be much easier, I think.

EDIT:
I found the cleat to do the job very nicely. I’m not as strong as I was as a 20-something or even as a 60-sonething, so I had M’Lady help me lift it up onto the cleat. It isn’t heavy, just bulky and clumsy to manipulate alone.
I do have a tripod, but it is for my camera. I do not see me using it as a construction tool.
The jack is a good idea. But, I used a 2×4 nailed across the top of a 2×2 that was a smidgen taller than the bottom of the cabinet. I just wedged it under the cab until it was snug against the ceiling. Then all M’Lady had to do was push it back against the walls until I got the first couple of fasteners in. Piece, of cake.
_
I’ll mow lawn tomorrow and begin assembling the last 2 the day after.
I’ve been puttering around with this for months, mostly figuring out how I wanted to do it.
The end is in sight.
Although, I do have to make doors yet. But, that is a low priority right now.
Later, Not exactly sure when, I’ll put some shelving in below the cabinets.

The next project is to begin replacing the lanai roof.
That is a whole new bucket of worms.
It was owner installed by the previous owner. Many shortcomings in how he did it, then, a hurricane and a Kona wind have made it necessary to replace it.

After that, I need to clear some jungle so I can make a pad for a new garden shed to be installed on and the existing one to be moved to. Then, I’ll begin making a couple of Langstroth bee hives for the bees I’ll be keeping on the pad behind the sheds.
Pant, pant, wheeze.
I hope I live long enough to get everything done.
As slow as I am that may be a real concern.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

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