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Forum topic by smithcreek posted 05-24-2016 08:09 PM 503 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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smithcreek

17 posts in 198 days


05-24-2016 08:09 PM

this is my first post here and I apologize in advance for it being a question.

I fell into wood work by accident but have found it to be very good for me. I have everything in a space roughly 7 by 12 so I get cluttered quickly but other than that I manage pretty well. I am about to buy a metal building to move into and am unsure how much space is comfortable, I know there is no such thing as too much shop but I have to draw the line somewhere so what is reasonable?
this is what I have now:

12 inch sliding miter
10 inch table saw RTS21G
8 inch belt disk
10 inch chop saw
bench top drill press
bench top band saw
8 inch grinder

this is what I plan to have:

out feed table and side wings w/router table for table saw
floor mounted band saw
floor mounted drill press
spindle sander
scroll saw
minimum 30 inch bed lathe.

I have a 10 by 12 tool crib with rolling tool boxes where I keep hand tools and welding equipment now and I will have the space where the shop tools are now for additional storage for lumber and seldom used tools. my compressor will stay where it is now and I am going to make my own dust collection system and it will be located outside in an enclosure.

Thanks in advance.

creek


12 replies so far

View MisterBill's profile

MisterBill

411 posts in 1717 days


#1 posted 05-24-2016 08:23 PM

Go to Grizzly.com and play around with their work shop planer. I believe that the address is www.grizzly.com/workshop-planner.

View TheGreatJon's profile

TheGreatJon

296 posts in 699 days


#2 posted 05-24-2016 08:28 PM

I have a detached 2 car garage (24’ x 27’) that is completely dedicated to my woodshop. It is big enough for miter saw station, RAS, 12×36” lathe, 20” band saw, stationary scroll saw, big table saw with extension and outfeed that doubles as an assembly table, shaper, 16” jointer, 18” planer (both the jointer and planer have small footprints for their capacity), dust collector, wall mounted lumber storage, 4ftx8ft shelving unit, and a small rolling toobox.

The tablesaw, shaper and assembly/outfeed form an island right in the middle and everything else lines up against the walls. It is comfortable and there is room to manouver all around the island and at each tool. Only the planer is on a mobile base and gets tucked into a corner when not in use.

That being said there isn’t much room for expansion… and I’d love to find space for a mortising machine, a good sized stationary disc sander, and probably a few other things that I haven’t thought of yet. :) You’ll find good use for whatever space you have.

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

695 posts in 853 days


#3 posted 05-24-2016 08:33 PM

Personally, I would shoot for 25×25 if that fits the budget and location. With that it can also be used as a garage later too (depending on foundation of course).

Perhaps more importantly, make sure you think about layout options and especially power runs and duct work BEFORE you start. For example, you can run dust collection duct work under the slab (or floor if pier and beam) and possibly minimize nuisances with ducts running into the middle of the shop. Also you may want both 110 and 220V power receptacles in the middle of the shop so if you can run conduit through the slab or under the floor during construction you’ll feel smarter later. You might not need 220 now but when you upgrade to your dream saw you’ll wish you had an easy way to get 220 where you need it. Even if you don’t think you’ll ever want to convert to a garage, you may want a garage door on it just to make moving bulking items in and out easier.

Spending someone else’s money is fun.

And by the way, don’t assume that more space equals less clutter. One of Murphy’s laws is that the amount of clutter is directly proportional to the amount of space available.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 918 days


#4 posted 05-24-2016 08:56 PM

I have an 80 sq ft cabinet shop …

You can do a lot with a little if you pack it right …

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View smithcreek's profile

smithcreek

17 posts in 198 days


#5 posted 05-24-2016 08:59 PM

Thanks Bill, I will look at that planner for sure.

Jon, that paints a pretty good picture and the list you shared gives me a notion of what to expect.

LazyMan, I started out planning a wood floor but I can pour a slab cheaper and faster so I will be going that route.

I have 220 there already so I am good there, I like the idea off roughing the pipe in maybe some floor boxes and if not used right off some blank covers will keep them clean. a new TS is on the wish list.
the doors will be double doors on one end. I agree space doesn’t equal organization, for me anyway, I throw almost nothing away.

thanks guys, when I ponder best use for the space I have now that might free up space in the shop and make a decision I’ll share.

as a side the reason I am going with the metal building is because after going to Lowes and HD and pricing the material it turns out I can buy metal and save about 1500 to 2000 bucks depending on final choice and watch someone else do it in a day or threeVS me taking a couple of weeks to do it. I am buying just a shell, I will do the finish.

