LumberJocks

Help with end grain cutting board cracking problems

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by indychip posted 05-25-2016 11:17 AM 844 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View indychip's profile

indychip

75 posts in 1586 days


05-25-2016 11:17 AM

I just completed several end grain cutting boards for a customer. This morning I woke up and noticed a bunch of little cracks all over the end grain. What happened? Could the wood have been too wet when I glued up and cracked when it began to dry? Is it time to buy a moisture meter?


6 replies so far

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1979 days


#1 posted 05-25-2016 12:24 PM

Seems like you’ve answered your own question.
I don’t know what the moisture content of your wood was, but obviously it was too high for the application.
I keep two moisture meters on my bench, and use them often. Many times I re-rack a piece of lumber if it is too high.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#2 posted 05-25-2016 12:36 PM

Were you using different kinds of wood, possibly one that was much drier than the other. As the wetter one dried it would not be able to shrink and would crack.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View indychip's profile

indychip

75 posts in 1586 days


#3 posted 05-25-2016 05:14 PM

Thanks for the responses. I was using multiple types of wood. The only one with cracks was the walnut. Obviously that was too wet.

I see different types of moisture meters. Pin type and non pin type. Which is best?

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#4 posted 05-25-2016 06:18 PM

Pin type you push in and get a better measurement of the interior wood.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

691 posts in 1262 days


#5 posted 05-25-2016 10:46 PM

When you built them did you clamp the c**p out of them to close up gaps.And add lots of glue that’s s mostly water.

I’m just thinking if you started with high mc wood you would have noticed before you got this far.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2409 days


#6 posted 05-26-2016 04:33 PM

oil, oil, oil (non-hardening (mineral oil))

Don’t wipe it off. Let is soak in.

I’ve done this to end grain butcher blocks and it swelled the wood up and closed the separations and cracks. Since the oil doesn’t evaporate, you just keep adding to, eventually, saturate the wood. With oil replacing the lost moisture, the block won’t shrink, thus will not crack and split.

Of course, you have to be mindful of that your customers may not be too hot on maintenance, so your project may go south after the fact.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com