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Restoring a 1948 Delta Homecraft 37-290 Jointer

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Forum topic by scb posted 05-26-2016 01:29 PM 807 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scb

2 posts in 193 days


05-26-2016 01:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: delta jointer restore

I’m new to restoring older tools and luckily I have a friend who’s into woodworking that can help. I’ve also done quite a bit of research and I’ve done a bit of reading at OWWM.org.

The jointer was a gift from a older friend and neighbor who simply gave it to me when I asked if he had a jointer I could use/borrow. It had a bit of rust which I’ve been cleaning up and I still have some work to do.

I’m going back and forth between leaving it with a sort of patina and doing a full restore on it. At this point I think I’m leaning toward a full restore.

For painting, I’m looking to have it sandblasted and then primed and painted it’s original blueish gray. I may or may not do the painting – I would likely have to use canned spray paint if I did it myself since I don’t have any sort of spray equipment. I’m pretty handy with spraypaint but I don’t know that I’ll be able to match the color as well as I’d like.

I’m always nervous handing anything over to someone else to do work on so my question is this…

Does anyone happen to know of a company in the Portland, Oregon area that they’d recommend for sandblasting and/or painting?

Thanks in advance!


6 replies so far

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#1 posted 05-26-2016 01:36 PM

You’ll spend more than a Homecraft 4 inch jointer is worth. You can clean it up with brake cleaner or wd-40 and scouring pads and toothbrushes for the teeny crevices. Rustoleum Dark or Light machinery gray in a spray can is plenty. Equipment was just painted, it was never primed.

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loiblb

107 posts in 518 days


#2 posted 05-26-2016 01:53 PM

Those old jointers can be made into a handy machine in the shop. Just keep in mind the fresh sand or bead blasted metal flash rust fast.
I go to a powder coating shop for my bead blasting. They do most jobs for under $20. I’m fine with that after I see what goes into blasting large casting. Find some PC shops in your area and call around. The parts of a jointer that are machined like the tables or for close fit may not be harmed, but keep that in mind too. I would just use the razor blade approach to remove rust on the tables.

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Lazyman

691 posts in 849 days


#3 posted 05-26-2016 02:16 PM

Post a picture so we can better see what you are dealing with.

I have one of those jointers from around that time and it is a solid machine. I know this isn’t the question you asked but I agree that unless you just want to restore it for the fun of it, I wouldn’t spend much money restoring it, especially if the motor is as old as the jointer (like mine is). Mine is currently listed on Craig’s List and no one wants to pay more than about $100 for it.

If you have the bed and fence cleaned up and smooth (don’t have those sand or bead blasted) and the bed height adjustments slide smoothly, the rust on the painted surfaces may not be that big of a deal because it doesn’t really affect performance. It just hurts the eye. If you just want to get rust on the painted surfaces under control, I would just use a wire brush and some spray paint.

BTW, Rustoleum has a spray paint that they claim chemically transforms rust into a protective coating so that might be worth looking into.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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scb

2 posts in 193 days


#4 posted 05-27-2016 06:15 AM

Thanks for the replies so far!

Before posting I had already put in a few hours of wd-40, green scotchbrite, and a wire brush so it’s already A LOT better than when I first got it. I just wish I had taken a photo before I touched it. I’ll try to get a few photos up this weekend.

I had not heard about using brake fluid – thanks for the tip, I’ll look into that more.

What I had read about the sandblasting was to cover all the machined surfaces with two layers of duct tape to protect it against the blasting process.

Thanks for the tip about checking with a powder coater – I called one not long ago to have a couple small things PC’d and it just wasn’t worth the minimum. In this case it might very well be. Most of that cost was the PC, not the cleanup.

Good to know about the primer – I wondered about that. A number of the restorations I read about used primer – I’m guessing it was maybe to handle the flash rusting?

I know the jointer isn’t worth much. I laughed when I saw an ad for a restored one for $600. It was fully restored and beautiful but that’s just CRAZY!

My purpose for the restoration is to learn and also because I know the gentleman who gave it to me would be tickled to see it all fixed up like new. He had a lot of the original documentation that’s in perfect condition. I also plan on having this little guy in the shop for a long time and since it was free I’m ok spending some money to make it look really good, within a reasonable cost.

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Lazyman

691 posts in 849 days


#5 posted 05-27-2016 12:34 PM

Sounds like you are doing it for the fun of it. I love to see old restored machines. Be careful. It could become an obsession and the next thing you know, you will have a $600 jointer instead of a free one. LOL.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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loiblb

107 posts in 518 days


#6 posted 05-27-2016 01:03 PM

This is a old short bed Walker Turner that I cleaned up. Three new matched v-belts and a little oil in the ports on the bearings and its good. It’s handy does not take up much room.

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