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smithcreek

17 posts in 198 days


#6 posted 05-24-2016 09:09 PM



I have an 80 sq ft cabinet shop …

You can do a lot with a little if you pack it right …

M

- MadMark

Mark I am in 84 Sq Ft right now and have managed not to kill myself but I am constantly either tripping on something, stepping on something or tangled in something. I actually feel a little guilty spending the money on myself but I am trying to get investments like this out of the way before I retire, if any of us with more than a couple of years live to retire. I just built a little jon boat for my grandsons out of that shop by picking the days I could set up on saw horses outside and work but now I lost my saw horses, I built a stand for the sliding miter with them and have it set up at the back deck I am re-decking.

Thanks Mark.

creek

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1722 days


#7 posted 05-24-2016 09:58 PM

Creek, I probably missed it, but you need space for your work bench in addition to everything else you listed. Also, a real determinant of your space needs is what you intend to make. Will it be bottle stoppers or dining tables & chairs? What about lumber storage? Cabinets require sheets of plywood. Where will you store and break them down? How do you intend to finish your widgets? I highly suggest a separate finishing room if at all possible. Have you made any provision for storing the myriad hand tools? HTH

-- Art

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2413 posts in 2387 days


#8 posted 05-24-2016 10:00 PM

Just to give you an idea of what I have.: I have a 314sq feet shop with roughly the same equipment you have plus a toilet and sink. It is a good size for me but I just make small crafty items and I have another building that houses my wood supply and my compressor. My dust collector is in an outside closet I made for it.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 918 days


#9 posted 05-24-2016 10:26 PM

I’m disabled and can’t walk much so most everything in the shop is in reach from my chair. Having said that you can always use more space. Since that pic was taken I’ve added a table mount 1×42 belt sander, a Sears 12” bandsaw and more rolling stands. The only thing I need to move to is the planer and OSS and both stay within hose reach.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View smithcreek's profile

smithcreek

17 posts in 198 days


#10 posted 05-25-2016 03:42 PM



Creek, I probably missed it, but you need space for your work bench in addition to everything else you listed. Also, a real determinant of your space needs is what you intend to make. Will it be bottle stoppers or dining tables & chairs? What about lumber storage? Cabinets require sheets of plywood. Where will you store and break them down? How do you intend to finish your widgets? I highly suggest a separate finishing room if at all possible. Have you made any provision for storing the myriad hand tools? HTH

Art I have two other buildings, a 8×12 tool crib and the space I am using now is actually a L shaped 7 X 24 with gull wing at one end that is 7×12, the power tools are in the 7×12 gull wing now so when I move that will give me plenty of storage for lumber. the other half of that space houses a 80 gallon syrup kettle that I may be moving and if I do that will give 284 square feet for finishing and storage. I don’t plan to do any furniture quality work, but then again I didn’t plan to get hooked on working with wood either.

thanks Art.

creek

- AandCstyle


View smithcreek's profile

smithcreek

17 posts in 198 days


#11 posted 05-25-2016 03:50 PM

Jim, between 3 and 4 hundred Sq Ft is what I was thinking but I really don’t know what to expect. I am lucky in one sense because I do have other places to store things and keep them dry. I am buying a metal carport to use for a tractor shed at the same time and there will be open space there to but it will be roof only, no sides or ends.

Mark I have a friend who is set up that way, he rolls from machine to machine in a rolling chair and his table saw is the only thing he has to stand to use.

I just started using the Grizzly shop planner…......... I like it so far.

thanks.

creek

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1146 days


#12 posted 05-25-2016 03:51 PM

The Grizzly shop planner is a useful tool. I use it to play around with shop layouts once in awhile and will draw a 4X8 rectangle than move it around to see how the layout works both around the infeed and outfield side of the tools. Also don’t forget to leave a open staging area space. It can be your assembly area but it’s nice to have someplace to store pieces you are working on that is out of the way if you want to work in a smaller project. For instance I have a dresser in my shop half done right now that i have put to the side so I can make some smaller projects I want to finish. I admit I should just finish the dresser but sometimes I just want to change gears and do something different.

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