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attaching table top fasteners

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Forum topic by gdiddy13 posted 05-23-2016 03:16 PM 552 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gdiddy13

37 posts in 208 days


05-23-2016 03:16 PM

I think I’m in the right forum.

I have decided that I will be using table top fasteners to attached a reclaimed barn door to the apron.

Currently I do not own a bench saw, ( I know).

The option I thought of (as I’m doing all joints by hand) is to simply chisel out each slot for the fastener?

Thoughts? What might be another way?


16 replies so far

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

881 posts in 1901 days


#1 posted 05-23-2016 04:04 PM

I’m trying to envision how you’d accomplish that with a miter saw.

-- Visualize whirled peas

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gdiddy13

37 posts in 208 days


#2 posted 05-23-2016 04:13 PM

haha, yep nevermind. I guess on a very small end table or something that might work. I’m going to go back and edit this post!

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4858 posts in 2278 days


#3 posted 05-23-2016 04:19 PM

I would rethink the use of those tabletop fasteners that fit into slots. Yes they allow wood movement, but sometimes you feel like the top will slide around or fall off (especially when moving the furniture). I much prefer figure 8 fasteners. Skip the hollow stamped metal ones, and look for the solid steel ones. My local woodworking store sells them in bulk. Available at Lee Valley and elsewhere.
Use these…

not these…

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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gdiddy13

37 posts in 208 days


#4 posted 05-23-2016 04:23 PM

Good idea, these would be able to pivot a bit to allow for movement too.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#5 posted 05-23-2016 05:14 PM

You could cut the slots with a router or bisuit joiner if you have either of those. I get my table top fasteners from cshardware.com for a few cents apiece.

If that’s not an option, another option would be gluing blocks to the inside of the apron, and drilling oversized holes in those blocks to allow for movement. Then, just screw up through them into the table top.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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gdiddy13

37 posts in 208 days


#6 posted 05-23-2016 05:28 PM

I may have access to a router, and that would be a no-brainer! I think that maybe I shouldn’t be on here quite yet, I am really inexperienced. Thanks guys!

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#7 posted 05-23-2016 05:35 PM


I may have access to a router, and that would be a no-brainer! I think that maybe I shouldn t be on here quite yet, I am really inexperienced.

- gdiddy13

No experience necessary (however if you’re going to use the router, some experienced guidance wouldn’t be a bad idea), and if you stick around, chances are you’ll progress faster. You can set the router up with an edge guide (or on a router table if available) with a straight bit, and cut the groove down the apron.

I haven’t found like the tops feel like they’re going to move when using them, you don’t need to leave them that loose. I usually space them one every foot or so, or a minimum of two per side, on all four aprons.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2089 days


#8 posted 05-23-2016 05:39 PM

I usually use the blocks glued to the apron approach as above. Simple effective and nearly cost free.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View Dan Wolfgang's profile

Dan Wolfgang

39 posts in 272 days


#9 posted 05-23-2016 07:17 PM

Yep, I just recently did this with a chisel. I think they’re about 3/32” thick, so I just used an 1/8” chisel to cut a small slot—big enough that it can move, about an inch long, I think.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2155 days


#10 posted 05-24-2016 12:34 AM

I use the figure 8 fasteners for their cost, ease of use, and the only way to screw them up is to use screws that are too long (don’t ask how I learned this!)

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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gdiddy13

37 posts in 208 days


#11 posted 05-25-2016 12:23 PM

For those of you that used the figure 8 fasteners, did you use a forstner bit ?

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firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#12 posted 05-25-2016 12:48 PM

A forstner bit is the only way to go. You need a flat bottomed hole.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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gdiddy13

37 posts in 208 days


#13 posted 05-25-2016 01:17 PM

thanks guys, I’m hoping to have it ready to put together this weekend. I’ll try to post some pics to prove I’m not completely inept (only partially)

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

185 posts in 1679 days


#14 posted 05-25-2016 01:50 PM

If you use the forstner (router would also be a great option), then my only comment is one note about the picture above showing the pressed metal one. I know the pic is supposed to show which one not to buy, but I’ll also point out the way it is installed in a hole that is exactly the size of the fastener and with the wood fitting tightly against the narrow “neck” of the figure eight is in my opinion not the way to do these.

To allow for wood movement, these need to be able to move some small mount even if it’s only 1/32 of an inch. Having the figure eight captured is probably not going to cause any real problems as the wood will probably get distorted around the fastener since it’s a sharp point. But is offends my sensibilities to not clean up the end of the hole with a chisel so the figure eight mount has a bit of clearance to rotate to allow for wood movement.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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gdiddy13

37 posts in 208 days


#15 posted 05-25-2016 01:55 PM

Great point Mike! I’ll be using an 11/16 bit and plan on doing just as you said with a chisel.

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